Tag Archives: Charger

Counterfeit Macbook charger teardown

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Ken Shirriff @ righto.com has done a detailed teardown of a counterfeit macbook charger and show us the difference from a genuine one and why this can be dangerous. He writes:

What’s inside a counterfeit Macbook charger? After my Macbook charger teardown, a reader sent me a charger he suspected was counterfeit. From the outside, this charger is almost a perfect match for an Apple charger, but disassembling the charger shows that it is very different on the inside. It has a much simpler design that lacks quality features of the genuine charger, and has major safety defects.

Counterfeit Macbook charger teardown – [Link]

Smart Battery Charger

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gfwilliams @ instructables.com has build a smart battery charger that is able to individually charge each battery , automatically discharge them and give you an idea of their capacity. The charger is controlled by an Espruino Pico and results are displayed on a Nokia 5110 LCD display.

If you’re anything like me you’ll end up with a lot of rechargeable batteries, none of which end up being charged properly, and some of which turn out to be completely unusable. It’d be perfect if you had a low-power battery charger that you could leave on all the time, that would charge your batteries individually, automatically discharge them, and give you an idea of their real capacity. That’s what you’ll make in this tutorial!

Smart Battery Charger – [Link]

LTC4123 – Low Power Wireless Charger

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Linear Technology Corporation introduces the LTC4123 to further expand its offerings in wireless battery charging. The LTC4123 combines a 30mW wireless receiver with a constant-current/constant-voltage linear charger for NiMH batteries, such as Varta’s power one ACCU plus series. An external resonant LC tank connected to the LTC4123 enables the IC to receive power wirelessly from an alternating magnetic field generated by a transmit coil.  Integrated power management circuitry converts the coupled AC current into the DC current required to charge the battery. Wireless charging with the LTC4123 allows for a completely sealed product and eliminates the need to constantly replace primary batteries. Zn-Air (Zinc-Air) detection allows applications to work interchangeably with both rechargeable NiMH batteries and primary Zn-Air batteries with the same application circuit. Both battery types can directly power a hearing aid ASIC without the need for additional voltage conversion. By contrast, a 3.7V Li-ion battery requires a step-down regulator in addition to the LTC4123’s functionality to power the ASIC.

LTC4123 – Low Power Wireless Charger – [Link]

 

Arduino MPPT Solar Charger Shield

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Lukas Fässler has designed a MPPT Solar Charger Arduino Shield and document it on the link below. A Solar MPPT charger is used to convert the solar panel voltage to the optimal voltage for charging a battery in the most efficient way. This way the solar panel works on the maximum power point and thus delivering maximum power to the battery.

The basic idea behind an MPPT solar charger is simple. A solar panel has a certain voltage (in the region of 17 to 18 volts for a 12 volts panel, somwhat dependent on temperature) at which it provides most power. So as long as the battery needs charging, you want to pull just as much current to reach this voltage. But once the battery is full you need to avoid overcharging the battery. So you want to maintain a maximum voltage for your battery (somewhere around 13.8 volts for a 12 volt lead acid battery) and no longer care about the pannel’s voltage.

Arduino MPPT Solar Charger Shield – [Link]

Lead Acid Battery float charger

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Nobilis @ instructables.com has build a lead acid float charger out of an old phone wall charger:

If you do not use your motorbike on the winter or your car stands for weeks — you better have a float charger connected to the battery. Otherwise you probably encounter engine starting problems, and your battery’s lifetime is getting shorter. In a depleted battery the emerging sulfation on the negative plates is avoid the battery to take adequate charge again, and a vicious circle happens: the battery is unable to get fully charged, which increase sulfation, which avoids proper charging, and so on, until your rather new battery is ready to be recycled.

Lead Acid Battery float charger – [Link]

Macbook charger teardown

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Ken Shirriff @ righto.com has a detailed teardown of a macbook charger explaining the various components used in it:

Have you ever wondered what’s inside your Macbook’s charger? There’s a lot more circuitry crammed into the compact power adapter than you’d expect, including a microprocessor. This charger teardown looks at the numerous components in the charger and explains how they work together to power your laptop.

Macbook charger teardown – [Link]

LiFePO4 charger

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Markus Gritsch shared his LiFePO4 charger project in the forum:

Since I really like using LiFePO4 AA and AAA batteries in some of my projects, I finally gave in and built a dedicated charger for them.
Previously I used a lab power supply to mimic the constant current/constant voltage charging curve, which worked also fine. But after seeing Patrick Van Oosterwijck nifty LiFePO4wered/USB™, I thought it would be a bit more convenient to charge these batteries using USB.

LiFePO4 charger – [Link]

Power Management Solutions: Battery Chargers

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Maurizio @ dev.emcelettronica.com writes:

Out of all portable devices, the most numerous are the mobile phones (Figure 1). Most of them feature Li-ion or Li-polymer accumulators and Freescale has a broad range of charger ICs dedicated to supporting all the phases of a complete recharge cycle. Generally speaking the charging of a mobile phone is performed by taking energy from:

a) from a wall outlet
b) from the USB port of a computer
c) from the 12V output of a vehicle

Power Management Solutions: Battery Chargers – [Link]

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates

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by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Power Integrations offers a charger interface IC compatible with Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 specification; PI says its CHY103D IC optimises efficiency to prevent handset overheating during high-speed charging.

Added to the ChiPhy charger-interface IC family, PI saya this is the first IC for off-line AC-DC chargers compatible with the Quick Charge (QC) 3.0 protocol from Qualcomm Technologies. Used alongside Power Integrations’ InnoSwitch AC-DC switcher ICs, the CHY103D device incorporates all of the functions needed to support QC 3.0. The QC 3.0 protocol implemented in the CHY103D device substantially reduces losses in the smart mobile device handset during rapid charging. This permits system designers to choose to charge handsets faster or reduce phone touch-temperature during charging, and enhances the efficiency of the charging process.

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates – [Link]