Tag Archives: Charger

Arduino MPPT Solar Charger Shield

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Lukas Fässler has designed a MPPT Solar Charger Arduino Shield and document it on the link below. A Solar MPPT charger is used to convert the solar panel voltage to the optimal voltage for charging a battery in the most efficient way. This way the solar panel works on the maximum power point and thus delivering maximum power to the battery.

The basic idea behind an MPPT solar charger is simple. A solar panel has a certain voltage (in the region of 17 to 18 volts for a 12 volts panel, somwhat dependent on temperature) at which it provides most power. So as long as the battery needs charging, you want to pull just as much current to reach this voltage. But once the battery is full you need to avoid overcharging the battery. So you want to maintain a maximum voltage for your battery (somewhere around 13.8 volts for a 12 volt lead acid battery) and no longer care about the pannel’s voltage.

Arduino MPPT Solar Charger Shield – [Link]

Lead Acid Battery float charger

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Nobilis @ instructables.com has build a lead acid float charger out of an old phone wall charger:

If you do not use your motorbike on the winter or your car stands for weeks — you better have a float charger connected to the battery. Otherwise you probably encounter engine starting problems, and your battery’s lifetime is getting shorter. In a depleted battery the emerging sulfation on the negative plates is avoid the battery to take adequate charge again, and a vicious circle happens: the battery is unable to get fully charged, which increase sulfation, which avoids proper charging, and so on, until your rather new battery is ready to be recycled.

Lead Acid Battery float charger – [Link]

Macbook charger teardown

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Ken Shirriff @ righto.com has a detailed teardown of a macbook charger explaining the various components used in it:

Have you ever wondered what’s inside your Macbook’s charger? There’s a lot more circuitry crammed into the compact power adapter than you’d expect, including a microprocessor. This charger teardown looks at the numerous components in the charger and explains how they work together to power your laptop.

Macbook charger teardown – [Link]

LiFePO4 charger

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Markus Gritsch shared his LiFePO4 charger project in the forum:

Since I really like using LiFePO4 AA and AAA batteries in some of my projects, I finally gave in and built a dedicated charger for them.
Previously I used a lab power supply to mimic the constant current/constant voltage charging curve, which worked also fine. But after seeing Patrick Van Oosterwijck nifty LiFePO4wered/USB™, I thought it would be a bit more convenient to charge these batteries using USB.

LiFePO4 charger – [Link]

Power Management Solutions: Battery Chargers

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Maurizio @ dev.emcelettronica.com writes:

Out of all portable devices, the most numerous are the mobile phones (Figure 1). Most of them feature Li-ion or Li-polymer accumulators and Freescale has a broad range of charger ICs dedicated to supporting all the phases of a complete recharge cycle. Generally speaking the charging of a mobile phone is performed by taking energy from:

a) from a wall outlet
b) from the USB port of a computer
c) from the 12V output of a vehicle

Power Management Solutions: Battery Chargers – [Link]

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates

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by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Power Integrations offers a charger interface IC compatible with Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 specification; PI says its CHY103D IC optimises efficiency to prevent handset overheating during high-speed charging.

Added to the ChiPhy charger-interface IC family, PI saya this is the first IC for off-line AC-DC chargers compatible with the Quick Charge (QC) 3.0 protocol from Qualcomm Technologies. Used alongside Power Integrations’ InnoSwitch AC-DC switcher ICs, the CHY103D device incorporates all of the functions needed to support QC 3.0. The QC 3.0 protocol implemented in the CHY103D device substantially reduces losses in the smart mobile device handset during rapid charging. This permits system designers to choose to charge handsets faster or reduce phone touch-temperature during charging, and enhances the efficiency of the charging process.

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates – [Link]

Buck battery charger handles multiple chemistries

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by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

The LTC4015 synchronous step-down battery charger controller from Linear Technology offers charge current of up to 20 A, multiple-chemistry operation, and onboard digital telemetry. The controller transfers power from a variety of input sources, such as wall adapters and solar panels, to a Li-Ion polymer, LiFePO4, or lead-acid battery stack with system load up to 35 V.

Operating over an input voltage range of 4.5 V to 35 V, the LTC4015 provides ±5% charge-current regulation up to 20 A and ±0.5% charge-voltage regulation. While a host microcontroller is required to access the most advanced features of the LTC4015, the use of an I2C port is optional.

Buck battery charger handles multiple chemistries – [Link]

35VIN & VOUT battery charge controller delivers up to 20A

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LTC4015 is a highly integrated, high voltage multichemistry synchronous step-down battery charger controller with onboard telemetry functions. The device efficiently transfers power from a variety of input sources, such as wall adapters and solar panels, to a Li-Ion/Polymer, LiFePO4 or lead-acid battery stack and system load up to 35V.

It provides advanced system monitoring and management functionality, including battery Coulomb counting and health monitoring. While a host microcontroller is required to access the most advanced features of the LTC4015, the use of an I²C port is optional. The main charging features of the product can be adjusted using pin-strap configurations and programming resistors.

35VIN & VOUT battery charge controller delivers up to 20A – [Link]

How to make a USB Li-Ion charger

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by Robert Gawron @ robertgawron.blogspot.com:

Li-ion cells become more and more popular due to their capacity and reasonable prices. In this entry I will present how to build a simple li-ion battery charger based on MCP73831 chip. It’s a quite useful device for DYI projects,in addition its cost is only around 1,5 euro.

The device uses USB port as a power supply (mini-USB connector). I use the standard gold-pins as an output socket. There’re three of them, but only two are used (looking on the image, counting from top: V+, V-). I will design my li-ion based devices in the same way (same socket, but female), then if I will connect it in the incorrect direction (rotated 180 degrees) they won’t be damaged (V- connected to V-, but V+ connected to n/c pin) – simple way to avoid plugging in an incorrect way.

How to make a USB Li-Ion charger – [Link]

The Best NiMh Charger

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Paul Allen build a great NiMh charger that connects to PC for controlling full aspects of charging process. He writes:

It’s been a long time since I posted an update on my battery charger project (in fact it has been a long time since I have posted anything!). I have been Very Busy with projects for my work and when I am not working for work, I am working on battery chargers. When I am not working on battery chargers I am trying to be a good husband and father as well as find time to do things like mow the lawn or fix the handle my son broke off the faucet.

“The Best NiMh Charger” Some may say that is quite the claim, but wait until you see all it can do (mostly thanks to the software Mark my programming friend wrote for it).

The Best NiMh Charger – [Link]