Tag Archives: Clock

LCD clock with 4″ display


mcs.uwsuper.edu has build a big LCD clock based on MSP430 mcu and DS3231 RTC clock chip. They write:

The clock is built on a 4″ (101 mm) LCD displays OD-103 manufactured by Orient Display. The LCD provides high contrast of digits and easy reading from a large distance. The unit runs on batteries and can also be powered from mains. Here is how it looks under direct sun.

The time keeping is provided by DS3231 RTC chip with an integrated high accuracy (± 5ppm) MEMS crystal. This makes PCB design very simple, as one does not need to take care on special traces design around the crystal.

LCD clock with 4″ display – [Link]

ATmega Alarm Clock & Thermometer Humidity meter


nitram147 @ instructables.com has build a ATmega based alarm clock with temperature and humidity reading. Sensor used is DHT11.

First, let me introduce you my project. I made an Alarm clock with extended functionality & thermometer and humiditymeter. Everything started when my friend (who used to bring me some old electronic rubbish and I used to check if there’s not something useful) brought me some cashing register display similar like that. When I first see them I knew that I will made from it alarm clock.

ATmega Alarm Clock & Thermometer Humidity meter – [Link]

Ovenized crystal oscillator frequency stability


E. Schrama @ ejo60.wordpress.com uses an Arduino and a DCF77 time signal receiver to test the stability of an ovenized crystal oscillator running at 1 MHz.

In this experiment I will use an Arduino and a DCF77 time signal radio receiver to measure the stability of an ovenized crystal oscillator running at 1 MHz. It demonstrates that 50ppb (or 50 milliHerz) can be achieved on the short term, whereby an aging effect of 0.1 ppb per day is demonstrated with a 18 month long dataset. The output of the 1MHz oscillator is fed into a 248 counter and six 74HC165 parallel in, serial out (piso) conversion ICs that are controlled by an ATMEGA 2560, the circuit is described here. With this setup running at 1 MHz you get a rollover every 10 years, the resolution is 1 microsecond. In principle you could do this also with an Arduino but I decided for this set-up since I already had most of the components left over from an earlier experiment.

Ovenized crystal oscillator frequency stability – [Link]

Arduino Watch Sport


by Alexis Ospitia @ instructables.com:

In today’s technology, especially electronics have come a long way, to the point that today can make projects a few years ago were very complicated to implement, thanks to these technological advances are now able to design and implement our houses projects.

and through this article I come to show you my new project, which consists of a wristwatch, so I called Arduino Watch Sport.

Arduino Watch Sport  – [Link]

ESP8266-based touchscreen clock and light controller with WiFi

Spiros Papadimitriou build a nice clock based on ESP8266 Wifi and 2.4″ LCD module. He writes:

This was a week-long hack, to build a simple touchscreen clock, with the following features:

Graphical UI with touch (no buttons)
Clock synchronization over NTP
Ability to control WiFi-connected LED lamps
Web-based configuration UI

This project was partly inspired by the Chumby (remember that?) and by our old X10 light controller (remember those!?). Current iteration’s cost is probably comparable to a used Chumby (which also has a lot more features), but it’s more fun this way. :) However, the cost could be taken down to ~$10.

ESP8266-based touchscreen clock and light controller with WiFi – [Link]

The Pendulum Clock


by Dylan Rush :

If you’ve ever rode the Link Light Rail in Seattle to the airport, you may have glanced out of the window while traveling through a tunnel and seen playing cards illuminated on the walls. These images are not made from two dimensional screens. Each display is just a row of lights that changes rapidly as the train drives by, giving the illusion of a two-dimensional picture.

The University Street station also has rows of lights blinking on the walls on the mezzanine floor. I always point out the artwork whenever I walk through the station with someone. At first glance the displays just appear to be red lines, but if you move your eyes rapidly from side to side, there are images hidden in how the lights blink.

The Pendulum Clock – [Link]

IP Time Clock using NTP protocol


by msuzuki777 @ www.instructables.com

So this Lazy Old Geek (LOG) has a couple of clocks in my bedroom. One of them loses time when the power is lost. The other is semi smart and automatically adjusts for Daylight Savings Time. Unfortunately, it does this using the old standard so I have to re-set the time four times a year. Well, I’m LAZY so I decided to make my own Clock. At first I was thinking Atomic clock as I have three in my living room (I’m a GEEK, remember?).

IP Time Clock using NTP protocol – [Link]

PIC24 bedside table alarm clock


Markus Gritsch posted pictures and code of his PIC24 bedside table alarm clock:

Another year, another clock, but for the first time for my alarm clocks. I am not using an MSP430 but a PIC24 instead. Standby current is with 5.5 µA only slightly higher than that of my MSP430 based ones. Time keeping is done using the RTCC pheripheral, which I also used for the first time.
It can be seen in action in this YouTube video
Friendly green digits :)
And of course it has a LiFePO4 battery on its back, being charged every few years using my new USB charger.
A photo transistor is also included to dim the display in the dark. Much nices to the eyes when checking what time it is in the middle of the night.

PIC24 bedside table alarm clock – [Link]

8T49NS010 Clock Synthesizer and Fanout Buffer/Divider

This reference design features the 8T49NS010 integrated circuit that functions as a clock synthesizer with a built-in fanout buffer and divider. By using an external clock source or a crystal, the 8T49NS010 can generate high performance timing geared towards the communications and datacom markets, especially for applications demanding extremely low phase noise jitter, such as 10, 40 and 100GE. Depending on the input used, the 8T49NS010’s low phase noise integer-N PLL can multiply the reference to 2400MHz or 2500MHz.

The device offers ten clock outputs (QCLK[9:0]/nQCLK[9:0]). Each output can be disabled individually through registers. With ÷2, ÷4, ÷8 and ÷16 values one can get output frequencies of 156.25MHz, 312.5MHz, 625MHz and 1250MHz when driven from a 25MHz input, for example. The input select pin REF_SEL will choose either XTAL input or CLK_IN input will be used and this pin also set the pre-divider PRE to either x2 or ÷1. The feedback divider FB_SEL pin will set the feedback divider to either ÷50, ÷25. The feedback divider should be properly set to assure the PLL lock for VCO=2.5GHz. The N1 and N0 are pins for output frequency divider setting. Aside from the divider values that can be set using pins N1 and N0, additional divider values are available through registers that can be programmed with I2C interface. This reference design recommends the FT2232 USB to UART converter to program the device divider value via I2C pins. The 8T49NS010 operates over the industrial temperature range of -40°C to +85°C with a 3.3V supply voltage.

The 8T49NS010 provides versatile frequency configurations and output format that is optimized to deliver excellent phase noise performance. The device delivers an optimum combination of high clock frequency and low phase noise performance, combined with high power supply noise rejection.

8T49NS010 Clock Synthesizer and Fanout Buffer/Divider – [Link]