Tag Archives: Clock

IP Time Clock using NTP protocol


by msuzuki777 @ www.instructables.com

So this Lazy Old Geek (LOG) has a couple of clocks in my bedroom. One of them loses time when the power is lost. The other is semi smart and automatically adjusts for Daylight Savings Time. Unfortunately, it does this using the old standard so I have to re-set the time four times a year. Well, I’m LAZY so I decided to make my own Clock. At first I was thinking Atomic clock as I have three in my living room (I’m a GEEK, remember?).

IP Time Clock using NTP protocol – [Link]

PIC24 bedside table alarm clock


Markus Gritsch posted pictures and code of his PIC24 bedside table alarm clock:

Another year, another clock, but for the first time for my alarm clocks. I am not using an MSP430 but a PIC24 instead. Standby current is with 5.5 µA only slightly higher than that of my MSP430 based ones. Time keeping is done using the RTCC pheripheral, which I also used for the first time.
It can be seen in action in this YouTube video
Friendly green digits :)
And of course it has a LiFePO4 battery on its back, being charged every few years using my new USB charger.
A photo transistor is also included to dim the display in the dark. Much nices to the eyes when checking what time it is in the middle of the night.

PIC24 bedside table alarm clock – [Link]

8T49NS010 Clock Synthesizer and Fanout Buffer/Divider

This reference design features the 8T49NS010 integrated circuit that functions as a clock synthesizer with a built-in fanout buffer and divider. By using an external clock source or a crystal, the 8T49NS010 can generate high performance timing geared towards the communications and datacom markets, especially for applications demanding extremely low phase noise jitter, such as 10, 40 and 100GE. Depending on the input used, the 8T49NS010’s low phase noise integer-N PLL can multiply the reference to 2400MHz or 2500MHz.

The device offers ten clock outputs (QCLK[9:0]/nQCLK[9:0]). Each output can be disabled individually through registers. With ÷2, ÷4, ÷8 and ÷16 values one can get output frequencies of 156.25MHz, 312.5MHz, 625MHz and 1250MHz when driven from a 25MHz input, for example. The input select pin REF_SEL will choose either XTAL input or CLK_IN input will be used and this pin also set the pre-divider PRE to either x2 or ÷1. The feedback divider FB_SEL pin will set the feedback divider to either ÷50, ÷25. The feedback divider should be properly set to assure the PLL lock for VCO=2.5GHz. The N1 and N0 are pins for output frequency divider setting. Aside from the divider values that can be set using pins N1 and N0, additional divider values are available through registers that can be programmed with I2C interface. This reference design recommends the FT2232 USB to UART converter to program the device divider value via I2C pins. The 8T49NS010 operates over the industrial temperature range of -40°C to +85°C with a 3.3V supply voltage.

The 8T49NS010 provides versatile frequency configurations and output format that is optimized to deliver excellent phase noise performance. The device delivers an optimum combination of high clock frequency and low phase noise performance, combined with high power supply noise rejection.

8T49NS010 Clock Synthesizer and Fanout Buffer/Divider – [Link]

WiFi-based Weather Forecast and Clock


by soniktech.com:

This project is a stopgap on my way to building a ground-up “Internet of Things” base design around the ESP8266 SoC WiFi solution. I started by taking a few nixie tubes I’ve had lying around from a past project, and connecting them to a Nixie Power supply I found on ebay. After making sure they lit up, I wired the Nixies up to a HV5622 chip (which anyone who makes Nixie clocks should really consider for their designs).

WiFi-based Weather Forecast and Clock – [Link]

S.M.A.R.T. Alarm Clock

by Tony DiCola @ makezine.com:

Wouldn’t it be nice to have an internet-connected alarm clock that automatically sets itself, based on your calendar? You would never miss an early appointment, never forget to set your alarm, and enjoy more restful sleep knowing you’ve solved the nightmare of regulating your alarms. An internet-savvy alarm clock could even watch your inbox and wake you up if friends or family send you an important email.

This S.M.A.R.T. Alarm Clock (Setup for Meetings, Appointments, Reminders, and Tasks) uses the Arduino Yún, which is a special Arduino with two processors. One processor runs an embedded version of Linux and is connected to the internet over wi-fi or Ethernet. The other processor uses the same chip as the Arduino Leonardo microcontroller, allowing the Yún to work with most Arduino shields and accessories. By using the Arduino Yún, this project can talk to complex web services with the Linux processor, and interface with hardware — an LCD touchscreen — on the second processor.

S.M.A.R.T. Alarm Clock – [Link]

PCI-Express Clock Generator

This reference design is a frequency generator for use in synchronizing a circuit’s operation. It consumes less than 50mW of power that specifically uses the IDT’s 9FGV0241 PCI-Express Clock Generator which is the lowest-power PCI Express timing family. It is a two output clock generator with programmable output amplitude allowing tuning for various application environments.

The circuit reduces heat dissipation to ease cooling requirements in large scale cloud computing applications. It has a programmable slew rate allowing tuning for various line lengths with an integrated output termination of 100Ω, providing maximum flexibility when working in a non-homogenous timing environment. In addition, the device has an external 25MHz crystal that supports tight parts per million (ppm) with 0 ppm synthesis error.

These clock synthesizers have various applications such as communications, computing, and consumer goods. Most members of IDT timing family feature a selectable SMBus address so that multiple devices can seamlessly share the same SMBus segment without the cumbersome additional logic that is often required with other solutions.

PCI-Express Clock Generator – [Link]

ESP8266 touchscreen WiFi light controller and clock


Spiros Papadimitriou has build a WiFi light controller and clock based on ESP8266:

A couple of months ago I picked up cheap WiFi-controlled LED bulbs (one among dozens of very similar devices), after seeing them at a friend’s place. This turned out to be an excuse to play with the ESP8266, which has inspired several hacks. I was overall very happy with these bulbs: decent Android and iOS apps and, compared to fancier solutions (e.g., Philips Hue or Belkin WeMo), they do not require any proprietary base stations, and you can’t beat the price! However, switching off the lights before falling asleep involved hunting for the phone, opening the app, and waiting for it to scan the network; not an ideal user experience. I was actually missing our old X10 alarm clock controller (remember those?), so I decided to make one from scratch, because… why not?

ESP8266 touchscreen WiFi light controller and clock – [Link]

8T49N004 Programmable Femtoclock® NG with 4-outputs

This design features a fourth generation programmable femtoclock that provides reference frequencies to replace crystals and SAW oscillators in high-performance applications. It is programmable through I2C interface. It has four selectable LVPECL or LVDS via I2C while its FemtoClock NG VCO ranges between 1.9GHz to 2.55GHz. It also meets the standard interface requirements of PCI Express (2.5Gb/s), Gen 2 (5Gb/s), and Gen 3 (8Gb/s) jitter that are low in both clock synthesizers and phase-locked oscillators.

The design is comprised of few components that can be divided into three main areas. First, the I2C interface area that uses optoisolator to ensure the compatibility of the external I2C device to the main clock frequency synthesizer. Second, the main part where the IDT8T49N004I clock generator generates the clock with selectable LVDS or LVPECL outputs. Lastly, the power supply of the device uses a low noise Low DropOut (LDO) regulator that is optimized for fast transient response. It also makes use of reference diodes and capacitor filters that secure the system from possible noise produced from the supply.

The design is applicable to several applications that requires reference clock especially network processors and Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). It can improve the overall performance of the device since it makes the device more immune to noise and other undesired system behavior.

8T49N004 Programmable Femtoclock® NG with 4-outputs – [Link]

Nixie Tube Clock


by Pete Mills :

If you’ve poked around the internets where electronics hobbyists collect, it is likely that you are acutely aware of our incontrovertible affinity for building timekeeping clocks. It is similarly unlikely that you have been able to evade the plenitude of nixie tube based projects. There is a reason for this.

Nixie tubes are cool. They have great aesthetic appeal with their difficult-to-photograph, warm orange glow, and dem curvy numerals. They add an organic je ne sais quoi to a hobby with ostensibly digital design cues. Further, they pose technical challenges in the way of producing and switching the ~175 V DC needed to light each tube element. And as far as I am aware, there are no new nixie tubes being produced; as such, procurement can be a challenge unto itself. My N.O.S. nixies came from Russia thru Ebay, and only 3 were duds. Incidentally the seller replaced those 3, FOC.

Nixie Tube Clock – [Link]