Tag Archives: CMOS

2 Channel Relay Board

2_Channel_Relay_Board_PIC

2 channel Relay driver project can be controlled by feeding 2-12V trigger voltage, Very useful project for application like Micro-Controller based projects, Remote controller, Lamp on Off, and any circuits which required isolated high current and high voltage switching by applying any TTL or CMOS level voltage. Two LED works as operation indicator while in , 3 pins screw terminals to connect load and provides both normally open and normally closed switching.

Input: 12 VDC @ 84 mA
Output: Two SPDT relay
Relay specification: 5 A @ 230 VAC
Trigger level : 2 to 12 VDC
Header connector for connecting power and trigger voltage
LED on each channel indicates relay status
Power Battery Terminal (PBT) for easy relay output connection
Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
PCB dimensions 49 mm x 68 mm

2 Channel Relay Board – [Link]

CMOS Image Sensors Surpassing Moore’s Law

rcj_Image-Sensor_CMOS_3D_1

R. Colin Johnson @ eetimes.com:

PORTLAND, Ore. — Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imaging chips are becoming the industry’s leader in advanced process technology — instead of the traditional leaders (processors and memory) — thanks to strong demand for CMOS imaging chips in everything from smartphones to tablets to medical equipment and automobiles. Apparently, now the innovation surpasses Moore’s Law, says analyst firm Yole Développement.

Imaging was once done by film, but with the advent of solid-state sensors the technology breakthroughs seem to be growing exponentially, doubling with each new innovation (see slide 1), thus surpassing the traditional interpretation of Moore’s Law, argues Yole Développement (Lyon, France) in a new paper. Yole calls this effect “More than Moore.”

CMOS Image Sensors Surpassing Moore’s Law – [Link]

Clocked 8-bit random pattern generator for CMOS synth

finshed_pcb

by acidbourbon @ acidbourbon.wordpress.com:

Soon after I played around with some simple sequencers and multiplexers to generate more complex sound patterns. I thought it would be cool to have a device to gate oscillators or switch multiplexers with a random sequence. But the the output should change at a defined rate. Can we build a simple random pattern/number generator that works synchronized with an external clock signal? I believe so.

Clocked 8-bit random pattern generator for CMOS synth – [Link]

PCA8565 Application Circuit

The PCA8565 plays a very important role in the real time systems like digital clock, attendance system and tariff switching. In applications where timestamp is needed, PCA8565 real time clock is a good option. It provides the following benefits: low power consumption, allows the main system for time-critical tasks, and more accurate than other methods.

The PCA8565 is a CMOS real time clock and calendar optimized for low power consumption. A programmable clock output, interrupt output and voltage-low detector are also provided. All address and data are transferred serially via a two-line bidirectional I2C-bus with a maximum bus speed of 400kbps. The built-in word address register is incremented automatically after each written or read data byte. It provides a year, month, day, weekday, hours, minutes and seconds based on a 32.768kHz quartz crystal. It features alarm and timer functions, low current, and extended operating temperature range of -40 degrees Celsius to +125 degrees Celsius. It further contains an 8-bit year register that can hold values from 00 to 99 in BCD format, which also compensates for leap years, thus leap year is automatically corrected.

From the application circuit, the PCA8565 can be used to perform standard RTC functions, such as tracking the actual time and date, or acting as a reference timer. To support power management, the PCA8565 can be used to wake the microcontroller from hibernation mode. In systems that use a PLL, it can serve as a system reference clock for the PLL input. The PCA8565 can also be used as a watchdog timer, or as an activation timer to start measurements or initiate other functions.

PCA8565 Application Circuit – [Link]

Sensor enables low-light imaging for smart-phone cameras

ON Semi AR1335

by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

Based on 1.1-µm pixel technology, the AR1335 CMOS image sensor from ON Semiconductor provides 18% better sensitivity than previous-generation devices, along with increased quantum efficiency and linear well capacity to enable near-digital still-camera quality and low-light imaging on smart-phone cameras. The sensor’s pixel and color filter processing increase sensitivity, allowing more light to be captured to improve image quality, especially in low light.

The AR1335 offers crisp 13-Mpixel resolution with high-quality zoom and sharp reproduction of scene details. Professional video quality is supported through 4K ultra-high definition and cinema formats at 30 fps and full HD 1080P at 60 fps. On-chip camera functions include windowing, mirroring, column and row skip modes, and snapshot mode. In addition, a 32° chief ray angle makes the sensor suitable for low z-height applications.

The AR1335 is now in mass production in die format. It has been designed into several smart phone models, with availability in leading phones expected by the second quarter of 2015.

Sensor enables low-light imaging for smart-phone cameras – [Link]

I2C Temperature Sensor & Real Time Clock

83 total views, no views today

0

PCA8565TS

RTC or real-time clock is a kind of computer clock for keeping track of the recent or most current time. Commonly, RTCs are present in almost all or any device, which are electronic in nature that needs to keep time accurate. Meanwhile, temperature sensors are devices that gather data concerning the temperature from a source and convert it to a form that can be understood either by an observer or another device. These sensors can be in various forms and are used for a wide variety of purposes, from simple home use to extremely accurate and precise scientific use. They play a very important role almost everywhere that they are applied; knowing the temperature helps people to pick their clothing before a walk outside just as it helps chemists to understand the data collected from a complex chemical reaction.

The circuit uses a PCA8565 CMOS real time clock and calendar optimized for low power consumption. A programmable clock output, interrupt output and voltage-low detector are also provided. All address and data are transferred serially via a two-line bidirectional I2C-bus with a maximum bus speed of 400kbit/s. The built-in word address register is incremented automatically after each written or read data byte. It also includes a MCP9801 digital temperature sensor capable of reading temperatures from -55°C to +125°C. Temperature data is measured from an integrated temperature sensor and converted to digital word with a user selectable 9 to 12 bit Sigma Delta Analog to Digital Converter. The MCP9801 notifies the host controller when the ambient temperature exceeds a user programmed set point. The ALERT output is programmable as either a simple comparator for thermostat operation or as a temperature event interrupts. Communication with the sensor is accomplished via a two-wire bus that is compatible with industry standard protocols. This permits reading the current temperature, programming the set point and hysteresis and configuring the device. Address selection inputs allow up to eight MCP9801 sensors to share the same two-wire bus for multizone monitoring. Small physical size, low installed cost and ease of use make the MCP9801 an ideal choice for implementing sophisticated temperature system management schemes in a variety of applications.

The board is basically a carrier for the two IC’s that make up the Real Time Clock (RTC), PCA8565 and the Digital Temperature Sensor, MCP9801. It conveniently combines the two for applications that require RTC and temperature sensing. A particularly useful feature of this RTC is that it can detect power down and record the time at that event. This is ideal for connecting to a microcontroller that does not have an RTC.

I2C Temperature Sensor & Real Time Clock – [Link]

8 Channel Relay Board

8_Channel_Relay_Pic_th

8 Channel Relay Board is a simple and convenient way to interface 8 relays for switching application in your project. Input voltage level support TTL as well as CMOS. Easy interface with Microcontrollers based projects and analog circuits.

8 Channel Relay Board – [Link]

Nature inspires color-sensitive, CMOS-compatible photodetector

48 total views, no views today

0

color-sensitive-photodetector-cmos

By Richard Moss @ gizmag.com

Researchers at Rice University’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP) have developed a new image sensor that mimics the way we see color by integrating light amplifiers and color filters directly onto the pixels. The new design enables smaller, less complex, and more organic designs for CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors and other photodetectors used in cameras.

Conventional image sensors work by first converting light into electrical signals, then combining that information with the red, green, and blue color data determined by separate filters (or, especially in low-end cameras, a single filter array that uses a mosaic pattern to interpret colors). But this approach adds bulk to the sensor, and the filters gradually degrade under exposure to sunlight.

Nature inspires color-sensitive, CMOS-compatible photodetector – [Link]

Sony inspired by biomimicry develops curved CMOS sensors

sonyinspired

by Nancy Owano @ phys.org:

Sony’s advance in image sensors appears quite natural: the company has developed a set of curved CMOS image sensors based on the curvature of the eye. A report on the sensors in IEEE Spectrum said that, “in a bit of biomimicry,” Sony engineers were able to achieve a set of curved CMOS image sensors using a “bending machine” of their own construction.

Sony inspired by biomimicry develops curved CMOS sensors – [Link]

Integrated CMOS HART Modem

60 total views, no views today

0

ncn5193

by elektor.com:

On Semiconductor have introduced a highly integrated CMOS modem for applications running the Highway-Addressable, Remote Transducer (HART) communication standard for field instruments and masters. The NCN5193 requires minimal external passive components to provide the functions needed to satisfy HART physical layer requirements including modulation, demodulation, receive filtering, carrier detect, and transmit-signal shaping.

The NCN5193 also has an integrated DAC for low-BOM current loop slave transmitter implementation and employs phase-continuous frequency shift keying (FSK) at 1200 bits per second. To conserve power the receiver circuitry is disabled during transmit operations and vice versa. This meets the requirements of half-duplex operation used in HART communcations.

Integrated CMOS HART Modem – [Link]