Tag Archives: Controller

Simple, Cheap Motor Controller


by TeamJaeger @ instructables.com:

I’ve used this simple circuit several times to drive motors (like in my Stair Climbing robot) as well as solenoids. I originally picked it up from this instructable which is focused on controlling a solenoid. I wanted to isolate this circuit in its own Instructable as a motor driver so I could easily reference it from other future instructables and also provide example code to show how to use it in this manner.

Simple, Cheap Motor Controller – [Link]

Arduino Time-Lapse Panorama Controller


by oliverb @ instructables.com:

The Arduino controls a Geared Stepper Motor 28BYJ-48 via a ULN2003 Stepper Motor Driver Board. The 4×20 I2C LCD display and 5 micro switches form the interface to the Arduino. The controller has a Manfrotto 200PL-14 quick release tripod mount for attachment to my tripod and other mounting hardware fitted with a Manfrotto 323 Quick Release Clamp Adapter. Power is provided by a 50000mah USB Power Bank Battery Pack.

Arduino Time-Lapse Panorama Controller – [Link]

Arduino-based “Analog” slow cooker controller


Dan Ternes blogged about his Arduino-based controller for analog slow cookers:

With the AC power control figured out, I considered the User Interface. I opted for something simple. The Adafruit RGB LCD Shield would work well as it had both a display and buttons built in. Sure, I could have beat this project about the head and neck with “IoT”-this and “ESP8266″-that, but I was feeling lazy and just wanted a simple timer control. Of course, there’s nothing that says I won’t add some kind of wireless connectivity, but for now, local control is fine.

Arduino-based “Analog” slow cooker controller – [Link]

USB LCD Controller

This project is a USB Generic Human Interface Device (HID) device based on a PIC microcontroller. It is a USB interface for alphanumeric LCD display where the user as desired can program it. USB interface is implemented by using PIC18F2550 microcontroller ideal for low power (nanoWatt) and connectivity applications that benefit from the availability of three serial ports: FS-USB (12 Mbit/s), I2C and SPI (up to 10Mbit/s) and an asynchronous (LIN capable) serial port (EUSART). Large amounts of RAM memory for buffering and enhanced FLASH program memory make it ideal for embedded control and monitoring applications that require periodic connection with a (legacy free) personal computer via USB for data upload/download and/or firmware updates.

The hardware design is extremely simple. It can be build using the supplied PCB artwork or on a stripboard or breadboard. The circuit consists of a PIC18F2550 with a 20Mhz resonator and the required components for the LCD screen and the USB. The display is connected to the controller board using single strand wire. In addition, the contrast control potentiometer is placed underneath the board to allow easy adjustment after the LCD screen has been mounted.

USB LCD Controller is definitely useful since it can view various types of information taken from the PC such as temperature, time/date, MP3 song titles, emails, RSS feeds, all that LCD Smartie or other program supports. This provides ease in reading as well as accessing emails and songs in the playlist. Furthermore, the device can be easily constructed and reprogrammed, making it favorable to the users.

USB LCD Controller – [Link]

Oktopod: Dev Kit for Your Robo-ideas!


Oktopod Studio – Development Tools for Mechatronics, Robotics and Automation.

Oktopod Studio is a development platform for mechatronics, robotics and automation, which enables creating and controlling low voltage electronic devices, models and home applications /in an extremely simple way/.

Oktopod_Board presents a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which features plug and play inputs and outputs for connecting low voltage electronic devices, like: LED lights, DC & servo motors, electromagnets, switches, photo, temperature and magnetic sensors, and so on.

Oktopod: Dev Kit for Your Robo-ideas! – [Link]

Universal soldering controller


sparkybg shared his universal soldering controller:

The intention was to build the most universal soldering controller I can think of. It can drive any low voltage (upto 24V) iron with thermocouple or resistive sensor, in series with the heater, or separate.
Here is a short list of features:
– power: 9-28V, AC or DC
– 2 separate heater control channels
– 2 independent sensor inputs
– current source on any sensor input 3uA – 12mA, wuth 2 bands (x1, x16) and 256 steps per band
– flexible differential amplifier input selection
– amplifier gain from 0 to 750 in 256 steps
– negative offset selection in 1024 steps
– resistive instrument identification (upto 625 different instruments can be identified by 2 resistors on the connector)
– polynomial floating point voltage/resistance to temperature calculation
– wave shaping to filter out the inductive peaks from series sensor signal
– PID control with power limit
– isolated USB port for firmware updates and live data
– 128×64 OLED display with rich user interface.

Universal soldering controller – [Link]

Arduino DMX 512 Tester/Controller

Hardware v00

daniel3514 writes:

A tool to control and test light show controlled by the protocol DMX-512, ideal for quick tests on fixed or temporary installations of lighting. This project arises from the need to have a portable system for rapid testing in lighting installations, without the need to install lighting consoles, interfaces or computers in environments outside, hostile or difficult to access.

Arduino DMX 512 Tester/Controller – [Link]

The Gertbot Power Controller


by elektor.com:

The Gertbot board works as either a stand-alone power controller connected to a computer via a serial link and controlled from Windows or as a plug-in to the Raspberry Pi environment. It has four channels each capable of driving 30 V at 2.5 A and can drive both capacitive and inductive loads. Besides four H-bridges the board also has two open drain N-MOSFETS which can sink 3 A at 30 V. The board is primarily targeted to drive stepper motors, brushed motors and other robotic hardware but it will be just as much at home controlling power in other applications. The outputs have short-circuit and thermal protection.

The Gertbot Power Controller – [Link]

Using the STM6600, STM6601 smart push-button on/off controller


An app note(PDF) on smart on/off controller and voltage monitoring chip from STMicroelectronics.

These devices allow easy and safe control of applications run with one or two push-buttons by securely starting or powering down a system and also resetting the processor or disabling power in case of a non-responding application (e.g. code in a dead loop). This makes the STM660x devices suitable for a broad spectrum of applications such as terminals, audio and video players, smartphones, PDAs, PCs, or any portable device.


Using the STM6600, STM6601 smart push-button on/off controller – [Link]

Bike Light Controller Re-Design

new controller

by jptds.blogspot.co.uk:

It’s not often that I finish the various small projects I undertake. Tesla coils, mass spectrometers, automated tomato plant watering systems, homebrew heaters have all been conceived and sometimes parts bought and assembled with some even making it as far as working. This project however made it all the way to finished.

Bike Light Controller Re-Design – [Link]