Tag Archives: Counter

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter


by paulindallas @ instructables.com:

Last Black Friday, the big sale day that comes right after Thanksgiving, I came across a sale on the Electronic Goldmine web site for a Geiger counter kit and tube for about $30. Now I always wanted to play with a Geiger counter, even as a kid back in the 50’s when Uranium, nuclear power, mutant radioactive ants (the movie “THEM” 1954) etc. were all the rage. I figured I was not getting any younger, so I bought it.

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter – [Link]

Frequency counter using arduino


by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

Many guys here were asking for a frequency counter and at last I got enough time to make one. This frequency counter using arduino is based on the UNO version and can count up to 40KHz. A 16×2 LCD display is used for displaying the frequency count. The circuit has minimum external components and directly counts the frequency. Any way the amplitude of the input frequency must not be greater than 5V. If you want to measure signals over than 5V, additional limiting circuits have to be added and i will show it some other time. Now just do it with 5V signals.

Frequency counter using arduino – [Link]

8MHz Frequency Counter


Harrymatic @ instructables.com writes:

I am in the process of designing a function generator and I needed a frequency counter to check it against. This project uses a minimal number of components for a very economical and compact design. A bare-bones Arduino clone is at the heart of this project and the measured frequency is shown on an LCD display. The maximum frequency that this can measure is about 8 MHz (at a 50% duty cycle). Despite the fact that this counts the frequency on one of the digital pins, I have found that it will quite happily measure sine and triangle waves providing that they have a suitable amplitude.

8MHz Frequency Counter – [Link]

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station

Radmon - inside and outside

sites.google.com/site/diygeigercounter writes:

This project measures the background radiation outside the house, and transmits it to a display station inside the house. The outside sensing unit is solar powered (but it doesn’t have to be), and should have a range of at least 50m. The display station inside the house continuously displays the current background, and logs it to an SD card (along with date / time, temperature and other data). Daily high counts and other information are also displayed.

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station – [Link]

With the Hameg 8000 series devices you always have on a table all you need

A modular system of laboratory devices Hameg 8000 series is an ideal system for testing workplaces and school laboratories. At the same time it enables a very effective usage of space.

To have all we need on a table and to maintain enough space for a work – it is a stable challenge at a work with electronics. We may say, that for example a generator won´t be on my table today. But as it uses to be, after a while we´ll find we need just that instrument, which is missing on a table. Sometimes a solution is to stock them at each other, but we usually face the problem with a different size of instruments, or eventually also an instability of such a “set

150MHz PIC Frequency Counter

Sergei Bezrukov writes:

My goal was to design a simple and user-friendly frequency counter which would be capable to handle radio FM frequencies and have an autonomous power supply. Powering it from batteries benefits to the device portability and makes working with it more convenient by eliminating a mess of power cords in a home lab. I use it just occasionally and a small size is a bonus simplifying its storage in a table drawer.

Most of similar devices I have found on the Internet use an LCD module with a built-in controller. Such a device draws pretty much current. Also, many high-speed counters use power-hungry ICs which makes it difficult for a battery operation. Finally, many projects are poorly documented which makes any modification unnecessary difficult. So, I started my own design which uses modern high speed and low-power ICs and can work from a single AA cell.

150MHz PIC Frequency Counter – [Link]

Fast Frequency Counter – [Link]

60 Mhz Frequency Meter / counter

circuitvalley.com writes:

This is 60 MHz frequency meter / counter for measuring frequency from 10 Hz to 60 MHz with 10 Hz resolution.It is a very useful bench test equipment for testing and finding out the frequency of various devices with unknown frequency such as oscillators, radio receivers, transmitters, function generators, crystals, etc. The meter provides very stable readings and has excellent input sensitivity thanks to on board amplifier and TTL converter, so it can even measure weak signals from crystal oscillators. With the addition of prescaller it is possible to measure the frequency of 1GHz and above.

60 Mhz Frequency Meter / counter – [Link]

WikiSensor turns your iPhone into a Geiger counter

redferret.net writes:

For most of us, the threat of radiation poisoning is not something we often think of. However, there is always the possibility that some catastrophic incident will put some of us in danger. Now, I don’t know about you, but I can’t recall the last time I’ve seen my Geiger counter. So how do you tell if the area is unsafe? As it turns out, you can use your iPhone.

Don’t get me wrong, you really shouldn’t trust your phone as a completely reliable source of information regarding radiation levels. However, in a pinch, it can tell you enough to let you know if there is a danger. You see, the CMOS sensor doesn’t just record the light visible to your own eye, it can also capture Gamma and X waves emitted by radioactive sources. With the WikiSensor Dosimeter, you just cover the iPhone’s front camera with black tape, and run the program. The black tape prevents any light from traditional sources from being captured, yet still lets though the waves mentioned above. If these waves are recorded, then the software will let you know, and give you an idea of the risk. If you live in an area where you might be exposed to radiation at some point, this might be worth the $.99 price.

WikiSensor turns your iPhone into a Geiger counter – [Link]