Tag Archives: Counter

Fluke/Philips PM66xx Frequency Counter OCXO Upgrade

pm6674_ocxoupg_revb

In this post Dan Watson documents an OCXO upgrade board he designed for the Fluke/Philips PM66xx line of frequency counters.

A few months ago I purchased a Philips PM6674 frequency counter on eBay. It’s an older 9 digit counter with two channels that has a maximum input frequency of 550MHz. The design feels dated compared to more modern counters, such as my Agilent 53131A.

Fluke/Philips PM66xx Frequency Counter OCXO Upgrade – [Link]

UP/DOWN counter with memory using PIC16F88

counter39

Here is an up-down counter based on PIC16F88 and 7-segment display. The counter is using SMD components and features a RS-232 interface.

This is a simple digital counter with a serial rs-232 and a 7 segment display, i started this project to count items on some shelfs, but it can be used for anything, it is also, for the exception of the connectors, completely on SMD components.

UP/DOWN counter with memory using PIC16F88 – [Link]

100MHZ Frequency Counter with PIC16F628A

FreqCounter16F628ALCD1-1024x906

This project shows how to build a very simple yet very useful tool that every DIY enthusiast should have in his lab: a 100MHz+ frequency counter.

The schematic is fairly simple and straightforward and uses a PIC16F628A microcontroller for measuring frequency and a high speed comparator for signal amplification and conditioning.

The microcontroller uses its internal 4MHz oscillator for the CPU clock. Timer1 uses an external crystal resonator (watch crystal) with 32768Hz frequency for setting the 1 second time base.

Timer0 is used to count the input signal at pin RA4.

100MHZ Frequency Counter with PIC16F628A – [Link]

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter

FC90HM7IG2JI9LS.MEDIUM

by paulindallas @ instructables.com:

Last Black Friday, the big sale day that comes right after Thanksgiving, I came across a sale on the Electronic Goldmine web site for a Geiger counter kit and tube for about $30. Now I always wanted to play with a Geiger counter, even as a kid back in the 50’s when Uranium, nuclear power, mutant radioactive ants (the movie “THEM” 1954) etc. were all the rage. I figured I was not getting any younger, so I bought it.

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter – [Link]

Frequency counter using arduino

frequency-meter-using-arduino

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

Many guys here were asking for a frequency counter and at last I got enough time to make one. This frequency counter using arduino is based on the UNO version and can count up to 40KHz. A 16×2 LCD display is used for displaying the frequency count. The circuit has minimum external components and directly counts the frequency. Any way the amplitude of the input frequency must not be greater than 5V. If you want to measure signals over than 5V, additional limiting circuits have to be added and i will show it some other time. Now just do it with 5V signals.

Frequency counter using arduino – [Link]

8MHz Frequency Counter

FIR5FBYH994XHQO.LARGE

Harrymatic @ instructables.com writes:

I am in the process of designing a function generator and I needed a frequency counter to check it against. This project uses a minimal number of components for a very economical and compact design. A bare-bones Arduino clone is at the heart of this project and the measured frequency is shown on an LCD display. The maximum frequency that this can measure is about 8 MHz (at a 50% duty cycle). Despite the fact that this counts the frequency on one of the digital pins, I have found that it will quite happily measure sine and triangle waves providing that they have a suitable amplitude.

8MHz Frequency Counter – [Link]

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station

Radmon - inside and outside

sites.google.com/site/diygeigercounter writes:

This project measures the background radiation outside the house, and transmits it to a display station inside the house. The outside sensing unit is solar powered (but it doesn’t have to be), and should have a range of at least 50m. The display station inside the house continuously displays the current background, and logs it to an SD card (along with date / time, temperature and other data). Daily high counts and other information are also displayed.

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station – [Link]

With the Hameg 8000 series devices you always have on a table all you need

A modular system of laboratory devices Hameg 8000 series is an ideal system for testing workplaces and school laboratories. At the same time it enables a very effective usage of space.

To have all we need on a table and to maintain enough space for a work – it is a stable challenge at a work with electronics. We may say, that for example a generator won´t be on my table today. But as it uses to be, after a while we´ll find we need just that instrument, which is missing on a table. Sometimes a solution is to stock them at each other, but we usually face the problem with a different size of instruments, or eventually also an instability of such a “set