Tag Archives: display



Digital Panel Meter performs digital processing on or conversion and display of voltages, currents, other analog signals, and pulse signals. This project is based on popular ICL 7107 IC, which is analog to digital converter and has been designed to drive 7 segment LED display. The ICL7107 is high performance, low power, 3, 1/3 digit A/D converter. Included are seven segment decoders, display drivers, a reference, and a clock. This DPM project may be used in a wide variety of configurations Full scale reading of +/- 199.9mV (200mV)


  • Supply 5V DC @ 80mA.
  • Range 0 to 199.9mV (200mV)
  • Low Current consumption
  • Low input leakage current because external reference
  • Single supply operation
  • On board Jumpers for range display
  • Auto Zero and auto polarity within IC
  • Supply Input CN2 5V DC
  • Test Voltage CN1 0-200mV
  • PR1 Preset for reading calibration.

Digital Panel Meter – Voltmeter – [Link]

Building a SmartWatch


Benjamin Blundell has been working on his DIY smart-watch:

I have an issue with smart-watches. Watches in general fall into one of two categories: a tool to tell the time, or a fashion statement. Increasingly, I believe the latter category is larger than the first. With the advent of the iWatch, Pebble and the like, fashion and making a statement has moved into technology. It’s not quite a new thing but nevertheless, it’s something I’m not too fond of. My solution? Make your own smartwatch.
There is a precedent for this. Steve Wozniack sports a pretty fly nixie tube watch which he made himself. It’s pretty cool, but also a statement of sorts too. I’ve been meaning to up my game with electronics anyway, so I’ve been working on a few initial prototypes.

Building a SmartWatch – [Link]

Wrist Mount Digital Altimeter

This project is a simple wrist mount digital altimeter which is a device used to determine altitude. This design uses atmospheric pressure to calculate the altitude of its location. The lower the atmospheric pressure, the higher the altitude. The project is comprised of a microcontroller (MCU), an 84×84 pixel graphic LCD and a barometric pressure sensor.

The barometric pressure sensor used in the design is the MS560702BA03-50 from TE Connectivity Measurement Specialties. It consists of a piezo-resistive sensor and a sensor interface IC. Its main function is to convert the uncompensated analogue output voltage from the piezo-resistive pressure sensor to a 24-bit digital value, as well as providing a 24-bit digital value for the temperature of the sensor. It is optimized for altimeters and variometers with an altitude resolution of 20cm. The MS560702BA03-50 measures the atmospheric pressure on its location then converts it to a 24-bit value through its internal ADC. The sensor reading is then transmitted to the MCU through SPI. Then the MCU calculates the altitude by using the pressure reading. The calibration of an altimeter follows the equation z = cT log (Po /P), where c is a constant, T is the absolute temperature, P is the pressure at altitude z, and Po is the pressure at sea level. The calculated altitude is then displayed through an 84×84 pixel graphic LCD which is mostly found on old phones. The circuit is powered through a 3.3V battery.

The altimeter is used to aid navigation and is mostly used in skydiving, mountaineering and hiking applications. It is usually hand-held or in wrist-mount form for the ease of use. Altimeters can also be found in aircrafts such as planes and helicopters and others that needs altitude indication.

Wrist Mount Digital Altimeter – [Link]

LED Wave Display


by 17bhuey @ instructables.com:

In order to create this project, many physical materials are necessary, a lot of which will not be found lying around at home. In order to do this project, you should go out to computer stores or look online for these products. Keep in mind that you can upgrade to larger LED boards or faster arduinos, but that would require some modification of this tutorial as the coding, wiring, etc, changes with the addition of different products. Overall, this project is a fun way for you to practice your engineering, circuitry, and computer science skills while making a device that shows off your music taste in a new light.

LED Wave Display – [Link]

ATtiny85 and SSD1306 wearable display


by AwesomePCB @ instructables.com:

How to make wearable display – OLED SSD1306 display run by ATtiny85

Step by step tutorial, with no steps to skip.

The main goal of this tutorial is to show how to make wearable display run by Attiny85 and OLED display SDD1306.

Due to running campaign for ATtiny25/45/85 PCB TINY CHEAP VERSATILE Arduino compatible on Indiegogo I did prototype of wearable display base on natural leather, to show what is possible with ATtiny25/45/85 PCB.

ATtiny85 and SSD1306 wearable display – [Link]

Tiny Message Board


by tareker @ instructables.com:

We will make a tiny connected message board with a 0.96″ OLED display that can be controlled from your phone. We will use the IFTTT “DO” app to set and clear the reminder so that no extra hardware will be required besides the OLED display. In addition to the reminder, our tiny message board can display 3 other lines, which we will use to display the daily weather temperature forecast and a surf report, which will be pushed via a couple of IFTTT recipes.

Tiny Message Board – [Link]

Experiments with 2.4″ TFT


Rui Cabral tipped us with his latest project. He writes:

Lately I’ve been testing a small 2.4″ TFT display PBC ILI9341 with touch and bought on ebay for less than 8euros!

This graphic display is an excellent solution for both small projects and for more advanced projects since it includes SD card connector to access stored images.

This display has a resolution of 240×320 RGB.

Experiments with 2.4″ TFT – [Link]

Building the Colossus LED Display

by Adam Haile @ maniacallabs.com:

The 2014 NC Maker Faire was a huge turning point for Maniacal Labs. It was there that the idea for the AllPixel and what is now BiblioPixel got their start. It’s also where we showed off our first custom-built LED display, the 24×24 LPD8806 matrix. At nearly 24 inches square, and 1 pixel per inch, it was certainly impressive. But we left the Maker Faire with a desire to go bigger. Not just more pixels… but physically larger. Much larger. We call it “Colossus”.

Building the Colossus LED Display – [Link]