Tag Archives: display

Building the Colossus LED Display

by Adam Haile @ maniacallabs.com:

The 2014 NC Maker Faire was a huge turning point for Maniacal Labs. It was there that the idea for the AllPixel and what is now BiblioPixel got their start. It’s also where we showed off our first custom-built LED display, the 24×24 LPD8806 matrix. At nearly 24 inches square, and 1 pixel per inch, it was certainly impressive. But we left the Maker Faire with a desire to go bigger. Not just more pixels… but physically larger. Much larger. We call it “Colossus”.

Building the Colossus LED Display – [Link]

Multi Channel Datalogger with OLED Display


by Jed Hodson @ prototypingcorner.me:

A 3 Channel Datalogger Powered by the LinkIt One. This device can log data from 2 Analog Inputs and 1 Digital Input / Output with PWM capabilities. The Device syncs time from GPS and makes use of the on-board battery to make it become even more portable. With an OLED Display to show system information and live data feed, along with the option to force an update all controlled via the 1 Button. The data file is stored on the LinkIt One’s internal storage and saved as a CSV file so it can easily be read by a text editor or a more powerful program (such as Excel). Fully Customizable and with room to expand all via the software that makes it run.

Multi Channel Datalogger with OLED Display – [Link]

Plug-in touchscreen makes a Raspberry Pi tablet


by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Distributor element14 has a 7-in. Touchscreen Display for the Raspberry Pi, expanding the ecosystem of accessories, to enable users to create all-in-one integrated projects such as turning their Pi into a tablet, infotainment system or embedded project.

Compatible with Raspberry Pi 2, and Raspberry Pi 1 models B+ and A+*, the screen can be used to make ‘Internet of Things’ (IoT) devices with a visual display. Connect the Raspberry Pi, develop a Python script, and create home automation devices with touchscreen capability. A range of educational software and programs available on the Raspberry Pi will be touch enabled, making learning and programming easier.

Designed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation, the 800 × 480 display connects to the Raspberry Pi’s DSI display connector via an adapter board that handles power and signal conversion. Touchscreen drivers with support for 10-finger touch and an on-screen keyboard will be integrated into the latest Raspbian OS for full functionality without the need for a physical keyboard or mouse.

Plug-in touchscreen makes a Raspberry Pi tablet – [Link]

EA DOGS displays – small by size, big by features


Minimum power consumption, very good legibility and a lot of versions – these are the EA DOG displays.

When we speak about “versions” – in case of EADOG from company Electronic Assembly it means a lot of “glass” types (STM, FSTN, transflective,…) and what is unique – many s display + backlight combinations. Right thanks to this unique possibility to make your own combination display + backlight according to your needs make the EADOG series so versatile. We can find here extraordinarily thin and compact graphic and character displays:

  • 1×8 – 2×16 – 3×16 for +5V or +3.3V power supply
  • 4×10/2×10 – 4×20 for +3.3V
  • Graphic 102×32 .. 240×128 for +3.3V

Character displays are with the SPI interface, some are also with I2C, and 4/8 bit. Simple 3,3V or 5V power supply further simplifies their usage.
In the EADOG family can be found „S“, „M“, „L“ and „XL“ series (EADOGS, EADOGM,…). The smallest one – EADOGS is suitable even for miniature applications, where a place is precious, but still a display is desirable or necessary there. On stock we keep three graphic versions 102*64 px with 33,6*23,4 mm active area. The newest member in the family of these small displays is the EA DOGS104-A character display (4×10 with a small font or 2×10 with a big font), while the character height may be changed by software. EA DOGS104-A is in standard equipped with 3 character sets (EN, EU, cyrilic).

The easiest way how to start development is to use the EA 9780-3USB development board.

EA DOGS displays – small by size, big by features – [Link]

Raspberry Pi OLED Internet Bandwidth Display


by Archie500 @ instructables.com:

In a very brief summary it works as follows: The Raspberry Pi uses SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) to get the WAN data rates from the router and then displays these graphically on the OLED screen.

The Raspberry Pi was already set up as our media player and is next to the television. The OLED display was inexpensive and can be bought from a number of places including eBay.

Raspberry Pi OLED Internet Bandwidth Display – [Link]

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build


Andy build an android reflow controller based on ATMega8L . He writes:

Welcome to the never ending saga of Andy and his reflow controllers. About a year ago I published a project writeup showing how I built a PID-based reflow controller. It featured a 640×360 graphical LCD from the Sony U5 Vivaz mobile phone and was all-surface mount. It worked well and continues to serve me well to this day but I always thought that there were improvements that I could make in several areas.

Firstly, there’s no reason why it should have been all surface-mount. The LCD in particular has a 0.4mm connector that many people will find very hard to solder by hand. After all, presumably you’re building a reflow controller to help solve that very problem. Chicken and egg.

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build – [Link]

µGFX – embedded library for Displays and Touchscreens


µGFX is a library to interface all kinds of different displays and touchscreens to embedded devices. The main goal of the project is it to provide a set of feature rich tools like a complete GUI toolkit while keeping the system requirements at a minimum.

µGFX can either be run on top of an operating system like ChibiOS/RT, FreeRTOS and many others or on a bare-metal system.

The library is entirely written in C. It can be used in C++ applications without any modifications.
It’s free to use without any usage restrictions for non-commercial products and open hardware projects. Commercial licenses are available at low prices.

µGFX – embedded library for Displays and Touchscreens – [Link]

Writing a python module to simulate a LCD

Screenshot (173)

by Prashant Mohta:

So recently I got a Raspberry pi and a 16×2 character LCD screen , I thought , lets make a simple game that can be played on the lcd. my first instinct was to code directly for the lcd on the pi , but as I started coding I realized that the clutter of having the lcd connected wasn’t really necessary while i am programming the game’s logic .

I decided to make a python module that gives me the lcd output on my monitor , this way i no longer need to work with my lcd connected and can even code the game on my laptop and test the results quickly . Moreover once im done with the coding , i can simply replace the module code , for the lcd control code , and my game is ready to deploy.

Writing a python module to simulate a LCD – [Link]