Tag Archives: display

Gen 4D System LCD Touchscreen Display for the Raspberry

The gen4-4DPi range of LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) touchscreen modules was recently released by 4D Systems. The modules support the Raspberry family of single board computers (SBCs), which means that the modules work with all versions of the raspberry that supports the 40-pin header which includes Pi A+, B+, Pi2, Pi3, Pi3B, Pi Zero and Pi Zero W. The display will serve as the primary output of the Raspberry Pi, and they come in three different screen sizes which are 4.3-inch, 5.0-inch and a 7.0-inch.

Projecting from the Raspberry Pi has mostly been with the use of the HDMI connection to an external monitor or through the official Raspberry pi touch display which comes only in 7-inch display size and supports 800 x 600 display resolution. The 4D System is expected to provide different display size options to the user. The 4.3 sized screen has a 480×272 resolution while the 5.0 and 7.0 screen sizes have an 800×480 resolution.

The gen4-4DPi range connects to the Raspberry Pi’s 40 pin header using the gen4-4DPi Adaptor, which then connects to the gen4-4DPi display module using a 30-way FFC Cable. The adapter board conforms to the Raspberry Pi expansion header pin-out and Pi’s HAT device identification standard.

The communication between the gen4-4DPI display and the Raspberry Pi is through a high speed 48MHz SPI connection which is made possible by an onboard processor and also features a customized DMA enabled kernel, a combination that allows the display to output high frame rate as compared to other SPI display solutions.

The Gen4 display is designed for the Raspbian operating system and is capable of working with other applications like Pixel and Scratch. The module is built with a capacitive or resistive touch control options depending on the variant. There are 4*4.0mm mounting holes on the resistive touch modules and adhesive on the bezel for the capacitive touch modules. This simply means then a person can mount the gen4-4DPi by using the mounting holes for the resistive touch modules or through the adhesive provided on the Cover Lens Bezel (CLB) for the capacitive touch modules.

The following are some of the features of the Gen4 Displays

  • The range is RoHS and CE compliant.
  • The modules are a universal primary display for the raspberry pi.
  • There are resistive touch display modules which also have a capacitive touch version.
  • The resistive modules come with a TFT Screen with integrated 4-wire Resistive Touch Panel (T), while the capacitive versions have a Capacitive Touch Panel (CT) with Cover Lens Bezel (CLB).

The Gen4 Display comes in six different variants as shown below:

  • gen4-4DPi – 43T: This 4.3inch variant cost $49.95
  • gen4-4DPi -43CT – CLB: This 4.3inch variant cost $59.95
  • gen4-4DPi – 50T: This 5inch variant cost $65.95
  • gen4-4DPi – 50CT – CLB: This 5inch variant cost $69.95
  • gen4-4DPi – 70T: This 7inch variant cost $75.95
  • gen4-4DPi – 70CT – CLB: This 7inch variant cost $79.95

More information about the product is available on the product page. The product is also available for purchase on Digikey here with a slightly higher price.

Using Waveshare 4.3″ E-paper Display with Arduino

Screen technologies have evolved over the years since the cathode ray tube was first demonstrated in 1897, we have moved from plasma to LCDs, followed by LEDs, OLEDs, and more recently e-paper which is what we will look into today. Electronic paper/e-paper displays are display devices which were created to mimic the appearance of ink on a common paper. Unlike the other kind of displays which emit light, e-paper displays reflect light just like an ordinary paper. This gives e-paper displays a wider viewing angle, ensure they consume less power and makes looking at them easier as it gives the same feel as looking at an ordinary paper without the glare that comes from looking at a screen. The coolest feature of this display is its ability to display the last text or graphics uploaded to it even when it is not connected to power. This helps save a lot of power and is the key feature for most applications for which e-paper displays are deployed.

The popularity of e-paper displays is on the rise (used in Amazon’s Kindle) due to the unique features mentioned above, that’s why, for this tutorial, we will look at how to use e-paper displays in Arduino projects, to give the projects an extra layer of sophistication and coolness.

Using Waveshare 4.3″ E-paper Display with Arduino – [Link]

Using the 3.2″ HX8357B Color TFT Display with Arduino

3.2″ Color TFT Display

Hi guys, welcome to another Arduino tutorial. Today, I will be showing you how to use the 3.2″color TFT display with Arduino.

The display demand for every project is unique, a project may require just a simple, single color OLED display, while another project may require something bigger, all based on the function the display is to perform. For this reason, as a maker or electronics hobbyist, anyone needs to know how to work with as many displays as possible, that’s why today, we will take a look at how to use the super cheap, 3.2″ color TFT display with Arduino.

Using the 3.2″ HX8357B Color TFT Display with Arduino – [Link]

Using the 1.44″ Color TFT display (ILI9163C) with Arduino

ILI9163C 1.44″ TFT Display

Hi guys, over the past few tutorials, we have been discussing TFT displays, how to connect and use them in Arduino projects, especially the 1.8″ Colored TFT display. In a similar way, we will look at how to use the 1.44″ TFT Display (ILI9163C) with the Arduino.

The ILI9163C based 1.44″ colored TFT Display, is a SPI protocol based display with a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels. It’s capable of displaying up to 262,000 different colors. The module can be said to be a sibling to the 1.8″ TFT display, except for the fact that it is much faster and has a better, overall cost to performance ratio when compared with the 1.8″ TFT display. Some of the features of the display are listed below;

  • Size: 1.44 inch
  • Interface: SPI
  • Resolution: 128*128 pixel
  • Visual area: 1:1 square
  • TFT color screen, the effect is far better than other small CSTN screen
  • Drive IC: ILI9163
  • Fully compatible and alternative 5110 interface
  • Onboard LDO, support 5V/3.3V input voltage, the LED backlight, 3.3V input

For this tutorial, we will focus on demonstrating how to use this display with Arduino to display texts, shapes and Images.

Using the 1.44″ Color TFT display (ILI9163C) with Arduino – [Link]

Using the ST7735 1.8″ Color TFT Display with Arduino

1.8″ Colored TFT Display

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. Today, we will look on how to use the 1.8″ ST7735  colored TFT display with Arduino. The past few tutorials have been focused on how to use the Nokia 5110 LCD display extensively but there will be a time when we will need to use a colored display or something bigger with additional features, that’s where the 1.8″ ST7735 TFT display comes in.

The ST7735 TFT display is a 1.8″ display with a resolution of 128×160 pixels and can display a wide range of colors ( full 18-bit color, 262,144 shades!). The display uses the SPI protocol for communication and has its own pixel-addressable frame buffer which means it can be used with all kinds of microcontroller and you only need 4 i/o pins. To complement the display, it also comes with an SD card slot on which colored bitmaps can be loaded and easily displayed on the screen.

Using the ST7735 1.8″ Color TFT Display with Arduino – [Link]

Displaying Customized Graphics on OLED display using Arduino

One thing we all always wish we could do when using any display is to load our own custom graphics, be it a logo, gif etc. In today’s tutorial we will show how to do just that on an OLED display using an Arduino.

OLED (organic light-emitting diode) display is a display based on light-emitting diode (LED) in which the emissive electroluminescent layer is a film of organic compound that emits light in response to an electric current. This layer of organic semiconductor is situated between two electrodes; typically, at least one of these electrodes is transparent. OLEDs are used to create digital displays in devices such as television screens, computer monitors, portable systems such as mobile phones, handheld game consoles, and PDAs. OLED displays do not require a backlight because they emit visible light and can thus, display deep black levels and be thinner and lighter than a liquid crystal display (LCD).

Displaying Customized Graphics on OLED display using Arduino – [Link]

PaPiRus Netapp – Monitor your network with Raspberry Pi

Use PiSupply’s PaPiRus ePaper display to monitor your network with a Raspberry Pi.

Over the past few days I have been converting my “Speedtest-cron” code to work on the PaPiRus from PiSupply. Whilst going over the code, I decided to start a new Git Repository and rename this version to “PaPiRus Netapp”.

PaPiRus Netapp – Monitor your network with Raspberry Pi – [Link]

Arduino distance meter with Ultrasonic Sensor (HC SR04) and Nokia 5110 LCD display

Ultrasonic Sensor

Measuring distance is so important in today’s world that things like driverless cars will be impossible without it, that description is probably enough to describe how important knowing the distance between two objects can be. For that reason, today we will be building a distance meter using the Arduino and the HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor.

The HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor is a cheap ranging sensor capable of measuring a distance between 20 – 400cm without contact and at an accuracy of up to 3mm. The sensor is made up of a transmitter and receiver with operating frequency of around 40khz. It uses the echo principle for distance measurement by emitting an ultrasonic wave of 40khz. If there is an object in its path, the emitted wave is reflected and the reflected signal is received via the receiver. The time elapsed between the transmission of the signal and the reception of the echo is then used to determine the distance between the sensor and an object in its path.

Arduino distance meter with Ultrasonic Sensor (HC SR04) and Nokia 5110 LCD display – [Link]

ESP32 E-Paper Thermometer with a DS18B20 Sensor

Our friends on educ8s.tv published a new video. Check it out.

In this ESP32 project video, we are going to use an E-Paper display and a DS18B20 temperature sensor to build a low-power thermometer. We are going to use the Arduino IDE to program to ESP32 board. ! It is a very easy project to build. It won’t take us more than 5 minutes so let’s get started!

ESP32 E-Paper Thermometer with a DS18B20 Sensor – [Link]

Arduino E-Paper Display Review ( Waveshare 1.54″)

Our friends at educ8s.tv uploaded a new video. It’s about Waveshare 1.54″ e-paper display:

Dear friends welcome to this Arduino E-Paper display tutorial. In this video, we are going use this small e-paper display with Arduino for the first time and talk about its advantages and disadvantages.

Arduino E-Paper Display Review ( Waveshare 1.54″) – [Link]