Tag Archives: dot-matrix

Universal 1.2″ LED dot matrix display

57 total views, no views today

0

We incorporated among standard stock types the dot matrix LED display Kingbright TC12-11 with the height of 30.6mm. Hyper red color (630nm) and a high luminous intensity provide a contrast image.

TC12-11SRWA with 5×7 dots can be conveniently used especially in indoor applications, where it will provide an excellent readability at various ambient light conditions. Display can also be used for outdoor applications, excluding places on a direct sunlight, where the display legibility can be substantially decreased.

High light output, typically 82mCd/10mA and white diffused lens ensure a very good visibility even from higher viewing angles. Display features almost a linear luminous intensity / current characteristics in a range from 0 to 20mA, that´s why it is fully usable even for low power applications. Similarly like almost all dot matrix displays, even TC12-11 is designed in a way that when placed in a row, we will obtain a continuous row with homogenous spacing between dots. That´s why it is possible to display even symbols wider than 5 points and naturally a moving text.

TC12-11 has a common cathode (in a column), available are also versions with a common anode (in a row) and also various colour versions.

Universal 1.2″ LED dot matrix display – [Link]

Universal 1.2" LED dot matrix display

56 total views, no views today

0

We incorporated among standard stock types the dot matrix LED display Kingbright TC12-11 with the height of 30.6mm. Hyper red color (630nm) and a high luminous intensity provide a contrast image.

TC12-11SRWA with 5×7 dots can be conveniently used especially in indoor applications, where it will provide an excellent readability at various ambient light conditions. Display can also be used for outdoor applications, excluding places on a direct sunlight, where the display legibility can be substantially decreased.

High light output, typically 82mCd/10mA and white diffused lens ensure a very good visibility even from higher viewing angles. Display features almost a linear luminous intensity / current characteristics in a range from 0 to 20mA, that´s why it is fully usable even for low power applications. Similarly like almost all dot matrix displays, even TC12-11 is designed in a way that when placed in a row, we will obtain a continuous row with homogenous spacing between dots. That´s why it is possible to display even symbols wider than 5 points and naturally a moving text.

TC12-11 has a common cathode (in a column), available are also versions with a common anode (in a row) and also various colour versions.

Universal 1.2″ LED dot matrix display – [Link]

Scrolling text message on an LED dot-matrix display

A couple of weeks ago, Embedded Lab posted a very basic tutorial on interfacing LED dot matrix to microcontroller (http://www.electronics-lab.com/blog/?p=11327) where the technique of displaying static characters was explained. They have recently posted the second part of that tutorial but now describing the method of scrolling characters on LED dot matrix.

Scrolling text message on an LED dot-matrix display – [Link]

 

Arduino: 24 hours digital clock

This is an Arduino powered 24-hour digital clock that uses the RTC chip DS1307 for timekeeping. DS1307 has a small battery backup so that it keeps the correct time even the rest of the circuit is not powered. The time is displayed on 5×7 LED dot matrix. [via]

Arduino: 24 hours digital clock – [Link]

Dot matrix LED running display

The device comprises two parts: LED control board and LED display board. The two PCBs are designed to fit together one behind the other using two sets of dual row connectors and 4 spacers. One of this connector is used for the electrical connections, while the other is only used as a mechanical connecting element.

Dot matrix LED running display – [Link]

Two player 5×7 dot matrix pong game

138 total views, no views today

0

avr_pong.jpg

This is a classic pong game assembled on a breadboard. Each of two players have to control bouncer with two buttons connected to Atmega16 microcontroller. If player fails to catch the ball – opponent gets score. This is more fun, than real game, but this is good material on learning LED dot matrix control using time multiplexing and this way creating illusion of moving picture. You can watch the video of game action here.

Two player 5×7 dot matrix pong game – [Link]