Tag Archives: epaper

2.9″ ESPaper Lite Kit for $39.90

The 2.9″ ESPaper Lite Kit contains most of the parts you need to display data over wifi:

With the 2.9″ ESPaper module you can display data retrieved over WiFi on an ePaper with little effort. The integrated ESP8266 Wroom-02 module updates the 296×128 B&W ePaper display over the SPI bus. The module also features a charging circuit for LiPo batteries and a JST connector which allows you to run the module for weeks or even months from a battery. How long the module can be run from battery mostly depends on the update frequency and the battery capacity. In tests we could run the module from a 800mAh LiPo battery for several weeks by updating weather information every 20 minutes.

2.9″ ESPaper Lite Kit for $39.90 – [Link]

Paperino, The ePaper Display Shield

ePaper displays  (EPDs) are becoming a trend in application, just like the display used in Amazon Kindle,  for their low power consumption due to the  to the underlying ‘bistable’ display technology. These displays can continue to show information without any power at all. It is only required while updating the display with new information, otherwise there won’t be any power consumption.

Providing such revolutionary displays to your applications will be a professional approach. For this, a new crowdfunding campaign is providing Paperino, an easy-to-use, micro ePaper shield for the Particle & Arduino community. Paperino simplifies driving ePaper displays with clean, simple, and short script examples.

Thanks to the plug-and-play shield for particle family, Paperino can be used with the following boards: Photon, Electron, or Bluz without manual wiring. It can also be wired easily to be connected with Arduino and other compatible boards.

Paperino Features

Glass-free Display

Paperino is lightweight and thinner than other ePaper products because it uses a glass-free ePaper display from Plastic Logic. It weighs 1.2 grams and is only 0.5 mm thick.

Supports Four Gray Levels

Unlike many other ePaper products out there, Paperino can support four gray levels instead of two (black and white).

Fast, Partial Updates

You don’t have to wait for slow, full screen updates to load. With Paperino, you can quickly update only parts of the screen.

Accelerometer

The integrated accelerometer lets you interact with your Paperino in all sorts of ways, including tap sensing. Tap sensing capability can trigger screen updates or wake up your microcontroller.

Paperino Specifications

The Paperino breakout board can be used for manually wiring your favourite, Arduino-compatible microcontroller with 3.3 V and >4kb of free RAM.

  • Resolution: 148 x 70 px
  • Pixel density: 150 ppi
  • Grey levels: 4
  • Weight: 1.2 g
  • Thickness: 500 µm
  • Power consumption: 4.5 mA (mean current for typical image update)
  • Operating conditions: 0°C .. 40°C
  • Storage conditions: -25°C .. 50°C

You can pre-order your own Paperino for $20 and with a driver board for $30. The crowdfunding campaign still has 16 days to go, and you can learn more details by checking it out.

How to use the 4.3′ E-Paper display with Arduino

educ8s.tv has uploaded another tutorial on how to use a e-paper display with Arduino. Source code is provided.

Electronic paper and e-paper are display technologies that mimic the appearance of ordinary ink on paper. Unlike conventional backlit flat panel displays that emit light, electronic paper displays reflect light like paper. This make them more comfortable to read, and provide a wider viewing angle than most light-emitting displays. Many electronic paper technologies hold static text and images indefinitely without electricity.

How to use the 4.3′ E-Paper display with Arduino – [Link]

How to Make an Internet Speed Analyzer

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This is an internet speed Analyzer based on Raspberry Pi:

This application will run speedtest-cli against speedtest.net’s servers using cron. It will then email the results daily and weekly.

Also – using http://www.percheron-electronics.uk/shop/ e-paper hat – you can utilize the buttons to run the speed-test manually and display the results to the screen.

To use the device you will need a few bits installed to your Raspberry Pi. You can see the full list below, but if you just want to get started, see the simple instruction below:

How to Make an Internet Speed Analyzer – [Link]