Tag Archives: ESD

Ultra-thin, high thermal conductivity substrate integrates ESD protection

Clemens Valens @ elektormagazine.com discuss about a new IC substrate. He writes:

A new, ultra-thin ceramic substrate with an ESD strength of up to 25 kV – more than three times higher than the standard 8 kV of state-of-the-art Zener diodes – also features a high thermal conductivity of 22 W/mK. This is three times better than that of conventional carriers, even though the substrate is significantly slimmer. The new technology is especially well-suited for LED applications where the number and density of LEDs per unit continues to grow.

Ultra-thin, high thermal conductivity substrate integrates ESD protection – [Link]

850nm infrared LED outputs 770mW at 1A

2016-07-06-eete-jh-osram

by Julien Happich@ edn-europe.com

Designed for infrared illumination for cameras, surveillance systems or machine vision, the Oslon Black SFH 4715A infrared emitting diode (IRED) boasts a low thermal resistance of maximum 11K/W, delivering a 850nm beam with an optical output of 770mW at 1A

Higher outputs can be achieved with stack versions, in which two emission centers are provided per chip. The device features a low component height of 2.3 mm.

The device is ESD safe up to 2 kV and will soon be qualified to AEC-Q101-REV-C for automotive use.

Protection Methods for Automotive Electronics Circuits

littelfuse-automotive-aumov-pic2

Jim Colby @ edn-europe.com discuss how to protect your circuits on automotive enviroment:

Along with the ever increasing drive for improved gas mileage, automobile manufacturers are striving to make their vehicles safer with each new design iteration. The safety features that are now available or standard on most vehicles, such as airbags, backup cameras, collision avoidance systems, and tire pressure sensors, have all drastically improved vehicle safety. The protections offered by these systems are obvious. But, there are also many unseen technologies that offer additional protection for the electronics systems in today’s vehicles.

As vehicles have become safer, so has the electronic circuitry that helps provide that safety. The advanced chipsets that are used in vehicles today are subjected to countless electrical hazards that are commonplace in the harsh automotive environment. Typical automotive electrical hazards or transients include lightning, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and switching loads in power electronics circuits.

Protection Methods for Automotive Electronics Circuits – [Link]