Tag Archives: fan

Fan Speed Control Is Cool!

App note from Maxim Integrated about their MAX6650 and MAX6651 fan controllers chip.

Temperature-based fan control is a necessity in a growing number of systems, both to reduce system noise and to improve fan reliability. When fan control is augmented by fan-speed monitoring, a speed-control loop can be implemented that is independent of manufacturing variances and wear on the fan. In addition, a fan that is about to fail can be identified so that it can be replaced before it fails.

Fan Speed Control Is Cool! – [Link]

Temperature Controlled Fan With LED Status

This is a simple fan controller with single LED temperature status light using an ATtiny85 microcontroller and DS18B20 temperature sensor. The fan is turned on/off based on temperature sensed and the controller goes in sleep mode when the temperature drop below a predefined threshold.

Simple ATtiny85 fan controller to turn a fan on/off based on temperature. Includes an LED as a temperature indicator. LED is dim at start of fan on temperature and blinks when above a max temperature. Fan is not PWM controlled since I am using a small 5V fan which is quiet running at 100%. The controller is in sleep state while the temperature is below the minimum threshold and wakes up every ~8 seconds to recheck the temperature. When temperature is above minimum threshold, the controller will stay awake checking every second till the temperature falls below the minimum threshold. The code uses ds18b20 library by Davide Gironi.

Temperature Controlled Fan With LED Status – [Link]

PWM Fan controller

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Lucky Resistor has build a PWM fan controller using Arduino and DHT22 sesnsors.

The fan controller described on this project page, controls one or more PWM controlled 12V PC fans. It uses the input from two precise DHT22 based temperature sensors. The MCU is an Arduino Uno, which is powered using a 12V power source. On top of the Arduino Uno, there is the Adafruit data logger shield — and on top of that is an Adafruit LCD shield. The software is a simple, custom written PID controller.

PWM Fan controller – [Link]

A dual sensor fan controller build

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Kerry Wong has designed and built a dual sensor fan controller:

To make the design more useful, one channel is marked as optional (see components with * on the silkscreen) so that you can build either a single sensor fan controller or a dual sensor one. With two sensors, the control signal is or’d with both of the sensor input and if either side of the temperature exceeds a predefined threshold the fan will be turned on. This is useful in situations where power devices from multiple channels share the same heat sink

A dual sensor fan controller build – [Link]

Temperature controlled Fan

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Ahmad Al-Shalabi and Bassma Karbouj show us how to control a DC fan using easy to find components. The fan works when temperature reach into pre-specified threshold.

The purpose of this project is creating a cooling system by controlling in a DC fan in a simple way without using Microcontrollers or Arduino but by using electronic components that it’s very simple and available. The DC fan controlling achieved by a Thermistor and which is a type of resistor whose resistance is dependent on temperature. there is two type of thermistor that is NTC ” Negative Temperature Coefficient” , PTC ” Positive Temperature Coefficient “

Temperature controlled Fan – [Link]

Heat Activated Cooling Fan Controller

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Heat activated cooling fan controller is a simple project which operates a brushless fan when the temperature in a particular area goes above a set point, when temperature return normal, fan automatically turns off. The project is built using LM358 Op-amp and LM35 temperature Sensor. Project requires 12V DC supply and can drive 12V Fan. This project is useful in application like Heat sink temperature controller, PC, heat sensitive equipment, Power supply, Audio Amplifiers, Battery chargers, Oven etc

Heat Activated Cooling Fan Controller – [Link]

Temperature controlled fan

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Lukas Fassler from Soldernerd has written up documentation on his DIY fan controller project:

I’m currently mainly working on my new anemometer design but once in a while I get distracted. For example when my Keysight E3645A lab power supply was making so much noise that I could hardly concentrate. That’s when the idea of this fan controller was born.

Temperature controlled fan – [Link]

Quantifying cooling system

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Chris Palmer has built this coolometer project to measure the cooling effectiveness of various fan:

I was wondering about how I was going to calibrate the airflow reading but then realised that the flow rate is not actually what I am interested in. It is the cooling effect the airflow has, which is what I am directly measuring. The result is simply the extra power needed to maintain a target temperature and is a measure how fast the bulb filament is being cooled. So rather than an anemometer I decided to call it a coolometer. Unfortunately Futurama used that name first. Rather than displaying megafonzies mine displays milliwatts!

Quantifying cooling system – [Link]

Simple and small temperature fan control

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Xristost published a new project, a simple and small temperature fan control:

I published this schematic long ago in this article: Adjustable power supply and since then I made some improvements in PCB to make the board as small as possible. The idea is to be easy to attach the whole board to the heat sink which we want to monitor. The board is only 27mm x 27m

Simple and small temperature fan control – [Link]

Have you ever seen a fan resistant to dust and water?

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New series of Sunon fans with IP68 protection brings reliability even to conditions, where a usual fan doesn´t withstand too long…

Still more noise and vibrations and in extreme case even a total malfunction – this is a typical “end” of the fan after a long-time operation in a dusty or corrosive environment. In a usual dry and relatively clean environment, this scenario is not that dramatic and high-quality fans hold on to work for many years without problems. However, it can be also said, that common industrial environment is quite far from an ideal = clean one.

So, which fan to use?

The first good advice might be to use a quality fan, for example from companies Sunon or EBM-Papst. Company Sunon this time declares, that they shifted a level of lifetime and durability a step higher… They “wrapped” all the motor into a „high-tech“ coating and incorporated a mechanism for automatic dust removal from a motor part.

And the result?

The fan works reliably even after a 60 minute ingress into water and into 1m depth. That´s only a small example demonstrating features of the new series with IP68 protection. New series carry GExxxx or GFxxxx marking and they´re available in three sizes – 80x80x25mm, 80x80x38mm and 90x90x25mm. All types are equipped by two ball bearings.
On stock we have types – GF80251B1-AE9 ( 80×25 12VDC 3,96W 101,9m3/h) and GE80252B1-AE9 ( 80×25 24VDC 4,8W 101,9m3/h). Upon request we´re able to supply you also other types.


Have you ever seen a fan resistant to dust and water? – [Link]