Tag Archives: FLASH

Toshiba launches 256-Gbit 48-layer 3-D NAND flash

Toshiba BiCS

by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

Ready for sampling in September, Toshiba’s 48-layer BiCS (Bit Cost Scalable) flash memory stores 256 Gbits using a 3-D vertically stacked cell structure and 3-bit-per-cell triple-level cell technology. By employing this 48-layer vertical stacking process, BiCS flash surpasses the capacity of conventional 2-D NAND flash memory, where cells are arrayed in a planar direction on a silicon plane.

BiCS also enhances write/erase reliability endurance and boosts write speeds. The 256-Gbit (32-Gbyte) device can be used in a myriad of applications, including consumer solid-state drives, smart phones, tablets, memory cards, and enterprise SSDs for data centers.

Toshiba launches 256-Gbit 48-layer 3-D NAND flash – [Link]

FlashProg – USB serial flash memory programmer

flashprog-prototype-small1-600x398

Dilshan Jayakody published a new project, the FlashProg – a USB serial flash memory programmer:

FlashProg is USB base flash memory programmer to work with 3.3V serial flash memory devices. This programmer is specifically design to read, program and configure 25x series, serial flash memory devices which are commonly used to store BIOS in PC mainboards.
Originally we design this project to read and program BIOS of Foxconn G31MXP mainboard. Our version of G31MXP contains Macronix MX25L8005 8M-Bit serial flash memory and we use this programmer to load some of our custom BIOS to this serial memory.

FlashProg – USB serial flash memory programmer – [Link]

Cypress expands energy-efficient line of nonvolatile RAMs

Cypress 4Mb FRAM

by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

Cypress Semiconductor is sampling a 4-Mbit ferroelectric RAM (F-RAM), which is one of the industry’s highest density serial F-RAMs, featuring a 40-MHz serial peripheral interface (SPI) and a 2.0-V to 3.6-V operating voltage range. F-RAMs consume 200 times less energy than serial EEPROMs and 3000 times less energy than NOR flash devices. Further, Cypress F-RAMs are able to endure 100 trillion read/write cycles and provide 10-year data retention at 85°C and 151 years at 65°C.

These energy-efficient memory devices are useful for applications requiring continuous and frequent high-speed reading and writing of data with absolute data security. The 4-Mbit F-RAM devices address mission-critical applications, such as industrial controls and automation, industrial metering, multifunction printers, test and measurement equipment, and medical wearables.

Cypress expands energy-efficient line of nonvolatile RAMs – [Link]

3D flash technology moves forward with 10 TB SSDs and the first 48-layer memory cells

high-capacity-3d-flash-memory

by Dario Borghino @ gizmag.com:

Flash storage technology will soon see a three-fold improvement in data density thanks to a joint development at Intel and Micron that will allow the production of 3.5 TB flash sticks and 10 TB standard-sized SSDs. Meanwhile, a new 48-layer cell technology development by Toshiba could pave the way for higher write speeds, more reliability and lower costs in solid state drives.

3D flash technology moves forward with 10 TB SSDs and the first 48-layer memory cells – [Link]

The STM32F446 from STMicroelectronics

Impressionby elektor.com:

Evaluation samples of STMicroelectronics’ STM32F446 range of MCUs are now available. These devices feature ARM Cortex-M4 based processing units with compact 256 or 512 KB on-chip Flash options and 128KB RAM with built-in memory-extension interfaces, extended connectivity and communication capabilities.

The MCUs use ST’s proprietary ART Accelerator, smart architecture, advanced Flash technology and an embedded ARM Cortex-M4 core to achieve a performance of 225 DMIPS and 608 CoreMark at 180 MHz executing from embedded Flash.

The interface capabilities allow simultaneous communication via multiple interfaces which cater for interactive industrial, scientific, medical, and Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications, while the advanced process technology, together with dynamic voltage scaling, extensive clock gating and flexible sleep modes offer significant power savings.

The STM32F446 from STMicroelectronics – [Link]

Tag-Connect: The ICP Connector That Saves PCB Space & Cost Less

tag-connect-header-vs-icp

by Danny Mavromatis:

There are a lot of little details you need to think about when taking a project from PoC (proof-of-concept) to production. Most projects today have some form of onboard microprocessor and require you to flash your custom bootloader and/or program code onto it at some point. There are many ways this can be accomplished but the most common method is using an ICP (in-circuit programmer) connected to a 6-pin ICP header somewhere on the PCB. […]

Tag-Connect! I can’t remember exactly how I found out about this neat little connector, but I’ve been using it for a while and it’s actually very useful in a production environment. They provide the footprint for many of the popular PCB design programs so placing it is very straight forward. Pretty much just swap out the traditional header for the new tiny Tag-Connect version and you’re pretty much done.

Tag-Connect: The ICP Connector That Saves PCB Space & Cost Less – [Link]

Toshiba starts mass production of world’s first 15nm NAND flash memories

toshibastart

by phys.org:

Toshiba Corporation today announced that it has developed the world’s first 15-nanometer (nm) process technology, which will apply to 2-bit-per-cell 128-gigabit (16 gigabytes) NAND flash memories. Mass production with the new technology will start at the end of April at Fab 5 Yokkaichi Operations, Toshiba’s NAND flash fabrication facility (fab), replacing second generation 19 nm process technology, Toshiba’s previous flagship process. The second stage of Fab 5 is currently under construction, and the new technology will also be deployed there.

Toshiba starts mass production of world’s first 15nm NAND flash memories – [Link]

Honey, I Shrunk the PC

intel-1

At the CES 2014 held in Las Vegas Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich’s introduced a PC built into an SD card-sized casing called the Edison. It uses Intel’s Quark chip which was launched last year and is seen as Intel’s answer to the rapidly emerging wearable and ‘Internet of Things’ market.

The Quark is a 22nm low-power dual-core x86 processor that Intel also use in their Galileo (Arduino compatible) development board which they introduced last year. In the Edison this processor chip is combined with some LPDDR2 and Flash memory. Connectivity is catered for by the built-in Bluetooth 4.0 Smart and Wi-Fi capability. The Edison’s SD card format is also used by the Anglo-American startup Electric Imp, which has been offering an SD card-sized, ARM based device for almost a year. The Imp is available as a slot-in SD card or solder-on form but lacks Bluetooth Smart for device-to-device connectivity. It uses its Wi-Fi capability to connect code running on the card to web or app-based user interfaces using the company’s Imp cloud servers. [via]

Honey, I Shrunk the PC – [Link]

New LED Photo Flash Drivers for Smartphone Cameras Improve Image Quality

article-2013december-new-led-photo-flash-drivers-fig1

By Gina Roos,

Widespread adoption of cameras in smartphones and other mobile devices, together with consumer expectations for higher quality, sharper images are driving the need for simpler designs, smaller sizes, and lower component counts, particularly as many smartphones move to integrate front- and back-facing cameras.

Mobile phone cameras will increase from approximately 1.6 billion units in 2011 to more than 2.2 billion units in 2015, representing 92 percent of mobile phones worldwide, according to Gartner Inc. The market research firm also found that an additional 15 percent of phones would have two cameras to take portrait photos or to enable video chat.

New LED Photo Flash Drivers for Smartphone Cameras Improve Image Quality – [Link]