Tag Archives: Gas

SprintIR6S, World’s Fastest NDIR CO2 Sensor

Gas Sensing Solutions (GSS) Ltd is a designer and manufacturer of low power, high speed Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide gas sensors. Recently, it has claimed a new speed record for its SprintIR6S NDIR CO2 sensor.

The new sensor comes with response rates that had never been reached before by any other NDIR CO2 sensors. It can take up to 20 readings per second, and has a six-times faster response rate than the current SprintIR.

According to Ralph Weir, GSS’ CEO, the sensor uses LEDs and photodiodes to measure differential light absorption between light at 4.2 and 4.4 μm. So, they succeeded to develop ultra-speed sensor, while other detectors take several seconds or even minutes to take a reading.

“Our LEDs, by contrast, are Solid State emitters, and illuminate almost instantly. With the new SprintIR6S, we’ve also minimised the sample volume down to only 2ml, which enables us to achieve our fastest ever response rates.”
~ Ralph Weir

The SprintIR6S is less than a cubic inch in dimension with 23.8mm in diameter and 24mm tall. It operates at a range between 3.25V and 5.5V and consumes only 35mW. SprintIR6S is also available in measurements ranges from 0% to 100%.

Main Specifications of SprintIR6S

  • Warm-up Time: < 30 seconds
  • Operating Conditions:
    • 0°C to 50°C (Standard)
    • 0 to 95% RH, non-condensing
  • Recommended Storage: -30°C to +70°C
  • Sensing Method:
    • Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) absorption
    • Patented Gold-plated optics
    • Solid-state source and detector
  • Sample Method: Flow through
  • Measurement Range: 0-5%, 0-20%, 0-100%
  • Accuracy: ±70 ppm +/- 5% of reading (100% Range ±300 ppm +/-5% of reading)
  • Non Linearity: < 1% of FS
  • Pressure Dependence: 0.13% of reading per mm Hg in normal atmospheric conditions
  • Operating Pressure Range: Atmospheric pressure range. Lower and higher pressures require more advanced pressure compensation.
  • Response Time: Flow Rate Dependent – see graph below. Response time also depends on user configurable digital filter settings.
  • Power Input:
    • 3.25 to 5.5V. (3.3V recommended).
    • Peak Current 33mA.
    • Average Current <12mA.

Applications of SprintIR6S are those which require capture of rapidly changing CO2 concentrations. Such as capnography, fitness testing, metabolic assessment, sports science, veterinary medicine, bio-medical, and incubators.

For more information and detailed specification, you can download the datasheet, or contact GSS to order or for more information.

Air Quality Sensors on tindie.com

Pesky Products @ tindie.com writes:

This is a small (17.9 mm x 10.3 mm) breakout board with Bosch’s BME280 pressure, temperature, and humidity sensor as well as AMS’ CCS811 digital gas sensor. The sensors work in concert to provide a complete measurement via I2C register reads of indoor air quality including temperature- and humidity-compensated estimates of equivalent CO2 concentration in parts per million (400 – 8192 ppm) and volatile organic chemical concentration in parts per billion (0 – 1187 ppb).

Air Quality Sensors on tindie.com – [Link]

ESP8266 mains energy monitor

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Brian Dorey has designed a mains energy monitor based on ESP8266 that have sensors for the mains current, electric meter and gas meter.

As the new solar logger did not have this functionality we decided to design a new data-logger that would measure not only the mains current usage but also keep track of the electric meter and gas meter so we can easily see how much energy we are using in the house.
The new mains energy monitor was designed to be a standalone box that would be powered from the mains and have sensors for the mains current, electric meter and gas meter. As we didn’t want to run any more wires around the house we also decided to make it wireless connecting to our network over Wi-Fi.

ESP8266 mains energy monitor – [Link]

LPG Sensor Alarm

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sameer @ sgprojects.co.in has build a LPG gas detection circuit based on LM358:

LPG gas detection project’s main idea is to implement the security system for detecting leakage of liquid petroleum gas in closed environment. In this project gas leakage is identified by using MQ6 gas sensor. A simple circuit with an Op-Amp IC is powered by a step down transformer and finally the alarm produces on detecting gas.

LPG Sensor Alarm – [Link]

CCS811 – Digital CMOS gas sensors for wearables & IoT

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by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Cambridge CMOS Sensors is a semiconductor company that designs gas sensor solutions to monitor the local environment; its CCS811 is the first digital product in its CCS800 product family of ultra-low power miniature gas sensors.

The CCS811 integrates a metal oxide gas sensor with a microcontroller sub-system which enables Indoor Air Quality Monitoring, ease of design, extended battery life and reduced system cost for smartphones, wearables and connected home devices. It is based on CCS’s Micro-hotplate technology which enables a highly reliable solution for gas sensors, very fast cycle times and a significant reduction in average power consumption compared with traditional metal oxide gas sensors.

CCS811 – Digital CMOS gas sensors for wearables & IoT – [Link]

DIY WiFi gas detector with text alerts

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Stefan over at Hackster.io has written an article detailing his DIY Wi-Fi gas detector that sends SMS alerts:

Hey guys, back with another little project that I’ve been fiddling with for the past week. With kids around, every parent is thinking how to make their home safer for the little ones and for everybody in general. One of the most dangerous thing in the house can be the stove and since we have a gas-powered one, I always wondered why there are no simple gas detectors that can be used around the stove, just to alert instantly that gas may be leaking.
Well, that was the moment when I decided to build one of my own. Having a Particle (Spark) Photon lying around, I decided to use that as a foundation for the project. I like the fact that they are very small and cheap, and also can be flashed over the Wi-Fi. Having that settled, I needed the gas sensor and some kind of alerting system.

DIY WiFi gas detector with text alerts – [Link]

Get rid of unpleasant odors easily and effectively

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USM-MEMS-VOC module evaluates rate of air pollution by contaminants such as cigarette smoke and cooking odors and allows control of air ventilation system on demand.

Modul USM-MEMS-VOC is based on the innovative and highly stable TGS 8100 MEMS semiconductor sensor TGS8100 from Figaro. In the presence of detectable gas, sensor resistance decreases depending on gas concentration in the air. New technology allows very rapid response to gas concentration change. The USM-MEMS-VOC reacts within 8 seconds.

The module evaluates ratio of sensor resistance in clean air (base level) to sensor resistance in polluted air and calculates air quality in range 0 to 100%. It communicates through UART interface. Besides that it provides PWM signal (185Hz) with pulse width proportional to air quality and three binary outputs which turns on when air quality reach 25%, 50% and 75%.

The module allows using of external I2C temperature/humidity sensor for measuring and also to temperature/humidity compensation of TGS8100. USM-MEMS-VOC and TGS8100 can be found in our standard stock offer.


Get rid of unpleasant odors easily and effectively – [Link]

Environmental Alert System

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by Aleator777:

What’s that smell? It’s noxious gas of course! If you’re in an environment where there’s a possibility of gaseous release of which you’d rather not breathe, why not build an automatic system for sensing and alerting you? The design for the Environmental Alert System is driven by my motivation to understand the concentrations of different chemicals in the air. The unit consists of an array of four gas sensors (one each for methane, propane, carbon monoxide, and smoke) connected to an Intel Edison for wireless detection and alerting. While no substitute for a proper commercial chemical detection system, the EAS makes for a great weekend project!

Environmental Alert System – [Link]