Tag Archives: Geiger

Geiger Backpack with Intel Edison

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Geiger Backpack is a device that measures ambient radioactivity and GPS position and saves them on a cloud database using your smartphone as a WiFi hotspot.

Our project is a portable device powered by an Intel Edison and equipped with a GPS receiver and a Geiger Tube, a sensor able to detect radioactivity.

Our device continuosly measures ambient radioactivity and GPS position and saves them on a cloud database using your smartphone as a WiFi hotspot.

You can turn on your device, put it inside you backpack (here’s the origin of the name), pick up you bike and ride all around you town. When you’re back at home you can view a heatmap of radioactivity level you encountered during your ride.

Geiger Backpack with Intel Edison – [Link]

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter

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by paulindallas @ instructables.com:

Last Black Friday, the big sale day that comes right after Thanksgiving, I came across a sale on the Electronic Goldmine web site for a Geiger counter kit and tube for about $30. Now I always wanted to play with a Geiger counter, even as a kid back in the 50’s when Uranium, nuclear power, mutant radioactive ants (the movie “THEM” 1954) etc. were all the rage. I figured I was not getting any younger, so I bought it.

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter – [Link]

Geiger counter with SBM20 tube

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by weirdlab.fr:

I “rebuild” my Geiger counter, the SBM-20 tube was initially inside the box, i have put this one inside a 32mm diam plastic tube, for more convenience, wired through a XLR3 cable. This counter is from “Electronique-Pratique” n°368, a french electronic magazine. Shem, pcb, and PIC hex & C source code available.

Geiger counter with SBM20 tube – [Link]

Geiger Counter

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A Geiger counter, also called a Geiger-Muller (GM) counter, is a type of particle detector that measures ionizing radiation. It detects the emission of nuclear radiation: alpha particles, beta particles, and gamma rays by the ionization produced in a low-pressure gas in a Geiger-Muller (GM) tube, which gives its name to the instrument.

A High Voltage generator (U1, U2, Q1, T1, and associated components) powers a GM tube. A pulse from the GM tube is interfaced through Q2 and U1 to pulse-generator U3, which drives a speaker.

Geiger Counter – [Link]

Pocket Photodiode Geiger Counter

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by JamecoElectronics @ instructables.com:

Build a DIY geiger counter that uses a PIN photodiode as a substitute for an expensive Geiger-Mueller tube. It detects alpha and beta radiation particles. The circuit is soldered onto a small protoboard and everything is placed in an aluminum enclosure. Copper tubing and a piece of aluminum foil is used to help filter out noise and RF interference.

Pocket Photodiode Geiger Counter – [Link]

Small, portable and cheap radiation detector is being designed for the public

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By Ben Coxworth @ gizmag.com:

Ever since the Fukushima nuclear reactor disaster, there has understandably been an upsurge in the sale of consumer radiation-detecting devices. Most of these gadgets are variations on the Geiger counter, in that they alert the user to the presence and level of radiation, but not the type of radiation – which is very important to know. Researchers at Oregon State University are hoping to address that situation, with the MiniSpec. Currently in development, the handheld device will additionally tell its users what type of radionuclide is creating the radiation, and whether it poses a risk.

Small, portable and cheap radiation detector is being designed for the public – [Link]

DIY Geiger counter

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by Henrik’s Blog @ hforsten.com:

Ionizing radiation is something that almost anyone finds exciting (or scary) and I’ve also been for long wanted to build a Geiger counter. Unfortunately Geiger tubes have usually been too expensive to seriously consider buying them just for a hobby project. But I found out that sovtube sold soviet cold war era Geiger tubes only for a couple dollars. I bought one CI-22BG tube and one CI-3BG tube for total of 16€ including shipping from Ukraine to Finland. The site itself didn’t really convince me payment via Paypal failed because of invalid seller email address and gmail warned me that order confirmation e-mail might not have come from the address it claimed. However, I got both of the tubes and they seemed to be okay.

DIY Geiger counter – [Link]

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station

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sites.google.com/site/diygeigercounter writes:

This project measures the background radiation outside the house, and transmits it to a display station inside the house. The outside sensing unit is solar powered (but it doesn’t have to be), and should have a range of at least 50m. The display station inside the house continuously displays the current background, and logs it to an SD card (along with date / time, temperature and other data). Daily high counts and other information are also displayed.

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station – [Link]

ArduSat – Your Arduino Experiment in Space

Reka Kovacs writes:

We are building an ArduSat (according to the Cubesat standards a satellite 10 cm long at the edges and 1 kg or less), on this satellite we would put up to 5 Arduino’s and plug in 50+ sensors into them as well as 2 optical and 1 IR camera. Once the satellite is on orbit we would then give access to the general public/citizen scientists to the payload ( Arduinos, sensors and camera) to upload their own scientific experiments. We plan to capture the attention of the DIY community, hackers and makers, amateur astronomers and in general those interested in space exploration and the next frontier.

Sensor wise we have so far magnetometers, tachometers, plasma sensor, photometer, thermometer, pressure sensor, space radiation (bitflip) sensor, Geiger counter and 2 optical and 1 IR camera etc.The idea is that people can rent scientific packages for a week, during the week they run their experiment we will send data constantly back to them to analyze. Imagine general public, including teachers having access to experiment platform in space for a couple of hundreds of dollar and they analyze data and engage students, friends etc., it could revolutionize the way people see space. Also we are looking for feedback from people interested in the project. We want to hear their ideas or sensors and experiments!

ArduSat – Your Arduino Experiment in Space – [Link]