Tag Archives: H-bridge

DRV8871 – 3.6A Brushed DC Motor Driver


The DRV8871 is a brushed-DC motor driver for printers, appliances, industrial equipment, and other small machines. Two logic inputs control the H-bridge driver, which consists of four N-channel MOSFETs that can control motors bidirectionally with up to 3.6-A peak current. The inputs can be pulse-width modulated (PWM) to control motor speed, using a choice of current-decay modes. Setting both inputs low enters a low-power sleep mode.

DRV8871 – 3.6A Brushed DC Motor Driver – [Link]

Open Inverter, an open source micro-solar inverter


Ken Boak has been working on an open source micro-solar inverter project:

We wanted to make a design that uses readily obtainable N-type FETS and an Arduino (more strictly a ATmega328P-PU on a breadboard) to generate the PWM signals and provide simple circuit protection, and load sensing. With the PWM signals generated in firmware it can easily be modified for 50Hz or 60Hz operation, either 115V or 230V operation and a wide range of battery input voltages.
We imagined that the final design could consist of an Arduino, an “Inverter Shield” containing FETs and driver ICs configued in a H-bridge and some voltage and current monitoring circuits. To make the inverter a 12V or 24V battery (or PV panel) and a 12V (or 24V) torroidal transformer would be added.

Open Inverter, an open source micro-solar inverter – [Link]

Matchbox car


Shane has been working on making small robots and made a prototype of a matchbox car, a robot car that fits inside a matchbox:

This build consists of a tiny DC motors ripped from a pair of 9g servos, a h-bridge motor controller, an el-cheapo 8 bit pic and a 100mAh 3.7V LiPo battery.

Matchbox car – [Link]

Power playground project


Spacewrench over at Dorkbotpdx published a new build, a Power Playground project:

It’s a PMOS/NMOS H-Bridge with FETs that can handle 3 amps or so, plus a SPI current sensor, some switches & a rotary encoder (not stuffed yet), and a 7-segment display, all controlled by a Teensy-3.1 running FreeRTOS.

I made this because I’m always running into battery, power, inductor and transformer issues I don’t have any experience with. The idea is to use the H-bridge configuration and current sensors to experiment with moderate-current PWM, motor control, power-line synchronization, battery charging and discharging, etc.


Power playground project – [Link]

Rohm H-Bridge Evaluation Board

This evaluation board has been developed for ROHM’s H-Bridge driver customers evaluating the BD62x2FP series. The BD62x2FP series can operate across a wide range of power supply voltages (from 3V to 32V max), supporting output currents of up to 2A. PWM signal control (20 kHz-100 kHz) or VREF control modes are used to vary motor rotation speeds.  ROHM’s ICs are complete with over current protection (OCP), over voltage protection (OVP), thermal shutdown (TSD) and under voltage lock-out (UVLO) protection circuits while also facilitating a low-power consumption design (10μA max).

Rohm H-Bridge Evaluation Board – [Link]

Monitor your H-Bridge Circuit Load

If you have an H-Bridge drive circuit for a motor, you may need a way to monitor the load on the circuit. This circuit is nice because it provides a single output that could be monitored with a microcontroller or other device. The trick is to use current sense amplifiers and measure the current on each leg of the circuit. The LTC6103 is a good choice because it has two sense amplifiers in the same package.

Here is a circuit diagram that will allow you to monitor the load.

Monitor your H-Bridge Circuit Load – [Link]

3.3V to 15V Input, ±15V (±12V) Output, Isolated Power Supply

[MAXIM APP 5509] This document details the Oceanside (MAXREFDES9#) subsystem reference design, a 3.3V to 15V input, ±15V (±12V) output, isolated power supply. The Oceanside design includes a high-efficiency step-up controller, a 36V H-bridge transformer driver for isolated supplies, a wide input range, and adjustable output low-dropout linear regulator (LDO). Test results and hardware files are included.

Isolated power is required in many applications such as industrial and medical applications. The Oceanside design uses a step-up controller (MAX668), a 36V H-bridge transformer driver (MAX13256), and a pair of LDOs (MAX1659 x2) to create a ±15V (±12V) output isolated power supply from a wide range of input voltages. This general purpose power solution can be used in many different types of isolated power applications, but is mainly targeted for industrial sensors, industrial automation, process control, and medical applications.

3.3V to 15V Input, ±15V (±12V) Output, Isolated Power Supply – [Link]

10-A H-Bridge motor controller

Chris from PyroElectro has posted his plans for a 10-A H-Bridge motor controller that avoids using the the typical controller ICs. He writes:

Motor control is the core heart of robotics. Without locomotion or any movement a robot is dull and lifeless. The H-bridge is a tried and true concept for DC motor control. It allows you to move motors forward, backward and with varying speeds through PWM (pulse with modulation).

This tutorial will take a few steps back from the all-in-one L298 or LMD18245 motor control ICs and look more into how we can build our own H-bridge without the need of an IC.

10-A H-Bridge motor controller – [Link]