Tag Archives: Hysteresis

Introduction to OPAMPs and Applications

Operational amplifiers (OPAMPs) are high performance differential amplifiers in integrated form that can be used in many different ways. A typical OPAMP has a non-inverting input, an inverting input, two dc power pins, one output pin and a few other fine-tuning pins. On the following image you can see a typical diagram of an operational amplifier.

The basic OPAMP operation is simple. If the voltage applied to the inverting input is greater than the voltage applied to the non-inverting input then the output saturates to the negative supply voltage. In addition, if the voltage applied to the non-inverting input is greater than the voltage applied to the inverting input, then the output saturates at positive supply voltage.

This operation mode is limited and doesn’t give us the full idea behind OPAMP operation. The trick to make an OPAMP more useful is to provide negative feedback from the output to the inverting input. In the image below we see an OPAMP with negative feedback working as an inverting amplifier.

In this configuration a part of the output voltage is fed back to the inverting input and thus the gain of the OPAMP can be controlled and output isn’t saturating. The gain of such an amplifier is controlled by the two resistors Rf and Rin. The minus means that the output is inverted relative to input.

By adding more components on the feedback loop, different OPAMP circuits can be made, such voltage regulator circuits, current to voltage converters, oscillators, filters etc.

Beside the negative feedback, a positive feedback can be used. This way the OPAMP is driven toward saturation and works in either +Vs or –Vs output range. Applications of positive feedback is on comparator circuits and oscillators. Continue reading Introduction to OPAMPs and Applications

Visualizing comparator and Op Amp hysteresis

setup-600x450

Kerry Wong writes:

Hysteresis can be added to a comparator circuit to improve its stability, especially when the input signal is noisy. In this post, we will examine the hysteresis characteristics of some common comparator and Op Amps using an oscilloscope.
Perhaps the most intuitive way to visualize the hysteresis in a circuit is to plot the input signal (x axis) against the output signal (y axis). So, if we sweep the input voltage we should be able to see the characteristics of the transitioning of the output voltage due to hysteresis.

Visualizing comparator and Op Amp hysteresis – [Link]

MCP9501 – Temperature Switch with Selectable Hysteresis

MCP9501/2/3/4 family of devices are temperature switches with ±1°C (typical) accurate factory set output thresholds. These devices are ideal for high power supply systems where an overtemperature protection circuit is needed. These devices do not require external components, consume 25 μA (typical), and the factory set thresholds provide simplicity.

MCP9501 – Temperature Switch with Selectable Hysteresis – [Link]