Tag Archives: ic

Wafer pooling: low-cost prototyping service for ICs

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AMS is providing a fast and cost effective IC prototyping service. by Clemens Valens @ elektormagazine.com:

The Full Service Foundry division of ams AG announced its fast and cost-efficient IC prototyping service, known as Multi-Project Wafer (MPW) or shuttle run. The prototyping service combines several designs from different customers onto a single wafer to offer significant cost advantages as the costs for wafers and masks are shared among a number of different participants.

Wafer pooling: low-cost prototyping service for ICs – [Link]

Understanding silicon circuits: inside the ubiquitous 741 op amp


Ken Shirriff’s blog looks inside the famous 741 OPMAP and discuss how it’s made and how it’s working:

The 741 op amp is one of the most famous and popular ICs[1] with hundreds of millions sold since its invention in 1968 by famous IC designer Dave Fullagar. In this article, I look at the silicon die for the 741, discuss how it works, and explain how circuits are built from silicon.

Understanding silicon circuits: inside the ubiquitous 741 op amp – [Link]

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates


by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Power Integrations offers a charger interface IC compatible with Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 specification; PI says its CHY103D IC optimises efficiency to prevent handset overheating during high-speed charging.

Added to the ChiPhy charger-interface IC family, PI saya this is the first IC for off-line AC-DC chargers compatible with the Quick Charge (QC) 3.0 protocol from Qualcomm Technologies. Used alongside Power Integrations’ InnoSwitch AC-DC switcher ICs, the CHY103D device incorporates all of the functions needed to support QC 3.0. The QC 3.0 protocol implemented in the CHY103D device substantially reduces losses in the smart mobile device handset during rapid charging. This permits system designers to choose to charge handsets faster or reduce phone touch-temperature during charging, and enhances the efficiency of the charging process.

Charger interface IC avoids handset overheating at fast-charge rates – [Link]

Infineon’s Security Chip


by Martin Cooke @ elektormagazine.com:

Protection of Intellectual Property is a major issue as industrial systems become increasingly more interconnected. According to Bartol Filipovic, head of the Product Protection and Industrial Security department at the Fraunhofer Institute for Research “Most companies have no idea just how easy it is to copy their products, encrypted software is not enough to protect standard products or machine code. The software must be ideally stored inside protected hardware.”

Infineon has developed a broad range of semiconductor technologies to counter these growing security threats. The OPTIGA Trust E SLS32AIA hardware security device provides a cost effective solution for high value goods. It forms part of the OPTIGA™ Trust family high-security solution for industrial automation systems, smart homes, consumer and medical devices. The OPTIGA™ Trust E provides enhanced protection of services, business models and user experience. Based on its 1-way authentication mechanism, it uniquely identifies objects and provides protection of Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) networks.

Infineon’s Security Chip – [Link]

Site enables detailed component comparisons


by Sagar Savant @ edn.com:

Choosing components is a series of time-consuming tasks, from surveying the market for possible candidates to properly evaluating performance. As a hardware engineer who has worked in Silicon Valley for 10 years, I have spent significant time developing test plans and specs, building fixtures, and testing components. One of the reasons comparing components takes a long time is because you can’t always rely on datasheets to give you the information you need. The problem with datasheets is that they only tell you the story the vendor of the component wants. If an IC characteristic is better under specific conditions, you can be sure the vendor will showcase their components under those conditions.

Site enables detailed component comparisons – [Link]

Homemade breadboard


by robertgawron.blogspot.com:

A breadboard can be also made at home, from one side, it will be more expensive than those on the markets, but for another side, it’s possible to add commonly used elements, like LEDs, switches, or other things, for example I added a precision IC socket that makes putting in and out of ICs much easier. Choosing what to put there is a bit like a making homemade pizza, one can put anything he likes (and what he has currently in the fridge).

Homemade breadboard – [Link]


Ultralow-power circuit improves efficiency of energy harvesting to more than 80 percent


by Larry Hardesty @ phys.org

The latest buzz in the information technology industry regards “the Internet of things”—the idea that vehicles, appliances, civil-engineering structures, manufacturing equipment, and even livestock would have their own embedded sensors that report information directly to networked servers, aiding with maintenance and the coordination of tasks.

Realizing that vision, however, will require extremely low-power sensors that can run for months without battery changes—or, even better, that can extract energy from the environment to recharge.

Last week, at the Symposia on VLSI Technology and Circuits, MIT researchers presented a new power converter chip that can harvest more than 80 percent of the energy trickling into it, even at the extremely low power levels characteristic of tiny solar cells. Previous experimental ultralow-power converters had efficiencies of only 40 or 50 percent.

Ultralow-power circuit improves efficiency of energy harvesting to more than 80 percent – [Link]


High-speed comparator cuts delays to 2.9 ns


by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

Intended to drive logic levels of 3.3 V down to 1.8 V, the LTC6752 comparator from Linear Technology achieves fast rise and fall times of 1.2 ns and a toggle frequency of 280 MHz, making it one of the fastest CMOS-output comparators on the market. The device exhibits a propagation delay of only 2.9 ns and overdrive dispersion of just 1.8 ns. Jitter is 4.5 ps for a 100-mV pk-pk, 100-MHz sinusoidal input, and the outputs swing to within 200-mV of the rails with up to 8 mA of load current.

The LTC6752 offers five options in different packages with unique combinations of features, such as separate input and output supplies, low-power shutdown, output latch, adjustable hysteresis, and complementary outputs. Inputs extend beyond both rails, which is useful for single-supply operation. All five variants of the LTC6752 are capable of driving 3.3-V and 2.5-V logic. Three versions have separate input and output supplies, decoupling the input and output voltage levels and enabling them to drive 1.8-V logic.

High-speed comparator cuts delays to 2.9 ns – [Link]

CMOS Image Sensors Surpassing Moore’s Law


R. Colin Johnson @ eetimes.com:

PORTLAND, Ore. — Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imaging chips are becoming the industry’s leader in advanced process technology — instead of the traditional leaders (processors and memory) — thanks to strong demand for CMOS imaging chips in everything from smartphones to tablets to medical equipment and automobiles. Apparently, now the innovation surpasses Moore’s Law, says analyst firm Yole Développement.

Imaging was once done by film, but with the advent of solid-state sensors the technology breakthroughs seem to be growing exponentially, doubling with each new innovation (see slide 1), thus surpassing the traditional interpretation of Moore’s Law, argues Yole Développement (Lyon, France) in a new paper. Yole calls this effect “More than Moore.”

CMOS Image Sensors Surpassing Moore’s Law – [Link]

World’s 1st Spectrometer On-a-Chip


by R. Colin Johnson @ eetimes.com:

The world’s first microelectromechanical system (MEMS) spectrometer on-a-chip was shown today at at Photonics West (San Francisco, February 10-12) by Si-Ware Systems (SWS, Cairo, Egypt with offices in La Canada, Calif.) Instead of transporting materials across sometimes great distances to be analyzed with a normal bench-top spectrometer, Si-Ware’s MEMS-powered spectrometer fits in the palm of your hand and thus can be taken to the material to be analyzed.

“Spectrometers are usually bench sized, so your have to take the object to the bench, but now with our MEMS sized you can can take the spectrometer to the object,” said executive vice president, worldwide marketing and business development of Si-Ware, Scott Smyser.

World’s 1st Spectrometer On-a-Chip – [Link]