Tag Archives: ic

The future of IC design

D-Wave_Quantum_Computer

R Colin Johnson @ edn.com discuss about the future of IC design and the different technologies that can extend Moore Law. Such technologies include 3D memories, superconducting, quantum, neuromorphic and photonic mixed-signal devices.

To celebrate 60 years of EDN, we’re looking into the future to predict what advancements will be made in IC Design in the next 60 years. By 2076 3-D room-temperature, superconducting, quantum, neuromorphic, and photonic mixed-signal devices will be the common denominator for all integrated circuit designs. Design tools will be so sophisticated that even novice designers will be able to mix and match these technologies into system-in-package designs that solve all application problems behind the scenes. Users will be so used to extensions to their innate brain capabilities that the technologies which perform the tasks will be taken for granted, leaving the engineering community—and its robotic assistants—on a unique echelon of society that actually understands how the world works.

The future of IC design – [Link]

Memory upgrade for ESP8266

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Pete show us how to upgrade your ESP8266 with 32Mbit memory chip.

Some time ago I passed comment in here about converting an ESP-01 to 32Mb  (or 4MB).  And here it is in the flesh – a 32Mb ESP-01 – and also – at last – Sonoff Upgrades.

Now, why would you want to do all of that? I would suggest only if you happen to have lots of ESP-01 units lying around – and I’ll bet quiet a lot of you do. As for the Sonoffs – well, put it this way, I just ordered another 10 chips!

Memory upgrade for ESP8266 – [Link]

Inside the tiny RFID chip that runs San Francisco’s race

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Ken Shirriff teardowns an RFID chip used to track the time each runner took to run the race.

At the beginning and end of the race, the runners cross special mats that contain antennas and broadcast ultra high frequency radio signals. The runner’s RFID chip detects this signal and sends back the athlete’s ID number, which is programmed into the chip. By tracking these ID numbers, the system determines the time each runner took to run the race. The cool thing about these RFID chips is they are powered by the received radio signal; they don’t need a battery.

Inside the tiny RFID chip that runs San Francisco’s race – [Link]

World’s First 1,000-Processor Chip

kilocore_chipby Andy Fell:

A microchip containing 1,000 independent programmable processors has been designed by a team at the University of California, Davis, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The energy-efficient “KiloCore” chip has a maximum computation rate of 1.78 trillion instructions per second and contains 621 million transistors. The KiloCore was presented at the 2016 Symposium on VLSI Technology and Circuits in Honolulu on June 16.

World’s First 1,000-Processor Chip – [Link]

Micro-supercapacitor fits inside IoT chips

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by Jan Buiting @ elektormagazine.com:

Zero-power autonomous devices will abound on the IoT of the future, and battery manufacturers are scratching their heads to come up with the best possible solution ensuring high energy and power density at miniature scale. A new material developed recently at Finland-based VTT shows promise, based on energy and power density of a supercapacitor depending on the surface area and conductivity of the solid electrodes. The size? So small it fits inside an IC.

Micro-supercapacitor fits inside IoT chips – [Link]

Energy monitoring using ATM90E26

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Tisham Dhar designed an ATM90E26 energy meter breakout board which can be used in single phase power measurements.

After designing and testing the ADE7763 based Energy Monitor Breakout Board, I started looking around for cheaper and more modern alternatives.I came across the Atmel ATM90E26 Smart Metering IC with dual communication options – UART/SPI and multiple metering modes (tamper proofing with current sensing on live and neutral).

Energy monitoring using ATM90E26 – [Link]

Reverse engineering the popular 555 timer chip (CMOS version)

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Ken Shirriff reverse engineer the CMOS version of 555 timer IC and explains how it works.

This article explains how the LMC555 timer chip works, from the tiny transistors and resistors on the silicon chip, to the functional units such as comparators and current mirrors that make it work. The popular 555 timer integrated circuit is said to be the world’s best-selling integrated circuit with billions sold since it was designed in 1970 by analog IC wizard Hans Camenzind[1].

Reverse engineering the popular 555 timer chip (CMOS version) – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Hot rods keep the die cool

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Clemens Valens @ elektormagazine.com shows us a new IC Package that keeps the IC cool.

Texas Instruments’ HotRod QFN is a thermally enhanced plastic package with solder lands on all sides as well as power buses for enhanced current carrying capability. Inside the package the die is mounted on a copper lead frame which eliminates the power wire bonds, improving electrical and thermal performance. This technique also improves application efficiency and minimizes package parasitic radiation.

Hot rods keep the die cool – [Link]

Reverse engineering the popular 555 timer chip

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Ken Shirriff wrote an article on reverse engineering the 555 timer chip, He writes:

This article explains how the LMC555 timer chip works, from the tiny transistors and resistors on the silicon chip, to the functional units such as comparators and current mirrors that make it work. The popular 555 timer integrated circuit is said to be the world’s best-selling integrated circuit with billions sold since it was designed in 1970 by analog IC wizard Hans Camenzind[1]. The LMC555 is a low-power CMOS version of the 555; instead of the bipolar transistors in the classic 555 (which I described earlier), the CMOS chip is built from low-power MOS transistors. The LMC555 chip can be understood by carefully examining the die photo.

Reverse engineering the popular 555 timer chip – [Link]

A biometric sensor for wearables – LG Innotek

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LG Innotek has released an ultra-thin optical biometric sensor module designed to be used in wearables and smartphones to measure health parameters such as heartbeat, stress indicators and blood oxygen saturation level. The new sensor is more accurate than it’s predecessors achieving ±5 bpm range of error and consumes very little power to operate. At stable heartbeat rate an accuracy of ±2 bpm can be achieved, which is as good as conventional medical instruments. The module is just 1 mm thick and contains a photodiode, five LEDs and an IC.

A biometric sensor for wearables – LG Innotek – [Link]