Tag Archives: Interface

App note: Low cost I2C level translator

an_siliconlabs_an869

2 Diodes, 3 resistors and a transistor here’s Silicon Labs’ low cost solution on voltage level translation. [via]

This applications note discusses a low-cost circuit for I2C level translation. This circuit was developed for the Si701x, Si702x, and Si703x humidity sensors but will work in many applications. This circuit provides I2C level translation from a higher voltage supply, such as 5 V, to a lower voltage, supply such as 1.8 or 3.3 V. In addition, the optional emitter follower circuit provides a low-voltage power supply rail from the higher 5 V supply. Note that some devices allow for higher voltage tolerance on I2C inputs. For example, the Si7034 has a 3.3 V tolerant I2C interface, so the level translation is only required for 5 V I2C designs.

App note: Low cost I2C level translator – [Link]

IrDA Interface for Portable Devices

IRDA

The circuit uses a SC16C650 to implement an IrDA interface. Infrared Data Association (IrDA) has defined a group of short-range, high speed, bidirectional wireless infrared protocols, generically referred to as IrDA.

The hardware section is composed of SC16C650 which is electrically hooked-up to an IrDA transceiver module. The electrical connection between the SC16C650 and an IrDA transceiver module is very straightforward, no external component is required except an inverter to invert the IrDA output signal. Besides the power supply noise-filtering components, the only other component required is a 14 Ω resistor. This resistor sets the current through the IR emitter, hence the power output of the transceiver.

IrDA Interface for Portable Devices – [Link]

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How to effectively handle human-machine interface in your applications? – [Link]

MinieC I2C eC interface

MinipH_inaction_med

by sparkyswidgets.com:

MinieC eC interface is a very cost effective solution for adding eC sensing capability to any project. This unit takes the analog complexity out of measuring the conductivity of a solution.

MinieC I2C eC interface – [Link]

Common IC interface problems

This app note describes the common IC interface protocols like I2C, SPI, and GPIO. Also some problems covered with these interfaces that turn happy faces to sad. [via]

How can an interface change a happy face to a sad face? Engineers have happy faces when an interface works properly. Sad faces indicate failure somewhere. Because interfaces between microprocessors and ICs are simple—even easy—they are often ignored until interface failure causes sad faces all around. In this article, we discuss a common SPI error that can be almost impossible to find in a large system. Links to interface tutorial information are provided for complete information. Noise as a system issue and ICs to minimize its effects are also described.

Common IC interface problems – [Link]

TI Technical Articles

focus.ti.com writes:

Here you can find links to technical articles written by TI engineering experts for engineering trade magazines. Topics include how to select or design with amplifiers, data converters, clocks, interface and power management. They also address applications, such as audio, industrial, medical, high reliability and many others. Several sorting options can help you with your search

TI Technical Articles – [Link]

Simple Touch Screen Interface

pyroelectro.com writes:

Touch screen or touch activated technology has been around for a few decades now, but only recently have prices dropped and the technology been (somewhat) perfected. As an input device touch screens offer a more natural interaction that humans are used to, which offers a great advantage for businesses selling to the general public over traditional keyboards and mouses.

This article will look at how to interface to a 4-wire resistive touch screen and find out the X and Y coordinates of the current point being touched. A minimal number of parts will be used to simplify the system hardware, and to focus more on the theory of how it works.

Simple Touch Screen Interface – [Link]

PS/2 Keyboard Interface

pyroelectro.com writes:

The keyboard is the most common way for humans to input information into a computer. It has been around since before computers were main-stream and everyone was still using typewriters. Because of this prevalence in society, it’s important that we understand how to interface to the basic PS/2 keyboard.

This article will describe and show you an example of how to create a system capable of interacting with a keyboard in order to understand what keys have been pressed. The example system will be built on a breadboard using a PIC microcontroller to communicate with the keyboard and display output.

PS/2 Keyboard Interface – [Link]

Matrix keypad interfacing

embedded-lab.com writes:

Matrix keypads are very common input devices in embedded systems. They have simple architecture and are easy to interface. One good thing about them is that they allow you to interface a large number of input keys to a microcontroller with minimum usage of I/O resources. This tutorial describes two different approaches of reading input data from a 4×4 (16 keys) matrix keypad interfaced to a PIC microcontroller. The pressed key information is displayed on a character LCD. The microcontroller used in this experiment is PIC16F1827.

Matrix keypad interfacing – [Link]