Tag Archives: Internet

Quantum Internet Is Coming!

Secure and unhackable Internet is a goal of many researchers around the world. This is possible using an invisible quantum physical connections as networking links known as “quantum entanglement“. The main challenge is building  large networks that share entangled links with many particles and network nodes, because adding a node will weak the entanglement.

Researchers from Delft and Oxford have successfully found a way to form a strong entangled link. Their solution relays on merging multiple weaker quantum links into one to build a trustworthy quantum network between several quantum nodes.

The research group in known for its effort on implementing quantum entanglement to realize networking links. Now, they are working to pave the way for constructing the first quantum internet. They used photons to reach up to one kilometer macroscopic distance of quantum information link. They also show that this type of link is safe because the entanglement is invisible to intermediate parties, and the information is safe against eavesdropping.

We could now entangle electrons in additional quantum nodes such that we can extend the number of networking links towards a first real quantum network. Scientifically, a whole new world opens up. In five years we will connect four Dutch cities in a rudimentary quantum network.
– Ronald Hanson, The research group leader

This video demonstrates the new method and how it works:

The research paper was published in Science magazine, you can read it for more information.

Sources: TUDelft, elektor.

Share Your Internet Connection With Raspberry Pi Zero Over USB

Raspberry Pi Zero is the smallest member in Raspberry Pi single-board computers family with a single-core 1 GHz processor chip, a micro-SD card slot, a mini HDMI port and two micro USB ports (one for power, one for USB). A tutorial in CircuitBasics demonstrates how we can get an Internet access for Raspberry Pi Zero from our computer over USB, because Raspberry Pi Zero doesn’t have an Ethernet connector RJ45 to have direct access to network.

Raspberry Pi Zero - Image courtesy of Adafruit
Raspberry Pi Zero – Image courtesy of Adafruit

The trick used here is to recognize the Raspberry Pi Zero as a USB/Ethernet gadget, in other words using Ethernet emulation over USB.

What you need:

  • Micro USB to USB adapter.
  • Bonjour software installed on your computer to recognize USB and ethernet devices.
  • SSH client PuTTY on your computer.
  • A micro SD card with an image of Raspbian Jessie Full or Lite (version 5-10-16 or later).

Raspberry-Pi-Zero-Ethernet-Gadget-Pi-Zero-Plugged-Into-Micro-USB-Port

In order to do the trick of getting the Internet access over USB you need to setup up Pi Zero OTG before connecting Pi Zero with USB.
When you connect it with USB, after setting up the OTG, you will see the PI Zero under “Other devices”->“RNDIS/Ethernet Gadget” from device manager.

The last step is to set up shared Internet access with your USB/Ethernet gadget, here it’s Pi Zero, from “Network Connections”.

Communication with Pi Zero is done by using PuTTY.

ping www.google.com
ping www.google.com On Pi Zero

You can see the full steps from the tutorial in CircuitBasics.

ESP8266-based Clock Synchronized With Network Time Service

Thanks to Internet, the problem of time shifting in embedded and connected devices was solved using time synchronization over Internet.

National Institute of Standards and Technology provides a service called Network Time Service (NTS) over the Internet. The project of ESP8266-based clock, published on embedded-lab, is going to demonstrate how to make a benefit from NTS to accomplish time synchronization over the Internet.

This clock retrieves time information from NTS and display it on a 4-digit seven segment LED display, and the connection to NIST time server through your local WiFi network will be by using ESP-01 WiFi module.

ESPclockBOM-580x337

The 4-digit seven segment LED display breakout includes MAX7219 IC which is a seven segment driver. Three GPIO pins from ESP8266 module are used, where MAX7219 needs one for serial input,one for clock line and one to drive LOAD pin of MAX7219.

MAX7219_app

espCLOCK_Circuit

The firmware was developed using Arduino core for ESP8266. The firmware queries the time from NTS with 2-minutes interval that because NIST does not allow queries to any of their servers more frequently than once every 4 seconds, according to the blog post. During the 2-minutes, time display is kept running locally using the delay() routine.

To see the full instructions and to download the code you can visit the embedded-lab blog.

ESPclock

Raspberry Pi Zero Information Display

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Frederick @ frederickvandenbosch.be has build an Internet connected OLED display using Raspberry Pi Zero module.

After last week’s Pi Zero mod, I thought I’d try a slightly more useful project. Using an Adafruit OLED display, two push buttons, a wifi dongle and a Pi Zero, I made an internet connected information display. The information could be anything: time and date, weather, social media status, etc … The two push buttons are used to cycle through the data and trigger certain actions.

Raspberry Pi Zero Information Display – [Link]

How to Make an Internet Speed Analyzer

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This is an internet speed Analyzer based on Raspberry Pi:

This application will run speedtest-cli against speedtest.net’s servers using cron. It will then email the results daily and weekly.

Also – using http://www.percheron-electronics.uk/shop/ e-paper hat – you can utilize the buttons to run the speed-test manually and display the results to the screen.

To use the device you will need a few bits installed to your Raspberry Pi. You can see the full list below, but if you just want to get started, see the simple instruction below:

How to Make an Internet Speed Analyzer – [Link]

Raspberry PI answers, “Is the internet up?”

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whiskeytangohotel.com has build a internet monitoring device based on Raspberry Pi:

It is a pretty commonly uttered question (sometimes loudly) around the home or office; “Is the internet up?” As the goto IT Support Manager around the house this can get a little tiresome. Most of the time the internet is up and it’s a user or personal device problem that can be solved with a re-boot, re-load, re-etc. Sometimes the internet is really down requiring a router and cable modem reboot or a call to the ISP. Wouldn’t a simple visual check that anyone could quickly understand be helpful? Plus, as a bonus, provide some general network health statistics with a screen print and an hourly update to a Google Drive spreadsheet.

Raspberry PI answers, “Is the internet up?” – [Link]

Dekatron as Internet speed indicator

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spritesmods.com has build a interner speed indicator based on a Dekatron tube, the result is great.

As most electronic engineers and hobbyists do, I have a great respect for the earlier ways of controlling electrons, before it was found out that silicon could be used to miniaturize everything a thousandfold. It is amazing that things like a vacuum, a glow wire and a bunch of strange-looking metal bits can actually do useful stuff. The amazing-ness of it all gets even better if there are visuals involved: while vacuum tubes only have the faint glow of the heater, tubes filled with neon are more interesting because they can be used to display stuff. Nixie tubes are a prime example of those.

Dekatron as Internet speed indicator – [Link]