Tag Archives: iOS

Aeroscope – a wireless oscilloscope

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A pair of former engineers from Agilent Technologies are working on a wireless oscilloscope that will connect to an iOS device for its user interface:

The Aeroscope will be a one-channel device where the electronics are in a “pen” form factor. An SMA connector will let you attach mini-grabbers or other probe tips. Analog bandwidth is 100 MHz with 500 Msamples/s sample rate. It should store 10 ksamples of waveform data.

Aeroscope – a wireless oscilloscope – [Link]

Arduino DS18B20 Thermometer on iOS or Android

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maroelawerner @ instructables.com has a tutorial on how to display temperature data on an Android or iOS device using Arduino and Blynk app.

In this Instructable I am going to attempt to show you how to put together a little project to use the Blynk app (optainable at http://www.blynk.cc/) to display the temperature remotely on a iOS or Android device.

I came across an posting on my Google+ where somebody required some help with this. It looked interesting, so I decided to have a try myself.

Arduino DS18B20 Thermometer on iOS or Android – [Link]

IOS-Controlled Arduino waveform generator

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by Annikken @ instructables.com:

This waveform generator is based on the work by Amanda Ghassaei. Waveform generators (or function generators) are used for testing and debugging circuits. e.g. frequency response of op amp or sensors. This waveform generator is powered by Arduino with Annikken Andee shield – a device that lets users create iOS/Android interfaces without iOS or Android programming at all. It outputs sine, triangle, saw and square waves. Frequency is controlled by means of a slider (on iOS/Android device) and wave type is selected using on screen iOS/Android button. With a iOS/Android interface, you can add certain features not possible with hardware buttons. E.g. displaying different ranges of frequencies for each wave type, displaying meaningful controls for certain wave types. For example, the pulse width modulation slider is only visible for square wave types, its not visible for sine, triangle or saw wave forms.

IOS-Controlled Arduino waveform generator – [Link]

Smartphone port? Try the Ear Hole

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by elektor.com

Smartphone peripheral developers are limited to RF links via Bluetooth, NFC or WiFi when they need to pass data back and forth to the device. This can add significantly to costs and stand-alone peripherals also need batteries or an adapter for power. The Quick-Jack from NXP solves both problems; it turns the standard 3.5 mm stereo audio headphone socket found on most iOS or Android smart devices into a self powered data port and provides an interface for external switches, sensors or any other external equipment.

The Smartphone Quick-Jack Solution comprises a small board, a free example app for popular smartphone OSs, and design documentation.

Smartphone port? Try the Ear Hole – [Link]

 

Nix Color Sensor

Nix is a breakthrough smartphone accessory. Just scan an object and instantly view the color on your iPhone, Android, PC, or Mac.

Nix is a patent pending device that allows anyone to become a color expert. Just grab Nix from your pocket, purse, or bag, touch it to an object and magically watch the exact color appear on your iPhone, Android, PC, or Mac. Once scanned, you can keep palettes of your favorite colors, match the color to real life pigments, and even receive directions to the nearest store where you can purchase the color.

Nix Color Sensor – [Link]

Turn a smart phone into a signal generator

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Jacob Beningo writes:

Signal generators are a handy thing to have around the lab. They are perfect for testing inputs on a new hardware design and verifying the behavior of a circuit before connecting all the pieces together. In recent years these lab tools have not only decreased in size but also in cost. The result has been a plethora of portable versions that now exist on the market.

For an engineer-on-the-go, this is very convenient but often times having to bring one more piece of equipment always seems to put the tool bag over the 50 pound limit. This is one reason why it is becoming popular to design lab equipment that can be plugged into a smart phone. Rather than carry around another device with a computer in it, utilizing the computing power and capabilities of the phone allows the device to be smaller, cheaper and weigh less!

Turn a smart phone into a signal generator – [Link]

RK-1 – a wifi Arduino mobile robot for iOS & Android devices

RK-1 is a wifi enabled mobile robot that you control using your iOS or Android tablet or phone that makes your Arduino projects mobile.

The RK-1 is a fun mobile robot, that uses an ad hoc wifi connection, which is controlled using your iOS or Android device.

The control board on the robot is built on the Arduino hardware/software architecture, which is open source, and the controller software and hardware will also be available open source. The idea is to give the community the ability to make Arduino projects mobile. There is no end to what you can do- you can add sensors and actuators to this fun little device and control it remotely.

RK-1 – a wifi Arduino mobile robot for iOS & Android devices – [Link]

RK-1 – a wifi Arduino mobile robot for iOS & Android devices

RK-1 is a wifi enabled mobile robot that you control using your iOS or Android tablet or phone that makes your Arduino projects mobile.

The RK-1 is a fun mobile robot, that uses an ad hoc wifi connection, which is controlled using your iOS or Android device.

The control board on the robot is built on the Arduino hardware/software architecture, which is open source, and the controller software and hardware will also be available open source. The idea is to give the community the ability to make Arduino projects mobile. There is no end to what you can do- you can add sensors and actuators to this fun little device and control it remotely.

RK-1 – a wifi Arduino mobile robot for iOS & Android devices – [Link]

Adafruit launches Circuit Playground app

Adafruit has launched their Circuit Playground app for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. It provides a collection of reference formulas at the touch of a button, simplifying calculations to make your project more fun – [via]

Decipher resistor & capacitor codes with ease. Calculate power, resistance, current, and voltage with the Ohm’s Law & Power Calc modules. Quickly convert between decimal, hexadecimal, binary or even ASCII characters. Calculate values for multiple resistors or capacitors in series & parallel configurations. Store, search, and view PDF datasheets. Access exclusive sneak peaks, deals & discounts at Adafruit Industries. All that, plus updates with additional features & enhancements – MANY NEW CALCULATORS AND TOOLS being added!

Adafruit launches Circuit Playground app – [Link]