Tag Archives: IoT

RAK8211-NB iTracker – An All Weather IoT Board designed for Asset Tracking with Bluetooth 5.0

In the last few years, we have seen a lot of love poured towards the hardware ecosystem especially hardware related to the Internet of Things applications (hardly would you find any board that doesn’t have one or two IoT offerings). Some boards give basic IoT functionality like providing you with a basic IoT connectivity interface with no extra add-ons while some boards goes the extra mile by providing more, RAK8211-NB iTracker is one of those boards.

RAK8211-NB iTracker

Rak Wireless, the Chinese based hardware company has recently launched a new IoT focused board called the RAK8211-NB iTracker based on the Quectel BC95-G NB-IoT Module, Nordic Semi nRF52832 Bluetooth 5 chip, and Quectel L70-R GNSS module. The Quectel BC95-G is a high-performance NB-IoT module which supports multiple frequency bands of B1/B3/B8/B5/B20/B28* with extremely low power consumption. The ultra-compact 23.6mm × 19.9mm × 2.2mm profile makes it a perfect choice for size-sensitive applications like the RAK8211-NB iTracker. The Quectel provides a flexible and scalable platform for migrating from GSM/GPRS to NB-IoT networks.

The RAK8211-NB is a module geared towards asset tracking and management due to its arrays of features, and it’s one of those board that supports the new Bluetooth 5.0. The board includes a vast array of connectivity options (NB-IoT, BLE 5.0 and GPS). The asset tracker module comes with five different sensors to monitor motion and environmental data, and can optionally be powered directly by a solar panel. It comes with accompanying sensors like an accelerometer, a light sensor and a barometric sensor. At the heart of the RAK8211-NB is the Nordic NRF52832 SoC. The nRF52832 SoC is built around a 32-bit ARM® Cortex™-M4F CPU with 512kB + 64kB RAM. The embedded 2.4GHz transceiver supports Bluetooth Low Energy, ANT, and proprietary 2.4 GHz protocol stack.

The RAK8211-NB module is Arduino friendly and can be programmed using the IDE. The board also provides SWD interface for programming the NRF52832 core. The combination of BLE and NB-IoT offers flexible low power consumption development along with a myriad of application option ranging from telemetry to live tracking and environment sensing. The RAK8211-NB iTracker provides applications in the following areas:

  • Vehicle location/fleet transportation management.
  • Safety monitoring of old/young children.
  • Animal protection and animal husbandry management.
  • Asset tracking and management.
  • Prototyping for NB-IoT Applications.

The below are some of the specifications of the module:

  • Connectivity
    • NB-IoT via Quectel BC95-G (Global) wireless communication module + SIM card socket
    • Bluetooth 5 via Nordic Semi nRF52832 Arm Cortex-M4F micro-controller (Arduino compatible)
    • GPS/GLONASS via Quectel L70 GNSS module
  • Sensors
    • LIS3DH ultra-low-power, high-performance 3-axes “nano” accelerometer
    • LIS2MDL ultra-low-power, high-performance 3-axis digital magnetic sensor.
    • Tilt sensor
    • BME280 pressure, humidity and temperature sensor
    • The OPT3001 intensity of light sensor
  • Expansion – 3x headers with SWD, 2x sensor out + tilt out (also usable as GPIO and analog inputs), 3.3V, GND, and reset
  • Power Supply – 3.5V to 18V via solar panel (P2) or battery (P3)
  • Dimensions – 43mm x 38mm x 18mm
  • Temperature Range – 40°C to +85°CBLE Features

The company provides instructions to use the module with the Arduino IDE, Espruino (JavaScript) and Arm Keil tools. The RAK8211-NB iTracker kit is available and sells for $98.40 + shipping on Aliexpress. Rak Wireless also offers another variant of RAK8211 with RAK8211-G based on the most of the same features, except GPRS is used instead of NB-IoT. It is sold for $87.40 + shipping.

BlkBox BB-E01P – The World’s Smallest ESP8285-Based WiFi Module

Back in March 2016, Espressif Announced the ESP8285 Wi-Fi Chip, a supposed killer of the favorite ESP8266 chip. The new chip is an ESP8266, but with the flash memory onboard –  1MB flash memory. Espressif’s ESP8285 delivers highly integrated Wi-Fi SoC solution to meet users’ constant demands for efficient power usage, compact design and reliable performance in the Internet of Things industry. With the complete and self-contained Wi-Fi networking capabilities, ESP8285 can perform either as a standalone application or as the slave to a host MCU. When ESP8285 hosts the application, it promptly boots up from the flash. The Chip is also ultra-small as compared to the ESP8266 making it suitable for applications like in wearables.

Taiwan based Blkbox may have designed the world’s smallest WiFi IoT module with their Espressif Systems ESP8285 based BB-E01P module which is pin-compatible with the ESP-01 module, and measuring just 10×14 mm. Several ESP8285 modules have been released, but the Blkbox version is probably the smallest ever. Itead Studio’s PSF-A85, an ESP8285 Wireless Module measures just 14mm*135mm, and even the Electrodragon ESP8285 WiFi module measures 15.5mm x 17.8mm. With this, the Blkbox module might be the smallest we currently have. The BB-E01P is the equivalent of the Blkbox predecessor BB-E01 with reduced dimensions.

BB-E01P ESP8285 Pinout

The following are the specification of the Blkbox BB-E01P ESP8285 WiFi module:

  • WiFi SoC – Espressif ESP8285 WiFi SoC with 1MB internal flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi with chip antenna
  • Expansion – 8-pin (2.54mm pitch) with Tx/Rx, CP, RS, GPIO0, GPIO2, 3V, GND (Same layout as ESP-01)
  • Interface – UART
  • Misc – Jumper supports Deep Sleep Mode (AT+GSLP)
  • Firmware Version: AT v1.6 / SDK v2.2
  • Power Supply – 3V -3.6V
  • Dimensions – 10 x 14 mm
  • Pin Pitch – 2.54mm

The Blkbox board is preloaded with the firmware version AT v1.5/SDK v2.2. Just like every other Blkbox boards, the module can be purchased on Tindie for $6.80 + shipping.

AIOT-MSSP01 – AAEON’s Intelligent Vending Development Kit & UP Board

(Taipei, Taiwan – April 24, 2018) – AAEON, a leading developer of industrial computers and intelligent retail systems, releases an updated version of its Intelligent Vending Development Kit. The kit is a complete hardware solution that makes it easier than ever before for retailers to implement the latest smart vending technologies.

The kit includes a vending machine controller unit, a separate UP Board PC unit to handle the interactive retail functions, a motor for the machine’s internal mechanisms, a camera, a QR Code device, and all the cables needed to connect these components. Additional WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity components are also available on request.

AAEON is now offering two versions of its Intelligent Vending Development Kit, but both come with the Windows 10 IoT Enterprise OS and a customer-friendly API pre-installed. The kits also utilize the power of the UP Board and its Intel® Atom™ x5-z8350 processor and DDR3L memory to manage a fast, effective facial recognition program.

As a customer approaches the vending machine, an image of their face is captured and their age range, gender and mood are detected. Based on the results, a particular set of products are recommended. Crucially, the process happens almost instantaneously, so there’s no risk of the customer being inconvenienced.

The latest version of the development kit also incorporates Microsoft Azure and Power BI services. With this service, information about every product sold and the gender, age range and mood of each buyer is collated by Azure and broken down by Power BI’s data analytics tools. The result is real-time inventory control information and a series of insightful customer behavior reports and charts that operators can access at any time. Users who buy this version of the development kit will also receive a 60-day free trial for the Power BI Pro service.

“Intelligent vending machines represent the future of automatic retailing,” AAEON design manufacturing product manager Brenda Huang said. “Increasingly, customers are both expecting and relying on intelligent, interactive systems, and the data these machines collect will also give businesses an edge over their competitors.”

HioTron IoT Kit – A Modular and Enterprise IoT Development Kit

HioTron IoT Kit is a modular and enterprise IoT kit that is entirely pre-programmed prototyping kit for quickly building and testing IoT concepts. All modules are plug-n-play, allowing for flexible prototyping, customization & production. This set of kit is made by the Indian based company HioTron, which specializes in IoT solutions development. This Kit includes Hardware, IoT Platform & User App/Dashboard needed to build quickly any IoT application right from Scratch to Production.

Hiotron Development Kit

One of the challenges that come with embarking on IoT project is that of the platform, software, wireless standard, API, and hardware selection. We have numerous IoT enabled hardware in the market, with each having their own software stack and also several IoT platforms available to pick from. The process of going through these selection pools, valuable and productivity time could be lost and still not arrive at something that genuinely works or is efficient. Hiotron’s goal is to solve this by providing a complete package that can be used from PoC (Proof Of Concept) to Production. HioTron complete IoT solution which includes not only the hardware building blocks (Nodes & Gateway) needed to quickly prototype a wireless IoT system from scratch but most importantly hIOTron enterprise IoT™ Platform is integrated with custom mobile application & GUI dashboard that enable user to get up and run PoC of any idea as easily and quickly as possible.

The IoT Kit is ideal for makers, enthuthat siast, startups and even organization that wants to embark on IoT projects in the areas of smart cities, agriculture, industrial & smart factories, energy, healthcare, logistics, and several others. The kit is modular which means you can easily stack in add-ons on top of existing ones or add another device to the network infrastructure. The kit includes the following:

  • Hi-Node
  • Hi-Gate
  • hIOTron IoT Platform
  • Dashboard and Mobile App

Hi-Node

Hi-Node is a battery (2700 mAh Li-ion) or USB [Optional] powered wireless node which comes with 4 output channels to control real-world devices using 4 relays (Output 5A 230VAC) with 4 connectors and 4 universal (Analog/Digital) input channels to communicate with real-world sensors and transmit this information to IoT gateway using wireless (Zig-bee & BLE4.0) protocols.

Hi-Node

Hi-Node provides standard interface that offers not only remote monitoring but also control capability for managing many types of devices and it also offers advanced Edge Analytics & Local storage. The Hi-Node ZigBee is based on the Digikey Wired XBee module which boasts a range of about 80 – 100 meters line of sight and about 40 meters indoor. The Hi-Node is based around the ATmega328P with 2KB of SRAM, 32KB of Flash memory, and 1KB of EEPROM.

Hi-Gate

Hi-Gate is the brain of this kit which is fully Modular & Enterprise IoT gateway and which doesn’t only translate the protocol [RF/ NON-RF –To– REST/MQTT] but has TI CC3200 at its heart. The Gateway device comes with Zig-Bee and BLE4.0 to support its local network infrastructure with the Hi-Nodes and an outbound connectivity for connecting to the outside world using Wi-Fi 802.11 B/G/N Radio, Ethernet, and Cellular connectivity (2G, 3G, and 4G).

Hi-Gate

The Gateway device supports dual mode of operation – As a Node or Gateway. The Hi-Gate can support up to 25 wireless Hi-Nodes and offers an auto-reconnect for Wi-Fi and GSM network.

The following are the specification of the Hi-Gate:

Hardware System
  • Controller: ARM Cortex-M4 Core at 80 MHz
  • Flash: 1MB Serial Flash Memory
  • RAM: 256KB
  • EEPROM: 512KB External
Interface
  • Power input: 9-12V DC
  • 2-GPIO Port Pins
  • 2-Analog Port Pins
  • RTC
WiFi Specs
  • IEEE 802.11 b/g/n
  • Frequency Band: 2.4 ~ 2.462 GHz

HioTron IoT Platform

The hIOTron IoT Platform supports five major D’s such as Device Management, Device Connectivity, Data Storage, Data Analytics and Dashboard/Application enabled for the management of an IoT project life cycle. The Hi-Gate stream data to the hIOTron platform where all the analytics, storage, automation will be carried out.

The Hiotron IOT Platform

Dashboard & Mobile App

You can monitor & control your project application through the Dashboard & Mobile Application provide by HioTron and do unlimited customization from anywhere, anytime.

The Modular & Enterprise IoT development kit comes in 3 versions are Standard, Advance & Customized which can be selected based on applications requirement. The kit pricing is currently not disclosed. More information about the Kit can be found here and for more details on about getting started with the kit can be found here.

Microchip’s New Open Source SAMA5D27 SOM Module Runs Mainline Linux

American microcontroller manufacturer company Microchip has unveiled an open source, mainline Linux ready “SAMA5D27 SOM” module. This module is based on a SiP implementation of its Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D27 SoC with 128MB RAM. The 40 x 38mm module is also compatible with a SOM1-EK1 dev board.

SAMA5D27 SOM1

SAMA5D27 SOM1
SAMA5D27 SOM1

The SAMA5D27 SOM is Microchip’s first computer-on-module based on a Linux-ready application processor, and the first SiP-based module built around a SAMA5 SoC. It is mainly designed for rugged IoT applications and the module can be soldered onto a baseboard for versatile ease of use. It offers long-term availability and supports industrial grade -40 to 85°C temperature range.

The SAMA5D27 SOM1 combines the RAM-ready SAMA5D27C-D1G SiP with 64Mb of non-volatile QSPI boot flash and a 10/100 Ethernet PHY.  The module also integrates a 2Kb EEPROM with pre-programmed MAC address. The SOM is further equipped with a PMIC and a 3.3V power supply. Typical power consumption ranges from 120mA to 160mA. There’s also a 60mA idle mode and an ultra-low 30mA mode.

This module has 128 GPIO pins including 2x USB 2.0 host, one USB device, and 2x SD/MMC interfaces with eMMC 4.51 support. There is also support for 10x UART, 7x SPI, 2x CAN, camera and audio interfaces, and much more.

Like the Xplained boards, the module is open source, from the mainline Linux support to the posting of open schematics, design, Gerber, and BoM files for both the SOM and the optional SOM1-EK1 development board.

SAMA5D2 SiP

SAMA5D2 SiP
SAMA5D2 SiP

The newly launched SAMA5D2 SiP is built around the Microchip SAMA5D2. The FreeRTOS-focused 128MB version uses a lower-end SAM5D22 model limited to 16-bit DDR2 RAM while the Linux-ready 512MB and 1GB versions use the higher end SAMA5D27 and SAMA5D28, respectively, with 16/32-bit DDR. All the models are renowned for offering CAN support, and because the SAMA5D28 also adds security features, it’s the only one that is pre-certified for PCI Security.

The SAMA5D has fewer I/O pins and slower performance (166-500MHz) compared to the earlier, 600MHz SAMA5D4, but the power consumption is significantly lower. The SAMA5D2 SoC can run at less than 150mW in active mode at 500MHz with all peripherals activated, and at less than 0.5mW in low power mode with SRAM and registers retention.

SOM1-EK1 development board

SOM1-EK1 Development Board
SOM1-EK1 Development Board

The SAMA5D27-SOM1-EK1 development kit is built around a baseboard with a soldered SAMA5D27-SOM1 module with the 128MB (1Gb) configuration. This board is enhanced with SD and microSD slots, as well as a 10/100 Ethernet port, a micro-USB host port, and a micro-USB device port with power input.

Additional I/O option for this dev board includes USB HSIC, CAN, JLINK, and JTAG interfaces. There’s a tamper connector, 4x push buttons, an LED, supercapacitor backup, and an ATECC508 CryptoAuthentication device. A Linux4SAM BSP is available with Linux kernel and drivers.

The ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 is available for $39, and the ATSAMA5D27-SOM1-EK1 development board is available for $245 each. The ATSAMA5D2 SiP starts at for $8.62 each. More information may be found in Microchip’s SAMA5D2 SiP and SOM announcement and launch page, which points to SOM and SiP pages, as well as the SAMA5D27-SOM1-EK1 dev board page.

Phytec Develops Three PhyCore Modules – i.MX8, i.MX8M, and iMX8X, Driven By Linux

Phytec has updated their product pages for three new PhyCore modules, all of which support Linux. The three modules, which employ three different flavors of i.MX8 SOC is phyCORE-i.MX 8Xi.MX 8M, and i.MX 8 SBCs. The PhyCore COMs are based on NXP’s Cortex-A53 based i.MX8M, its -A53 and -A72 equipped i.MX8 Quad, and its -A35 based i.MX8X.

phyCore-i.MX 8X

phyCORE-i.MX 8X module
phyCORE-i.MX 8X module

The i.MX8X SoC found on the phyCORE-i.MX 8X module. This board focuses on industrial IoT applications. i.MX8X includes up to 4x cores that comply with Arm’s Cortex-A35.

The i.MX8X SoC is further equipped with a single Cortex-M4 microcontroller, a Tensilica HiFi 4 DSP, and a multi-format VPU that supports up to 4K playback and HD encoding.

There’s no onboard wireless support, but support for dual GbE controllers (1x onboard, 1x RGMII) are available. There are MIPI-CSI and parallel camera interfaces, as well as ESAI based audio.

phyCore-i.MX 8M

phyCORE-i.MX 8M module
phyCORE-i.MX 8M module

The phyCORE-i.MX 8M supports the NXP i.MX8M Quad and QuadLite, both with 4x Cortex-A53 cores, as well as the dual-core Dual. All are clocked to 1.5GHz. They all have 266MHz Cortex-M4F cores and Vivante GC7000Lite GPUs, but only the Quad and Dual models support 4Kp60, H.265, and VP9 video capabilities.

In addition to the i.MX8M SoC, which offers “128 KB + 32 KB” RAM, the module ships with the same memory features as the phyCore-i.MX 8X except that it lacks the SPI flash. Once again, you get 512MB to 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM and either 128MB to 1GB NAND flash or 4GB to 128GB eMMC. This 3.3V module supports an RTC, watchdog, and tamper protection.

phyCore-i.MX 8

phyCORE-i.MX 8 module
phyCORE-i.MX 8 module

The phyCORE-i.MX 8, is ideal for image and speech recognition. It is the third module to support NXP’s top-of-the-line, 64-bit i.MX8 series. The module supports all three flavors of i.MX8 while the other two COMs we’ve seen have been limited to the high-end QuadMax: Toradex’s Apalis iMX8 and iWave’s iW-RainboW-G27M.

i.MX8 QuadMax features dual high-end Cortex-A72 cores clocked at 1.6GHz plus four Cortex-A53 cores. The i.MX8 QuadPlus design is the same, but with only one Cortex-A72 core, and the quad has no -A72 cores.

The 73 x 45mm phyCORE-i.MX 8 supports up to 8GB LPDDR4 RAM. Like the phyCORE-i.MX 8X, the module provides 64MB to 256MB of Micron Octal SPI/DualSPI flash. There’s no NAND option, but you get 4GB to 128GB eMMC.

More information may be found in Phytec’s phyCORE-i.MX 8XphyCORE-i.MX 8M, and phyCORE-i.MX 8 product pages as well as the phyBoard-Polaris SBC product page.

The Orange Pi 4G IoT Board is the Most Advanced Orange Pi Board

Orange Pi has been known for its several Raspberry Pi board clones and now has launched a better IoT focused board – Orange Pi 4G IoT. The Shenzhen based company, Xulong has gone through different modifications and even as at last year released a low-cost 2G based board – The Orange Pi 2G IoT board that cost just $9.90. However, recent trends have been gearing towards 4G technology, and some countries like Australia are already outfacing the old 2G networks.

Orange Pi 4G IoT Board

Therefore, it did not come as a big shock when the company released a 4G board recently. But it is clear that Shenzhen Xulong outdid itself as the board has a lot interesting and advanced features such as its 4G LTE module, fingerprint sensor support, WiFi, GPS and many more. The Orange Pi 4G IoT board is the most advanced Orange Pi board till date. Like many other Orange Pi boards, the Orange Pi 4G – IoT has a Raspberry Pi like footprint which measurements are 85mm × 55mm and a 40 – pin expansion header.

At the heart of the Orange Pi 4G IoT board is the MediaTek MT6737 SoC. The MediaTek SoC is a 64bit Quad-core, Cortex-A53 and clocked from 1.1GHz to 1.3GHz. There’s also a high-end, up to 650MHz Mali-T720 MP1 GPU with the SoC.

The Orange Pi 4G – IoT Single Board Computer (SBC) runs Andriod 6.0 has a 4G LTE radio module with a mini-SIM card slot, a fingerprint sensor support and a combo module that includes WiFi, FM, GPS, and Bluetooth. There’s also a mic and an earphone jack. The board has a PRX receiver which could be a potential source for the fingerprint reader or a proximity sensor module. The Orange Pi 4G-IOT also includes a three USB 2.0 OTG host ports, a micro-USB port, and an IR receiver.

The below are specifications of the Orange Pi 4G board:

  • Processor —
    • MediaTek MT6737 (4x Cortex-A53)
    • Mali-T720 MP1 GPU
  • Memory/storage:
    • 1GB of DDR3
    • 8GB of eMMC
    • MicroSD slot with hot-plug support
  • Display/Media:
    • HDMI port for HD resolution
    • LCD interface with capacitive touch support
    • 13-megapixel camera interface (25-pin ZIF)
    • 3.5mm earphone UI/O audio jack
    • Mic
  • Wireless:
    • WiFi, Bluetooth, FM, and GPS combo module
    • 4G LTE module (FDD-LTE B1/B2/B3/B4/B7/B17/B20; TDD-LTE B38/B40/B41B; GSM 850/900/1800/1900; WCDMA B1-B8,
    • Mini-SIM card slot
    • Diversity receiving part (antenna connector)
    • Antennas (may be optional)
  • Other I/O:
    • 3x USB OTG host ports
    • Micro-USB port (only for writing image)
    • 40-pin expansion header (2x UART, 3x I2C, 2x SPI, 1.8V)
  • Other features — IR receiver; 2x LEDs; PRX receiver for attaching fingerprint reader
  • Power — 5V 2A input; power button; battery supported
  • Weight — 42.5 g
  • Dimensions — 85 x 55mm
  • Operating system — Android 6.0 with C, C++, Kotlin, Java, Shell, and Python support

Although the Orange Pi 4G IoT board is not listed on the Orange Pi website and has no official product page or wiki page, it is surprisingly available for purchase on Aliexpress and costs only $45.

Program Pi, BeagleBone and Other Linux SBCs On The Arduino Create Platform

We have seen the massive ecosystem the Arduino has built and established over the last few years and this has made developing with Arduino quite leisurely. It is way easier to solve a programming issue or hardware issue with Arduino unlike other hardware boards mostly due to its community.  Arduino Create is an online platform by the Arduino Team that simplifies building a project as a whole, without having to switch between many different tools to manage the aspects of whatever you are making.

Arduino Create

Arduino Create is excellent especially for people already used to build stuff with Arduino boards, but what about the likes of Raspberry Pi, BeagleBones, and other makers board? The Arduino boards are great, especially the famous Arduino Uno, but this board still have it’s limitations too. The Raspberry Pi/BeagleBone on the other hand could take some task that the 16MHz Arduino Uno will never dream of doing, but this will also require makers and developers to begin learning new hardware (could be daunting for beginners). But this is changing now, as Massimo Banzi, CTO, and Arduino co-founder announced an expansion of Arduino Create to support Arm boards which will provide optimized support for the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone boards.

Arduino Create now integrates Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and other Linux based SBCs ─ all with IoT in mind. The introduction of ARM boards (Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, AAEON® UP² board, and Custom ARM boards) follows the vision of the Arduino’s goal for the Create platform. A vision to build a full featured IoT development platform for developing IoT (Internet of Things) devices quicker, faster, and easier than ever before, intended for Makers, Engineers or Professional Developers. Arduino Creates brings the Arduino framework and libraries to all these SBCs, officially, changing the development game in a big way.

“With this release, Arduino extends its reach into edge computing, enabling anybody with Arduino programming experience to manage and develop complex multi-architecture IoT applications on gateways,” stated Massimo Banzi in a press release. “This is an important step forward in democratizing access to the professional Internet of Things.”

Raspberry Pi and other Linux based ARM boards can now leverage the community surrounding the Arduino Create Platform that offers support for step-by-step guides, examples, code, schematics and even projects. Although the SBC support is brand new, resources surrounding SBCs is sure to grow, in short time. Import from or sharing with the community is easy too.

Multiple Arduino programs can run simultaneously on a Linux-based board and interact and communicate with each other, leveraging the capabilities provided by the new Arduino Connector. Moreover, IoT devices can be managed and updated remotely, independently from where they are located.

Getting started with Arduino Create for the Linux SBCs is quite easy and straightforward. One merely connect the Raspberry Pi, or whatever SBC of choice to a computer and connect it to the cloud via Arduino Connect or via USB using the Arduino Plugin (This will make possible the communication between the USB ports on your PC and your Arm®-based Platform.). To start developing, upload sketches (programs) from the browser to the SBC. No need to install anything to get the code to compile, everything is up-to-date. This may become a standard way to develop on these platforms.

Arduino Create currently works with any board that runs Debian OS; a case for the Raspberry Rasbian, which is a Debian OS. To get started building with the Arduino Create for your ARM-based boards, visit the Arduino Create site, and click on the Getting Started while setting the board of your choice.

AI Core – Artificial Intelligence On The Edge

The first embedded ultra-compact Artificial Intelligence processing card for on the edge computing

UP Bridge the Gap – a brand of AAEON Europe – is proud to launch AI Core: the first embedded ultra-compact Artificial Intelligence processing cards for edge computing.

AI Core is a mini-PCIe module powered by Intel® Movidius™ Myriad™ 2 technology. This low-power module enhances industrial IoT edge devices with hardware accelerated deep learning and enhanced machine vision functionality. AAEON Technology is one of the first IPC manufacturers to address the growing need for Artificial Intelligence on the edge with dedicated hardware.

Most of the available IoT solutions are focused on connecting edge devices to the cloud and these deployments face challenges related to latency, network bandwidth, reliability and security. Experts in this field agree that not all the tasks and decision making processes can be addressed in cloud-only models. AI Core is the solution for cloud limitations by bringing AI performance and hardware acceleration not “at” but “ON” the edge of the Internet of Things.

AI Core is powered by an advanced vision processing unit: the Intel® Movidius™ Myriad™ 2 VPU. With 512 MB onboard DDR memory this mini card module requires very little energy to enable local deep-learning and computing vision algorithms. (more…)

18 Most Helpful Raspberry Pi Tutorials

The Raspberry Pi

After having grazed the maker’s ecosystem in the year 2012, the Raspberry Pi has attracted a huge number of hobbyists and tinkerers all over the world. It has been the world’s most popular single board computer and a close competitor to the Arduino since then. If you have never heard of the Raspberry Pi, then look at wikipedia article.

Despite the huge fame that has followed the Raspberry Pi and some amazing projects created with it, some questions are still being asked like; What can you do with it and why would you want to? I remember when I first got my own Raspberry Pi back in 2013, I never touched it for about a year because this sort of questions was ramping on my head and couldn’t find any convincing answer then.

The Raspberry Pi is a great single-board computer that has grazed the surface of the earth with some amazing power and capabilities that are often underestimated. There is hardly anything you can not build with the Raspberry Pi, and yes, you can even build a Raspberry Pi Artificial Intelligence Cluster (build your own Jarvis, my favorite project). If you’re new to the life of Pi or mid-level into the into Pi then this post will provide some helpful Raspberry Pi tutorials and resources to help you fully utilize the Pi.

Getting Started with Raspberry Pi

This is a must tutorial for newbies and it basically sums up the bits of getting the Raspberry Pi out of the box and making your first Hello World program. It covers the general discussion about the Raspberry Pi, installing the Raspberry OS, OS choices, applications of the Raspberry Pi, and several others.

Installing Raspbian OS

Despite the fact that the Raspberry Pi can be used with some other operating system, the Raspbian OS has been the most commonly used on the Pi. These guides will focus mainly on installing the Raspbian OS on the Raspberry Pi.  It works in a way similar to what you see on windows, when the Pi boots, it will look for a specific boot file on the SD card, and once that file has been found, it will begin to execute the code inside and the OS loads.

Python for the Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi can be programmed with different programming languages, including Java, C, C++, and Python. Despite the fact that all these languages work quite well on the Raspberry Pi, Python is the most used of all mostly due to its flexible and easy language. Learning different languages is the best thing that any maker can do, but as a first language, Python is a good language to start with. There are many tutorials on Python online (even a few on Maker.io), so here are a whole bunch of them

IoT

Internet of Things is now becoming the mainstream buzz and learning how to build your own IoT-enabled projects for the Pi can allow the Pi to be accessed over the internet, control external devices using a mobile device, and take sensor readings and print them to a website is going to be a good idea.

Others

The above tutorials and resources could be the life-saving guide you might need to start creating with the Raspberry Pi. Some of the projects demonstrated have shown how capable the single board computer can be.