Tag Archives: IR

Control Your IR Devices With Your Smartphone Bluetooth

Managing some of house devices with its IR remotes may be annoying if you are out of its line of sight. You will have to interrupt the work you are doing, move to another room, turn down the volume of your Hi-Fi for example, then go back and resume your work. Assume you can use bluetooth instead of this process, it will be a time saver and it will maintain your focus.

Using an Arduino UNO with IR and Bluetooth shields, you can create your own bluetooth-controlled general purpose remote control. Bluetooth is a good choice because it doesn’t need any active network to connect with a mobile device. Connection between them is direct (point-to-point) and is suitable for small areas. However, by using a wireless shield you will be able to control the devices through the internet.

A project by Open Electronics demonstrates how to build and program such a device. Its hardware side consists of an Arduino with two shields, and the software side is an Android application. The tutorial shows in details how each shield will work, and also how to setup and prepare the mobile application.

Parts needed for the project:

  • An Arduino Uno board or equivalent (e.g. Fishino Uno);
  • An ArdIR shield:An Arduino shield that allows creating a programmable infrared universal remote manageable from the Internet. It simulates the remote control of TVs, home appliances and air conditioners, by transmitting the same data to the desired.
  • A Bluetooth shield:
    A shield for Arduino based on the RN-42 module. It also has a dip switch that allows you to set up the modes of operation of the module RN-42.
  • A smartphone or tablet with Android OS (version 4.1 or higher), of course complete with a Bluetooth interface.

The mobile application is compatible with Android OS devices of version 4.1 (jellybean) and higher. It needs two phases to be handled:

  1. Research and connection to the target Bluetooth device.
  2. Selection and activating one of the channels, for transmitting the code to the shield.

Once the connection with the Bluetooth shield is established and the channel is selected, the program will be ready to handle a subsequent command by the user and will be listening to possible result messages returned by the remote Bluetooth device.

There is no need for additional hardware parts and work, you only have  to assemble both shields on the Arduino board. But before that, you have to upload a sketch to Arduino for handling the ArdIR shield and managing the communication with the Bluetooth shield.

For more information about how the project works, the structure of the application and source files, you can read the original guide.

Blue IR: Build your own universal remote

Sarunas built this device to replace a bunch of different remote controls with a smart phone.

Controlling TV, HiFi, DLP and similar IR controllable stuff is easy and fun from a smart phone using previously built smart remote, until it runs out of battery. Despite that Bluetooth Low Energy device (smart remote is built on it) uses so little of it, the battery will eventually run out.

Blue IR: Build your own universal remote – [Link]

64 Key Infrared Remote Controller using PT2222M – NEC Code

64 channels Infra-Red Remote Transmitter circuit build around PT2222M IC, The IC is pin to pin compatible with NEC uPD6122 respectively, the remote is capable of controlling 64 functions keys and 3 double keys. The PT2222M Infra-red remote control transmission ICs using the NEC transmission format that is ideally suited for TVs, DVD Players, Audio Equipment, Air Condition, etc. By combining external diode and resistors, maximum of 65536 custom codes can be specified. The NEC transmission format consists of leader codes, custom codes (16 Bits), and data codes (16 Bits). It can be used for various systems through decoding by a microcontroller.

Features

  • Low Voltage 2V To 3.3V
  • Low Current dissipation: 1uA Max (Standby)
  • Custom Codes: 65536 (Set by optional provided diodes and resistors)
  • 64 Codes (Single Input) , 3 Codes ( Double Input) , Expandable up to 128 Codes through J1 Jumper

64 Key Infrared Remote Controller using PT2222M – NEC Code – [Link]

IRis – An Infrared Sensor using Photodiode amplification Circuit

IRis_PCB

[devttys0] designed a sensitive IR detector for capturing weak infrared signals. He shared in detail how he designed the circuit, beginning from the basic components, walking through solving the problems and finally ended up with a complete working circuit.

Craig Heffner/[devttys0] built this circuit for a friend’s Defcon talk, Blinded by the Light, the talk concerned about the emitted IR signals from the IR proximity detector in our devices like mobiles, and how we can identify the type of the device/OS using these signals.

Craig wanted to build a general purpose IR detector to capture and analysis the raw IR transmissions where IR receivers is designed to sense the modulated IR signals at 36-38 kHz. “But there is so much more to the world of IR than this” Craig said.

The first basic idea in the design is to use transimpedance amplifier which is basically a current-to-voltage converter.
When photons strike the photo diode, it will actually emit charge carriers, so the output of this sensor is a current. The output voltage (Vout= Ip*Rf) is linear in respect to the current.

IRis_cir1

The major problem with this particular configuration is the unwanted high frequency oscillation, so a capacitor was added in parallel with the feedback resistor.

IRis_cir2

The next problem solved by Craig, is the saturation of the amplifier in high and low side by adding some bias resistors just to keep the reference voltage of the positive input of the op-amp at just under 200 millivolts.

To prevent saturation in high side he added three diodes, in fact three JFETs configured as diode, in the feedback path. The reason of using JFET configured as a diode is that it has less leakage current than normal silicon diodes, so when the voltage exceeds 3*0.7=2.1V then they short the feedback resistor, this point is important in our design because it has a current flow from photo diode.

The last thing to solve in first stage of the design is the problem of constant current from ambient light, which will generate a DC component in the output. So Craig added a high pass filter in the output.

IRis_cir3

Now the circuit will still have some analog signals in output, noise and some negative spikes. So he cleaned things up by using a comparator with a Schottky diode in the non-inverting input to omit the negative pulses less than 0.2 Volt.

IRis_cir4

To see the full details of the design you can see the video below, and also you can reach the design files (SCH & PCB) over Github.

In addition, you can see the references pointed by Craig in his site analogzoo.

TV Tuner IR remote with a PIC16F684

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Tahmid built a TV tuner IR remote with a PIC16F684:

I then proceeded to write an IR transmitter using the PIC16F684 (using the MPLAB X IDE and XC8 compiler), following the timing information from the extended NEC protocol. In order to connect all the keys, I connected them in matrix keypad form.
In order to power the remote off 2xAA batteries, it is necessary to use sleep mode – otherwise the battery will be drained extremely quickly. So, in order to detect when a button is pressed, an interrupt is used. After the IR command is sent, the microcontroller goes to sleep. The interrupt wakes up the microcontroller when a button is pressed. Debouncing is achieved using simple software delays. When a button is held down, the NEC command repeat sequence is not sent. Instead, the remote relies on releasing the button and pressing it again.

TV Tuner IR remote with a PIC16F684 – [Link]

One Channel Infra Red Remote Controller

H015-500x500

One Channel Infra-Red Remote and receiver with onboard Relay provides normally open and normally closed output. The project based on PIC12F683 Microcontroller from Microchip , TSOP1738 used as Infra-Red receiver. Micro-controller decodes the RC5 serial data coming from TSOP1738 and provides high output if the data is valid. The output can be set Momentary or Latch using on board Jumper (J1) and closure. The board provided with 3 LEDs, Power LED, Valid Transmission LED and Output LED. This Remote works with switch No1 of RC5 Remote.

Features

  • Power Supply Remote 2X AA Batteries
  • Power Supply Receiver 7-12V DC
  • Current Consumption Receiver 30mA
  • Onboard jumper for momentary and latch operation selection
  • Transmitter range 10-15 feet
  • RC5 (Philips) Remote
  • Onboard power LED
  • Onboard output ON/OFF LED
  • Onboard Valid Transmission LED
  • Onboard 5V regulator
  • PCB Dimensions 59.06 MM X 29.53 MM

One Channel Infra Red Remote Controller – [Link]

Arduino IR remote and Software controller

IR_remote

This is a DIY Infrared remote for speakers, replacing the original. Arduino Nano and controlled via a custom .NET application and placed in a laser cut enclosure.

This one is an interesting one, it’s something we’ve been looking at for a while and figuring out how to solve it. We have sets of speakers and projectors and the users keep losing the remotes, or misplaced/stolen. Usually this wouldn’t be a problem, we’ll just contact the supplier or manufacturer and order replacements. Except we can’t any more.

We have a set of Vision AV-1000 wall mounted active speakers, connected to an EPSON projector. Projector remotes are easy to come by, but the AV-1000 remote is no longer manufactured. The speakers do not have any manual controls for the input selection, bass/treble etc. only a volume control on the back.

Arduino IR remote and Software controller – [Link]

Arduino Remote Control Tutorial

arduino-remote-control-1024x801

Øyvind Nydal Dahl show us how to use an IR remote control with Arduino. For this purpose he connects a TSOP312 and an IR LED to Arduino and goes in detail on the sketches.

In this tutorial I am going to show you exactly how to make an Arduino remote control. You can use this project to combine functions from different remote controls and make your super-awesome dream remote control!

Arduino Remote Control Tutorial – [Link]

Arduino IR thermometer using the MLX90614 IR temperature sensor

In this video we learn how to build a very usefull project. An Infrared thermometer, using the MLX90614 IR temperature sensor and the a Nokia 5110 LCD display shield. We are also using an Arduino Uno but you can use any Arduino board you like.

Arduino IR thermometer using the MLX90614 IR temperature sensor – [Link]

Photoplethysmography – IR Heart Rate Monitor

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SteveQuinn @ instructables.com show us how to create a heart rate monitor using an IR phototransistor and Arduino and display the data on a TFT screen.

This Instructable documents how to create a simple heart rate monitor using Photoplethysmography with an IR phototransistor via transmissive absorption using the Arduino to process the pulsatile data and display live results via a TFT screen.

To use the source code and create the necessary circuitry you will need a reasonable grasp of electronics, knowledge of the Arduino, a DMM and some patience.

Photoplethysmography – IR Heart Rate Monitor – [Link]