Tag Archives: IR

IR remote tester

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Who never had the need to test a TV or DVD remote?

I have several times. My favorite technique was to take my mobile phone and with the camera pointed at the infrared emitter look for a flashing little purple light. The mobile phone technique is an way for testing the remote but still i decided to make a small circuit just to test the remotes.

IR remote tester – [Link]

Simple, easy and cheap wireless presenter

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by Dimitris Platis @ instructables.com:

During presentations, I avoid being stationary and generally like to walk around in order to increase the interaction between me and the audience. However, I am constantly being faced with the burden of having to go back to the laptop, in order to change a slide or tell a person sitting by the laptop to do that. Not cool!

This problem is usually solved by devices, called remote clickers or wireless presenters, which consist of a handheld controller with buttons that sends signals to a USB dongle plugged in the computer. After looking around to buy one, I could not find any decent option costing less than 10$. So why not make one?

Simple, easy and cheap wireless presenter – [Link]

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino

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by analysir.com:

We are often asked on discussion boards, about conflicts between IRremote or IRLib and other Arduino Libraries. In this post, we present a sketch for ‘Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino’. This is the first part in a 3 part series of posts. Part 1 shows how to generate the simple Infrared carrier frequency on Arduino, using any available IO pin and without conflicting with other libraries. Part 2 will show how to send a RAW infrared signal using this approach and Part 3 will show how to send a common NEC signal from the binary or HEX value.

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino – [Link]

VL6180X – Proximity sensor, gesture and ambient light sensing (ALS) module

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VL6180X

The VL6180X is the latest product based on ST’s patented FlightSenseTMtechnology. This is a ground-breaking technology allowing absolute distance to be measured independent of target reflectance. Instead of estimating the distance by measuring the amount of light reflected back from the object (which is significantly influenced by color and surface), the VL6180X precisely measures the time the light takes to travel to the nearest object and reflect back to the sensor (Time-of-Flight).

Combining an IR emitter, a range sensor and an ambient light sensor in a three-in-one ready-to-use reflowable package, the VL6180X is easy to integrate and saves the end-product maker long and costly optical and mechanical design optimizations.

VL6180X – Proximity sensor, gesture and ambient light sensing (ALS) module – [Link]

Wireless IR Headphone Transmitter

HEF4046BT

Infrared headphones can be used for listening to music or television cordlessly. The headphones utilize a transmitter that connects with audio cables to the audio source, such as a home entertainment center. The transmitter utilizes light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to direct a focused beam of invisible pulsating light towards a receiver built into the headphone set. The pulsations act as ON/OFF signals that are translated digitally by the receiver into audible sound waves. Most infrared headphones have an effective range of about 30 feet (~10 meters) or less, and require a clear line of sight between transmitter and receiver.

Sound comes out of the stereo system through audio cables and into an infrared transmitter. The transmitter turns the sound into a series of pulses. The pulses work like bits in a computer, digitally capturing the sound information. These pulses are then sent to an infrared LED.

For the transmitter side, an audio input from PL1 frequency modulates the VCO section of a HEF4046BT PLL chip. The VCO output drives Q1, a switching transistor. Q1 drives two IR LEDs. The signal produced is around 100 kHz, FM carrier VCO sensitivity is around 7.5 kHz/V.

Wireless IR Headphone Transmitter – [Link]

Wireless IR Headphone Receiver

HEF4046BP

Infrared headphones can be used for listening to music or television cordlessly. The headphones utilize a transmitter that connects with audio cables to the audio source, such as a home entertainment center. The transmitter utilizes light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to direct a focused beam of invisible pulsating light towards a receiver built into the headphone set. The pulsations act as ON/OFF signals that are translated digitally by the receiver into audible sound waves. Most infrared headphones have an effective range of about 30 feet (~10 meters) or less, and require a clear line of sight between transmitter and receiver.

The headphones pick up the light with a receiver and turn it back into sound. The receiver has an infrared CDS cell, which produces a pulse of electricity every time infrared light lands on it. The cell is designed to pick up the particular frequency of light produced by the transmitter, so it is not disturbed or thrown off by other light. A small computer inside of the receiver takes these pulses of electricity and turns them into an audio signal. This audio signal is then amplified and sent to the headphones themselves, which play the sound.

For the receiver side, a photodiode D1 feeds high gain IR remote control preamp IC, a CA3237E. U2 is a PLL FM detector tuned to around 100 kHz. The detector output is amplified by U3 and it can drive a speaker or a set of headphones.

Wireless IR Headphone Receiver – [Link]

Do-it-yourself PIN-diode counter

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by opengeiger.de:

The most legendary PIN-diode which is also used as a nuclear radiation detector is the BPW34. It is available from several semiconductor manufacturers in different variants and was originally designed for visible and invisible wavelength up to the IR wavelength region. Since such a diode is sensitive to light the use as a nuclear radiation detector requires proper shielded against light. The cost of a BW34 diode is generally below 1 Euro.

Do-it-yourself PIN-diode counter – [Link]

Antilog converter linearizes carbon dioxide sensor

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DI5470f1

by Jordan Dimitrov @ edn.com:

While most carbon dioxide sensors use IR technology, electrochemical sensors are a serious competitor because of their high sensitivity, wide measurement range, and low price. As a rule, electrochemical sensors connect to a microcontroller through a buffer amplifier with an extremely low bias current (<1pA). The micro is needed to linearize the logarithmic response of the sensor. A good example of this approach is the SEN-000007 module from Sandbox Electronics, which uses an MG-811 CO2 sensor from Hanwei Electronics. Reference 1 reveals the circuits and the code, but does not specify accuracy.

Antilog converter linearizes carbon dioxide sensor – [Link]

Simple pulse oximetry for wearable monitor

DI5455f2

by Martin Jagelka , Martin Daricek & Martin Donoval :

Continuous monitoring of heart activity permits measurement of heart rate variability (HRV), a basic parameter of heart health and other diseases.

This Design Idea is a new design of pulse oximetry that excels in its simplicity and functionality. Due to its capabilities, it can be used as a standalone device, able to monitor heart rate and oxygen saturation.

The core of the system is composed of the ultra-bright red LED (KA-3528SURC), infrared LED (VSMB3940X01-GS08), and a photodiode (VBP104SR) sensitive to both wavelengths of light at the same level.

Simple pulse oximetry for wearable monitor – [Link]

Candle with remote control and Arduino Pro Mini

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by Jose Daniel Herrera:

Here I present another project based on a addressable LEDs strip, based on WS2812b leds.

It consists of an ‘electronic’ candle, which lets you select set colors, adjust the intensity, and have different effects like rainbow, fade and fire. The project arose from the purchase of an IKEA lantern model BORBY … the idea was to replace a candle of considerable size, for something more … modern.

Candle with remote control and Arduino Pro Mini – [Link]