Tag Archives: IR



4 Channel Infrared (IR) Remote is a simple project using the popular  HT12A and HT12D encoder / decoder chips from Holtek.


  • Supply – Transmitter: 2.4 ~ 5 VDC, 5 V @ 20 mA & Receiver: 5 ~ 6 VDC, 5 V @ 50 mA
  •  Output – 4 Latched/Momentary TTL compatible outputs
  •  Crystal based oscillator for reliability of operation
  •  DIP switch selectable 8 bit address code
  •  LED output to indicate reception
  •  ON/OFF slide switch in the transmitter
  •  Power-On LED indicator in the Receiver / Transmitter
  •  High noise immunity
  •  Berg connector for interfacing of the board
  •  Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  •  PCB dimensions – Transmitter: 61 mm x 47 mm & Receiver: 46 mm x 46 mm


DIY Infrared Remote Controls


by Jason Poel Smith @ makezine.com:

Halloween is the perfect opportunity to create fun special effects. When you want to be able to control props and effects remotely, one good option is to use an infrared remote control. In this project, I’ll show you some simple remote controlled effects that you can set up in your haunted house this year.

DIY Infrared Remote Controls – [Link]

Simple Infrared Barrier


by Maurizio @ dev.emcelettronica.com:

Although a remote control is not so difficult to design and build, there is an even simpler option: the IR barrier. This consists of a constant IR signal permanently going from an emitter to a receiver, both of them being in two different places (a few meters apart). When an obstacle comes in between the emitter and the receiver, the IR signal is blocked and the receiver senses that it is missing, flagging the event in an appropriate manner (figure 1).

The principle of operation is simple enough, and with most components taken off the shelf, it is easy to design the schematic. The IR element in the emitter is a simple IR LED. This behaves absolutely like any other LED, with the sole exception that it emits light in the infrared spectrum. The emitted light is thus invisible to human eye, but it is meant to excite the infrared receiving element on the other side of the barrier. One important element of this LED is the wavelength of the emitted light, of which we already know that is in the infrared spectrum.

Simple Infrared Barrier – [Link]

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino, Part 3


The crew from AnalysIR has written up an article on Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino. If you missed part 1 and part 2, be sure to check it out.:

In Part 1 of this series, we demonstrated how to send signals using soft or Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino. In our Part 2 post we looked at sending RAW IR signals – specifically a RAW NEC signal and a longer RAW Mitsubishi Air Conditioner signal using soft PWM. We have since improved the PWM method shown in Part 1 & Part 2 to provide better performance and improve portability. In this Part 3, we will take the signals from Part 2 and show how to send them using their binary (or Hex) representation, which can save lots of SRAM in many projects, particularly when dealing with longer AC signals.

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino, Part 3 – [Link]

Controlling servo motor using IR remote control

by mohamed soliman @ instructables.com:

If you are looking for comfort and controlling your electronic devices remotely, you will find your need in this instructable.

In this instructable we will learn how to control a servo motor with remote control, this will give you a general concept on how to control remotely. You should know that the remote control sends Infrared(IR) signals, so we will learn how to receive and read these signals using Arduino.

Controlling servo motor using IR remote control – [Link]

IR remote tester


Who never had the need to test a TV or DVD remote?

I have several times. My favorite technique was to take my mobile phone and with the camera pointed at the infrared emitter look for a flashing little purple light. The mobile phone technique is an way for testing the remote but still i decided to make a small circuit just to test the remotes.

IR remote tester – [Link]

Simple, easy and cheap wireless presenter


by Dimitris Platis @ instructables.com:

During presentations, I avoid being stationary and generally like to walk around in order to increase the interaction between me and the audience. However, I am constantly being faced with the burden of having to go back to the laptop, in order to change a slide or tell a person sitting by the laptop to do that. Not cool!

This problem is usually solved by devices, called remote clickers or wireless presenters, which consist of a handheld controller with buttons that sends signals to a USB dongle plugged in the computer. After looking around to buy one, I could not find any decent option costing less than 10$. So why not make one?

Simple, easy and cheap wireless presenter – [Link]

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino


by analysir.com:

We are often asked on discussion boards, about conflicts between IRremote or IRLib and other Arduino Libraries. In this post, we present a sketch for ‘Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino’. This is the first part in a 3 part series of posts. Part 1 shows how to generate the simple Infrared carrier frequency on Arduino, using any available IO pin and without conflicting with other libraries. Part 2 will show how to send a RAW infrared signal using this approach and Part 3 will show how to send a common NEC signal from the binary or HEX value.

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino – [Link]

VL6180X – Proximity sensor, gesture and ambient light sensing (ALS) module


The VL6180X is the latest product based on ST’s patented FlightSenseTMtechnology. This is a ground-breaking technology allowing absolute distance to be measured independent of target reflectance. Instead of estimating the distance by measuring the amount of light reflected back from the object (which is significantly influenced by color and surface), the VL6180X precisely measures the time the light takes to travel to the nearest object and reflect back to the sensor (Time-of-Flight).

Combining an IR emitter, a range sensor and an ambient light sensor in a three-in-one ready-to-use reflowable package, the VL6180X is easy to integrate and saves the end-product maker long and costly optical and mechanical design optimizations.

VL6180X – Proximity sensor, gesture and ambient light sensing (ALS) module – [Link]

Wireless IR Headphone Transmitter


Infrared headphones can be used for listening to music or television cordlessly. The headphones utilize a transmitter that connects with audio cables to the audio source, such as a home entertainment center. The transmitter utilizes light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to direct a focused beam of invisible pulsating light towards a receiver built into the headphone set. The pulsations act as ON/OFF signals that are translated digitally by the receiver into audible sound waves. Most infrared headphones have an effective range of about 30 feet (~10 meters) or less, and require a clear line of sight between transmitter and receiver.

Sound comes out of the stereo system through audio cables and into an infrared transmitter. The transmitter turns the sound into a series of pulses. The pulses work like bits in a computer, digitally capturing the sound information. These pulses are then sent to an infrared LED.

For the transmitter side, an audio input from PL1 frequency modulates the VCO section of a HEF4046BT PLL chip. The VCO output drives Q1, a switching transistor. Q1 drives two IR LEDs. The signal produced is around 100 kHz, FM carrier VCO sensitivity is around 7.5 kHz/V.

Wireless IR Headphone Transmitter – [Link]