Tag Archives: Laser

Epson develops compact atomic oscillator


Epson has revealed a new atomic oscillator to provide a better accuracy device for telecommunication networks. This new oscillator is using a special laser and IC that are developed by Epson.

Seiko Epson Corporation has developed a small, highly stable atomic oscillator, the AO6860LAN, for telecommunications networks and industrial applications. The development of the new oscillator will be presented on November 4, 2015, in Edinburgh, UK, at the upcoming ITSF 2015 (the International Telecom Sync Forum). Volume production is scheduled to begin in 2016.

The new product makes it possible for Epson’s customers to build smaller, more reliable telecommunications infrastructure and test and measurement systems that consume less power. Although Epson has provided atomic oscillators for communications infrastructure equipment in the past, the new product utilizes an original vertical cavity surface-emitting laser and special IC, both designed and manufactured by Epson.

Epson develops compact atomic oscillator – [Link]

Laser Data Transmission

Lasers have been one of the essential technologies used in industries. It is realized that light outperforms radio in terms of speed and density. It has been used for communications whether in scanning barcodes, reading CD’s and DVD’s. This design is a simple data transmitter that uses a DIP switch to support the transmission of data over a transmission medium. This switch withstands extreme shock, vibration, temperature and altitude.

The circuit works when bits are sent across the receiver using an amplified light where signal is received by a phototransistor. The voltage is converted to digital signal that will be read by the receiver. The one shot multivibrator on both ends used to send 8 clock pulses and will received at the receiving end. The first bit starts the clock and the second bit goes to Serial In/Parallel out IC. Pulse triggering occurs at a particular voltage level and is not directly related to the transition time of the input pulse. Once fired, the outputs are independent of further transitions of the input.

Laser data transmission has various applications that can send voice and video data. This can be made more portable so that users can easily bring the device whenever possible. The device can be easily constructed and integrated to other electronic devices and may be used as a fundamental circuit for electronic finder/trackers.

Laser Data Transmission – [Link]

Laser Diode Driver


Laser Diode Driver project will help you safely drive (constant current) a 3 mW visible Laser Diode for your application.

  • Input supply – 2.5 to 6 VDC
  • Onboard preset to adjust the current flow to the Laser Diode
  • Power-On LED indicator
  • Header connector for easy input supply and LASER DIODE module connection
  • Laser diode is not included
  • Circuit is designed around Sanyo DL3148-025 LASER DIODE
  • PCB dimensions 37 mm x 42 mm

Laser Diode Driver – [Link]

DIY pocket laser engraver


Photon printer, a 3D printable laser engraver build using DVD drives by Isolt:

This is an entry for the Light It Up contest on the grounds that a laser diode is a specialised form on light emitting diode.
The Photon Printer started out as a quick weekend project then quickly escalated when I saw that there was room for improvement in the current designs. The design turned out to be quite fun and I really enjoyed seeing it work at the end.

DIY pocket laser engraver – [Link]

Affordable Opensource Arduino Laser Engraver for Everbody


The ZelosLaser Engraver is affordable, with a compact design and the perfect entry for the Daily Hobbyist.

What are the characteristics of the ZelosLaser Engraver?

  • Work area *Normal* 300mm x 200mm
  • Housing dimensions Normal 440mm x 350mm x 220mm
  • Work area *BIG MAMA* 660mm x 650mm
  • Housing dimensions *BIG MAMA* 800mm x 800mm x 220mm

Affordable Opensource Arduino Laser Engraver for Everbody – [Link]

3dpBurner – A 3D printed laser cutter/engraver


by 3dpburner.blogspot.com.es:

It is created with the same concept as RepRap, using 3D printed parts and some easy to find “vitamins” (non printed hardware).

I tried to make it as cheap as possible, by using cheap electronics and a “low power” laser (a laser diode).
The X/Y working area is fully customisable and the max working object height is up to 50-60mm.

The cutter/engraver basically uses the 3D printed parts, M8 and M3 size hardware (rods, nuts,washers and bolts), some small bearings and GT2 pulleys and belts. I got most of the parts from my “old” RepRap printer.

The X/Y working area is fully customsable by changing the length of the 8mm rods.

The electronics uses an Arduino UNO with a cheap CNC shield and two Pololu based stepper drivers to drive two NEMA17 stepper motors.

3dpBurner – A 3D printed laser cutter/engraver – [Link]

Arduino Laser Trip Wire


by ronnietucker @ instructables.com:

So, first thing I did was to get the LCD and keypad working together.

For this I pretended that it was some sort of arm/disarm (or entry/exit) thing.

My code for this part is at: http://pastebin.com/YndLneqm.

Getting the LCD wired up was tricky as most wiring diagrams for it don’t show the last two pins wired up and these are required for the back light. Check my snazzy Fritzing wiring diagram to see how I wired up my LCD screen, pot (for adjusting brightness) and keypad. The pins for them all are also mentioned in my code.

Arduino Laser Trip Wire – [Link]

First germanium-tin semiconductor laser directly compatible with silicon chips


by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

Swiss scientists have created the first semiconductor laser consisting solely of elements of main group IV (the carbon group) on the periodic table. Simply, this means that the new device is directly compatible with other elements in that group – such as silicon, carbon, and lead – and so can be directly incorporated in a silicon chip as it is manufactured. This presents new possibilities for transmitting data around computer chips using light, which could result in potential transfer speeds exponentially faster than possible with copper wire and using only a fraction of the energy of today’s integrated circuits.

First germanium-tin semiconductor laser directly compatible with silicon chips – [Link]

Make high-quality double-sided PCBs – at home


Andrew Sarangan @ edn.com:

Why make your own printed circuit boards when you can get them commercially made for low cost? For one, it can take one to four weeks to receive the boards. For prototyping, this can be a major hurdle. Each design iteration will then take a month or more, and a project may need many months to get done. The DIYer can fab the board and assemble everything in one evening. That advantage is really hard to beat.

Besides time, there are other reasons to make your own board. Commercial services charge by board size, not complexity. Larger boards will cost more even if they are completely blank. I once had to make an oversized PCB because the parts had to be spaced far apart. It was a very sparse board, but getting it made from even the cheapest commercial source would have been expensive.

Make high-quality double-sided PCBs – at home – [Link]