Tag Archives: LCD

One wire controls LCD module

Rex Niven @  edn.com has a design idea on how to drive a character LCD using only one wire.

This hardware interface Design Idea reduces the connection to just one wire, allowing a basic microcontroller with limited I/O to drive a large display, either directly, through a standard interface, or even an opto-isolator.

One wire controls LCD module – [Link]

Design HMI For Your Projects Easily With Nextion

Nextion display by ITead allows users to design their own interfaces all by themselves, even if they don’t have any coding background knowledge and can go with different platforms. This tool is the best solution to replace traditional TFT LCD and LED Nixie tube. Customers can use the software – Nextion Editor to design interfaces.

With the new capacitive 7-inch Nextion, you can build your own HMI with minimal design effort since all of the data and control signals are provided by the device to interface directly to the display. This offers enormous advantage to the designer in development time and cost saving and takes away all of the burden of low level design.

Nextion will help you quickly design visually in hours not weeks, turn long coding work into simple drag and drop operation, at a reasonable cost. What you only need, is interface a serial port to Nextion disply hardware. Check this demo to see how quickly and easily an application can be designed by dragging and dropping objections to the virtual screen on a WYSIWYG design IDE – Nextion Editor.

This is the second version of Nextion, where you can find a capacitive multi-touch display and a good looking bezel along with additional features in the software IDE. Below are the specifications of new Nextion:

Nextion is now live on a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo and still has 15 days to go. You can pre-order Nextion RTP now for $55. More details can be found at the official website.

Raspberry Pi I2C LCD Set Up and Programming

In this video Circuit Basics show us how to use I2C to connect an LCD to the Raspberry Pi. After showing you how to connect the LCD to the Pi with a PCF8574 (http://www.circuitbasics.com/pj6v), they show you how to program it. First I’ll cover the basic stuff like printing text to the screen, clearing the screen, blinking text, and positioning text. Then I’ll go into more advanced stuff like scrolling text, printing data from a sensor, turning on and off the cursor, and printing custom characters.

Raspberry Pi I2C LCD Set Up and Programming [Link]

Weather Station with a BME280 sensor and an LCD screen with Arduino Mega

In this Arduino Project video educ8s.tv is going to build a simple weather station using a BME280 sensor and an LCD shield.

Hello guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. Today we are going to take a first look at the new BME280 sensor, a new very interesting sensor. We are going to build a simple but very accurate weather station project. I have built a similar project 2 years ago, using different sensors. Now that we have a new sensor available which makes things easier, it’s time to update the project. As you can see, on the LCD display we can see the temperature, the humidity and the barometric pressure. The readings are updated every two seconds. This is a very easy project to build so it is ideal for beginners! Let’s build it!

Weather Station with a BME280 sensor and an LCD screen with Arduino Mega [Link]

How to Set Up and Program an LCD Display on an Arduino

circuitbasics.com has a tutorial on how to setup an LCD with Arduino.

In this tutorial, I’ll explain how to set up an LCD display on an Arduino, and show you all the functions available to program it (with examples). The display I’m using here is a 16×2 LCD display that I bought for under $10 on Amazon. LCDs are really useful in projects that output data, and they can make your project a lot more interesting and interactive.

How to Set Up and Program an LCD Display on an Arduino – [Link]

How to Setup an LCD Touchscreen on the Raspberry Pi

circuitbasics.com has a tutorial on how to setup a LCD screen for Raspberry Pi.

In this tutorial, I’ll walk you through the process of installing an LCD touchscreen on the Raspberry Pi, step by step. Many LCD touchscreens for the Raspberry Pi include an image file that you can write to your SD card and get up and running pretty quickly.

How to Setup an LCD Touchscreen on the Raspberry Pi – [Link]

Arduino Tutorial: Menu on a Nokia 5110 LCD Display Tutorial

In this easy Arduino Tutorial educ8s.tv is going to show us how to create a Menu on a Nokia 5110 LCD display.

This is the project we are going to build. In the display a simple menu appears, and with the help of three buttons I can navigate up, or down and select a menu item. Let’s select the first option. As you can see a new a UI screen is displayed and by pressing the up and down buttons we can change the contrast of the display. If we press the middle button again, we go back to the main UI screen. If we now select the second menu item and press the middle button we can turn the backlight of the display on or off. Lastly if we navigate to the last menu item we can reset the settings for the display to the default values. Of course this is just a demonstration project, you can modify it to build your own more complex menus if you wish. Let’s now see how to build this project.

Arduino Tutorial: Menu on a Nokia 5110 LCD Display Tutorial [Link]

DIY Breathalyzer Using Arduino UNO

Today I am going to discuss how to make a very simple DIY Breathalyzer using Arduino UNO and few external components. Ana Carolina designed this project as an instructable in instructables.com. This is a low-cost project and a useful one too. If you have no idea about what breathalyzer is, let me explain briefly: A breathalyzer is a device for estimating blood alcohol content (BAC) from a breath sample. Check the link given for more information.

Arduino Based Breathalyzer
Arduino Based Breathalyzer

Requirements:

  • Arduino Uno
  • MQ-3 Alcohol Sensor
  • 128×64 LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)
  • 7 × 330 Ohm Resistor
  • 7 × LEDs (1 Red, 2 Yellow, 3 Green and one other color)
  • Jumpers Wires
  • Breadboard
  • Soldering Iron (optional)
  • Solder Wire (optional)

Details:

This project is very simple. Here we are using an array of six LEDs and a 128×64 LCD to display the alcohol level. The presence of alcohol is sensed by an MQ-3 alcohol sensor and then analyzed by an Arduino board. We are using Arduino UNO in this project, but any model can do the job.

Three Green LEDs represent that alcohol level is OK and within the safe limit. Two Yellow LEDs are used to describe that safe limit is going to be reached, and you know it well why the Red LED is there. In fact, those LEDs are used just to give you a quick idea. If you want to know the exact value, the display is there for you.

You can tweak the program and re-calibrate the breathalyzer. But you must remember that breathalyzer doesn’t precisely measure your blood alcohol content, rather it estimates a value from the amount of alcohol in your breath.

Circuit:

Breathalyzer Circuit On Breadboard
Breathalyzer Circuit On Breadboard

You can make the circuit also on PCB or Veroboard. But for the prototyping purpose, the breadboard is the best choice. You can see how straight forward the connections are.

The Code:

Some part of the original code was in Portuguese. So I have translated it into English. Also, the original code shared by the author in instrucatbles.com is a buggy one. So, I recommend you to use my bug-free code instead of the original one.

Please note that you have to download and add the u8glib library in Arduino IDE beforehand. It is very important. You can either download the u8glib v1.14 library for Arduino directly or go to the site and choose what to download.

Follow the given steps to add a .zip library in your sketch: Open IDE and click on Sketch  Include Library  Add .zip Library. Now select the downloaded .zip library file. You needn’t unzip it.

When everything is done, verify and upload the code to Arduino.

Test It:

I must not recommend you to drink alcohol just for testing the breathalyzer. Rather get a towel and spray alcohol on it. Now hold the towel in front of the sensor. Move it back and forth to observe the change in reading. It may take a while for the breathalyzer to stabilize.

Consider watching the video for a better understanding:

RELATED POSTS

How to Set Up and Program an LCD Display on an Arduino

circuitbasics.com writes:

In this tutorial, I’ll explain how to set up an LCD display on an Arduino, and show you all the functions available to program it (with examples). The display I’m using here is a 16×2 LCD display that I bought for under $10 on Amazon. LCDs are really useful in projects that output data, and they can make your project a lot more interesting and interactive.

How to Set Up and Program an LCD Display on an Arduino – [Link]

1K LCD Tinyfont

A tiny pixel font rendered to an LCD display, in under 1K program space. by Zach:

For the Hackaday 1k challenge, I’m attempting to pack a small pixel-based font and rendering to LCD in under 1K.

The project has already been developed in C, but the file size was much larger. This is rewrite in assembly.

Developed on an Atmega328p using a display from a Nokia 5110 on a Sparkfun dev board.

1K LCD Tinyfont – [Link]