Tag Archives: LCD

chipKIT Tutorial: Using Nokia 5110 LCD

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Raj @ embedded-lab.com has posted another great tutorial on how to interface a Nokia 5110 LCD to chipKIT board.

Today, we will see how to connect a NOKIA 5110 graphical LCD (used in Nokia 5110 cell phones), which is a 84×48 pixel monochrome display of about 1.5″ diagonal in size. The display can be used for graphics, text, and bitmaps.

chipKIT Tutorial: Using Nokia 5110 LCD – [Link]

Better 3D graphics on the Arduino – ILI9341 LCD

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M Rule @ crawlingrobotfortress.blogspot.com discuss about ways to optimize 3D rendering on ILI9341 LCD and Arduino:

Both optimizing ILI9341 LCD drivers and rendering basic wireframe meshes have been done before. XarkLabs provides an optimized fork of Adafruit’s library. Youtube user electrodacus has also implementd an optimize driver for the ILI9341 communicating over SPI.

Better 3D graphics on the Arduino – ILI9341 LCD – [Link]

DIY I2C LCD Display

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sspence @ instructables.com shows how to interface a character LCD using I2C and only two IO pins.

The typical parallel LCD used with an Arduino (16×2 or 20×4) has 16 pins. Only 6 I/O pins are required on the Arduino, but what if you could get that down to two I/O pins, and still have those pins available for other devices?

The I2C interface is on pins A4 and A5 of the Arduino. These are addressable, and are therefore shareable with other I2C devices that have different addresses.

DIY I2C LCD Display – [Link]

Arduino Tutorial: Using the Soil Moisture Sensor along with a Nokia 5110 LCD display

Using the soil moisture sensor with an Arduino can’t be easier. Adding a Nokia 5110 LCD display makes things more professional since we can visually check the moisture levels of the soil.

The sensor can measure the levels of moisture in the soil. So it can be extremely useful if you want to monitor the soil moisture of your plants or automate the watering procedure. Let’s see the project we are going to build today. I have one cup in front of me with dry soil. If I place the sensor in the cup we can read a low soil moisture value at the Nokia 5110 display. If I pour some water in the cup you can clearly see that the moisture levels rise. The project is working fine and we can visually check the moisture levels of the soil. Of course this is just a demonstration of the sensor, I am going to build more useful projects in the future with this sensor. Let’s now see how to build this simple project.

Arduino Tutorial: Using the Soil Moisture Sensor along with a Nokia 5110 LCD display – [Link]

LCD clock with 4″ display

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mcs.uwsuper.edu has build a big LCD clock based on MSP430 mcu and DS3231 RTC clock chip. They write:

The clock is built on a 4″ (101 mm) LCD displays OD-103 manufactured by Orient Display. The LCD provides high contrast of digits and easy reading from a large distance. The unit runs on batteries and can also be powered from mains. Here is how it looks under direct sun.

The time keeping is provided by DS3231 RTC chip with an integrated high accuracy (± 5ppm) MEMS crystal. This makes PCB design very simple, as one does not need to take care on special traces design around the crystal.

LCD clock with 4″ display – [Link]

Toothbrushing Instructor

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jckelley @ instructables.com has build a tooth brushing help tool using LinkIT ONE Board and an LCD screen:

Kids just aren’t huge fans of brushing their teeth. Not only are they not huge fans, they also are pretty bad at it. Teaching a young kid to brush their teeth is really hard. I created a little contraption that not only times them to make sure they brush for an entire two minutes, but also tells them what part of their mouth they should be brushing! Now kids can’t claim they didn’t know what to do, since the Toothbrush Instructor told them!

Toothbrushing Instructor – [Link]

Arduino Digital Capacitance Meter

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by braulio777 @ instructables.com

This project lets you measure capacitors in an alone range of measure from 0.000pF to 1000uF. That is, a 16×2 LCD Display will be displaying a sole scale from 0.000pF to 1000uF whose main components will be an Arduino Uno and a 16X2 LCD Display.

Arduino Digital Capacitance Meter – [Link]

Building a SmartWatch

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Benjamin Blundell has been working on his DIY smart-watch:

I have an issue with smart-watches. Watches in general fall into one of two categories: a tool to tell the time, or a fashion statement. Increasingly, I believe the latter category is larger than the first. With the advent of the iWatch, Pebble and the like, fashion and making a statement has moved into technology. It’s not quite a new thing but nevertheless, it’s something I’m not too fond of. My solution? Make your own smartwatch.
There is a precedent for this. Steve Wozniack sports a pretty fly nixie tube watch which he made himself. It’s pretty cool, but also a statement of sorts too. I’ve been meaning to up my game with electronics anyway, so I’ve been working on a few initial prototypes.

Building a SmartWatch – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

ESP8266-based touchscreen clock and light controller with WiFi

Spiros Papadimitriou build a nice clock based on ESP8266 Wifi and 2.4″ LCD module. He writes:

This was a week-long hack, to build a simple touchscreen clock, with the following features:

Graphical UI with touch (no buttons)
Clock synchronization over NTP
Ability to control WiFi-connected LED lamps
Web-based configuration UI

This project was partly inspired by the Chumby (remember that?) and by our old X10 light controller (remember those!?). Current iteration’s cost is probably comparable to a used Chumby (which also has a lot more features), but it’s more fun this way. 🙂 However, the cost could be taken down to ~$10.

ESP8266-based touchscreen clock and light controller with WiFi – [Link]

Wrist Mount Digital Altimeter

This project is a simple wrist mount digital altimeter which is a device used to determine altitude. This design uses atmospheric pressure to calculate the altitude of its location. The lower the atmospheric pressure, the higher the altitude. The project is comprised of a microcontroller (MCU), an 84×84 pixel graphic LCD and a barometric pressure sensor.

The barometric pressure sensor used in the design is the MS560702BA03-50 from TE Connectivity Measurement Specialties. It consists of a piezo-resistive sensor and a sensor interface IC. Its main function is to convert the uncompensated analogue output voltage from the piezo-resistive pressure sensor to a 24-bit digital value, as well as providing a 24-bit digital value for the temperature of the sensor. It is optimized for altimeters and variometers with an altitude resolution of 20cm. The MS560702BA03-50 measures the atmospheric pressure on its location then converts it to a 24-bit value through its internal ADC. The sensor reading is then transmitted to the MCU through SPI. Then the MCU calculates the altitude by using the pressure reading. The calibration of an altimeter follows the equation z = cT log (Po /P), where c is a constant, T is the absolute temperature, P is the pressure at altitude z, and Po is the pressure at sea level. The calculated altitude is then displayed through an 84×84 pixel graphic LCD which is mostly found on old phones. The circuit is powered through a 3.3V battery.

The altimeter is used to aid navigation and is mostly used in skydiving, mountaineering and hiking applications. It is usually hand-held or in wrist-mount form for the ease of use. Altimeters can also be found in aircrafts such as planes and helicopters and others that needs altitude indication.

Wrist Mount Digital Altimeter – [Link]