Tag Archives: LCD

Arduino Digital Capacitance Meter

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by braulio777 @ instructables.com

This project lets you measure capacitors in an alone range of measure from 0.000pF to 1000uF. That is, a 16×2 LCD Display will be displaying a sole scale from 0.000pF to 1000uF whose main components will be an Arduino Uno and a 16X2 LCD Display.

Arduino Digital Capacitance Meter – [Link]

Building a SmartWatch

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Benjamin Blundell has been working on his DIY smart-watch:

I have an issue with smart-watches. Watches in general fall into one of two categories: a tool to tell the time, or a fashion statement. Increasingly, I believe the latter category is larger than the first. With the advent of the iWatch, Pebble and the like, fashion and making a statement has moved into technology. It’s not quite a new thing but nevertheless, it’s something I’m not too fond of. My solution? Make your own smartwatch.
There is a precedent for this. Steve Wozniack sports a pretty fly nixie tube watch which he made himself. It’s pretty cool, but also a statement of sorts too. I’ve been meaning to up my game with electronics anyway, so I’ve been working on a few initial prototypes.

Building a SmartWatch – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

ESP8266-based touchscreen clock and light controller with WiFi

Spiros Papadimitriou build a nice clock based on ESP8266 Wifi and 2.4″ LCD module. He writes:

This was a week-long hack, to build a simple touchscreen clock, with the following features:

Graphical UI with touch (no buttons)
Clock synchronization over NTP
Ability to control WiFi-connected LED lamps
Web-based configuration UI

This project was partly inspired by the Chumby (remember that?) and by our old X10 light controller (remember those!?). Current iteration’s cost is probably comparable to a used Chumby (which also has a lot more features), but it’s more fun this way. 🙂 However, the cost could be taken down to ~$10.

ESP8266-based touchscreen clock and light controller with WiFi – [Link]

Wrist Mount Digital Altimeter

This project is a simple wrist mount digital altimeter which is a device used to determine altitude. This design uses atmospheric pressure to calculate the altitude of its location. The lower the atmospheric pressure, the higher the altitude. The project is comprised of a microcontroller (MCU), an 84×84 pixel graphic LCD and a barometric pressure sensor.

The barometric pressure sensor used in the design is the MS560702BA03-50 from TE Connectivity Measurement Specialties. It consists of a piezo-resistive sensor and a sensor interface IC. Its main function is to convert the uncompensated analogue output voltage from the piezo-resistive pressure sensor to a 24-bit digital value, as well as providing a 24-bit digital value for the temperature of the sensor. It is optimized for altimeters and variometers with an altitude resolution of 20cm. The MS560702BA03-50 measures the atmospheric pressure on its location then converts it to a 24-bit value through its internal ADC. The sensor reading is then transmitted to the MCU through SPI. Then the MCU calculates the altitude by using the pressure reading. The calibration of an altimeter follows the equation z = cT log (Po /P), where c is a constant, T is the absolute temperature, P is the pressure at altitude z, and Po is the pressure at sea level. The calculated altitude is then displayed through an 84×84 pixel graphic LCD which is mostly found on old phones. The circuit is powered through a 3.3V battery.

The altimeter is used to aid navigation and is mostly used in skydiving, mountaineering and hiking applications. It is usually hand-held or in wrist-mount form for the ease of use. Altimeters can also be found in aircrafts such as planes and helicopters and others that needs altitude indication.

Wrist Mount Digital Altimeter – [Link]

DIY milliohmmeter

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by hwmakers.eu:

This is an example of a simple and cheap milliohmmeter that can be made by every maker. The core of the circuit are a current source (LT3092) and a current sense (INA225): a costant current flows through the milliohm resistor under test and the voltage at the current sense output gives the value of the resistor (V=R*I).

The milliohmmeter can be used as a stand alone instrument by adding a MCU with at least 10 bit ADC and a LCD display or it can be used togheter with a DMM.

DIY milliohmmeter – [Link]

Arduino Project: Flappy Bird game Clone with a 1.8″ color TFT display (ST7735)

Educ8s.com @ youtube.com:

Playing the Flappy Bird game on Arduino is extremely easy. With a cheap Arduino Uno and a very cheap 1.8″ color TFT display (ST7735) you can enjoy the classic game, the best part? It is going to be a DIY project. Actually you can build your own gaming console using Arduino, like the popular Gamebuino.

The code of the project is by Themistocles Benetatos who shares the code with us. In his blog he describes how he managed to achieve that result. Don’t miss it: http://www.mrt-prodz.com/blog/view/20…

All you have to do is to buy the following parts, if you don’t own them already. The cost is around 10$:

Arduino Project: Flappy Bird game Clone with a 1.8″ color TFT display (ST7735) – [Link]

Touchscreen-controlled Arduino Geiger Counter

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by Toumal @ github.com:

A touchscreen-controlled Geiger Counter for Arduino. Requires a Radiation Watch Pocket Geiger sensor, a ITDB02 Display from SainSmart and an Arduino Mega.

Software needs my fork of the RadiationWatch library, the ITDB02 library as well as the UTouch library

Touchscreen-controlled Arduino Geiger Counter – [Link]

An Edison-Based Password Keeper

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by DanielGilbert @ instructables.com:

With this instructable, I try to solve a problem everyone has: Passwords. Accounts. Logins. All the stuff you need to get into your favourite social media site, shopping site, blog or forum (they still exist, huh?). Now, there are several ways to control your accounts:

Use always the same credentials: No. Never ever do that. Seriously. If your account gets hacked on one site, chance is that the hacker(s) will try the credentials on other, popular sites also. Don’t underestimate them. They are smart. Criminals, but smart.
Use a software on every device: You can do that. And if you are lucky, this software will run forever on this device. But maybe, at some point, you will get rid of the devices. Uh-oh…
Write them down: Yepp. You can do that. But – everyone who finds your book will be able to read your passwords. That wouldn’t be that great, right?

To solve all of this, I created a device called “The PinTin Nano”. It has it’s name from the fact that it’s a) pretty small and b) fits in a mint tin. I love that, because that makes the device easy to carry around.

An Edison-Based Password Keeper – [Link]

Experiments with 2.4″ TFT

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Rui Cabral tipped us with his latest project. He writes:

Lately I’ve been testing a small 2.4″ TFT display PBC ILI9341 with touch and bought on ebay for less than 8euros!

This graphic display is an excellent solution for both small projects and for more advanced projects since it includes SD card connector to access stored images.

This display has a resolution of 240×320 RGB.

Experiments with 2.4″ TFT – [Link]

Arduino Thermometer With DS18B20

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by KonstantinDimitrov @ instructables.com

Hello, everyone !!! Today I’m going to show you how to make Arduino thermometer with DS18B20 digital temperature sensor, builded on breadboard and connected together with jumpers.

Info about the sensor – DS18B20 is 1-Wire digital temperature sensor from Maxim IC. Reports degrees C with 9 to 12-bit precision, -55C to 125C (+/-0.5C). Each sensor has a unique 64-Bit Serial number etched into it – allows for a huge number of sensors to be used on one data bus.

Arduino Thermometer With DS18B20 – [Link]