Tag Archives: Led

Raspberry Pi tutorial: Use SSH to in order to remote control your Raspberry Pi

SSH protocol can be very useful if we want to remote control our Raspberry Pi. I am using a Raspberry Pi A+ board in this video but you can use any Raspberry Pi board you like.

So far, when we wanted to use our Raspberry Pi, we were using a keyboard, a mouse and a monitor via the HDMI port, or a touch screen like this one. The second method is easier and portable. I have prepared a detailed tutorial on that touch screen display a few weeks ago, you can check it out. But if we want an even easier solution, we can use our desktop computer, or laptop, or even our cell phone to remotely control the Raspberry Pi. Check this out, I am running a terminal on my Android cell phone and I can execute commands on my Raspberry Pi. I will now run a simple program I wrote in order to light up this LED. Cool, isn’t it? But very useful as well! Let’s see how we can achieve that!

Raspberry Pi tutorial: Use SSH to in order to remote control your Raspberry Pi – [Link]

Warning LED Flash Light


LED Flasher is a simple project producing a flashing effect of six LED’s.  This project can be used in all areas where you want to draw attention.  Hi-glow LED’s providing enough flashing light to attract your attention. Can be used as warning light.


  • Supply input 12 V @ 35 mA (6 to 15V Dc Possible)
  • Onboard preset to adjust flash rate
  • Terminal pins for connecting supply input
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 53 mm x 35 mm
  • CN1: Supply in 12V DC (6V-15V Supply Possible)
  • PR1 : Flash Frequency Adjust

Warning LED Flash Light – [Link]

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel


Ytai Ben-Tsvi @ ytai-mer.blogspot.com build a PIC based 3W LED Driver that is chainable. He writes:

LED Pixel: The Pixie is a color LED module, allowing an external controller to change its color and brightness dynamically.
Chainable: The module is designed so that you can chain many of them and control each one individually. If you know NeoPixels, this concept should be clear, but in case you don’t, imagine you want to build a project that requires 50 LEDs to be individually controlled. Naively, you would need to power each on of them individually, then connect each one of them individually to a controller. This would require tons of wiring, many pins on the controller, each one possibly driven by a specialized peripheral, such as UART or PWM. In short, this is not practical. With the Pixie, being chainable, you connect the first LED’s input pins to power and a single control pin (serial TX) on the controller. Then you connect the first LED’s output pins (power, ground, data) to the input of the second LED, and so on. Each Pixie in the chain consumes its own data, then relays the rest of the data down the chain, so the controller can control each Pixie individually, without being connected to each one.

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel – [Link]

Disco Lights with IC555


This is a simple 555 timer IC circuit that is able to power two strings of LEDs alternative.

Disco lights are mostly used in decoration made with colourful LEDs. For begginners, this is a compact circuit using a single chip IC. IC555 is connected here to form a multivibrator. The blinking speed can be easily adjusted by varying the preset 500kΩ. You can use any colour of LED.

Disco Lights with IC555 – [Link]



Digital Panel Meter performs digital processing on or conversion and display of voltages, currents, other analog signals, and pulse signals. This project is based on popular ICL 7107 IC, which is analog to digital converter and has been designed to drive 7 segment LED display. The ICL7107 is high performance, low power, 3, 1/3 digit A/D converter. Included are seven segment decoders, display drivers, a reference, and a clock. This DPM project may be used in a wide variety of configurations Full scale reading of +/- 199.9mV (200mV)


  • Supply 5V DC @ 80mA.
  • Range 0 to 199.9mV (200mV)
  • Low Current consumption
  • Low input leakage current because external reference
  • Single supply operation
  • On board Jumpers for range display
  • Auto Zero and auto polarity within IC
  • Supply Input CN2 5V DC
  • Test Voltage CN1 0-200mV
  • PR1 Preset for reading calibration.

Digital Panel Meter – Voltmeter – [Link]

How to use a Serial Voice Recognition Module


by codebender_cc @ instructables.com:

In this tutorial you will learn how to use a voice recognition – serial – module with the Arduino uno board. This module can store up to 15 voice commands. Those are divided into 3 groups, with 5 commands in each group.

First we should train the module with voice instructions group by group. After that, we should import one group before it could recognize the 5 voice instructions within that group.If we need to implement instructions in other groups, we should import the group first. Only one group can be active per time.

In this tutorial we will use an RGB LED and we will try to change the color of it with voice commands.

How to use a Serial Voice Recognition Module – [Link]

Wifi throwie : improved version


iotests.blogspot.fr build a throwie based on ESP8266 WiFi module and a mini drone battery, he writes:

A few months ago, Andreas presented a nice version of the “throwie” (a LED packed with a small battery that you can throw & see shining for hours) using an ESP8266 instead of a LED : a “wifi throwie”.

He could not make it work with button cell batteries (the ESP8266 draws too much current) so he ended using a 3.7 LIPO battery, which is quite bulky as you can see on the following post : http://hackaday.com/2015/05/03/esp8266-wifi-throwies/

What if you could use instead a cheap mini drone battery you can find for half a euro on eBay ?
Bingo !

Wifi throwie : improved version – [Link]

LED-based time-of-flight IC for object detection and distance measurement


by Lee Goldberg @ edn.com:

Although Intersil’s ISL29501 time-of-flight (ToF) signal processing IC doesn’t have anything to do with the lighting applications I normally cover, I felt compelled to bring it to your attention because it’s one of the most innovative LED applications I’ve seen this year. The device requires little more than an external emitter (LED or laser) and a photodiode to implement a complete object detection and distance measurement solution that provides precision long-range accuracy up to 2m in both dark and bright ambient light conditions.

LED-based time-of-flight IC for object detection and distance measurement – [Link]

LED Wave Display


by 17bhuey @ instructables.com:

In order to create this project, many physical materials are necessary, a lot of which will not be found lying around at home. In order to do this project, you should go out to computer stores or look online for these products. Keep in mind that you can upgrade to larger LED boards or faster arduinos, but that would require some modification of this tutorial as the coding, wiring, etc, changes with the addition of different products. Overall, this project is a fun way for you to practice your engineering, circuitry, and computer science skills while making a device that shows off your music taste in a new light.

LED Wave Display – [Link]