Tag Archives: Linux

New Allwinner V5 Linux based SBC comes with Detection Capability

Lindenis Tech. Ltd, a Chinese startup has released a new 130 x 85mm single board computer called Lindenis Allwinner V5 which runs on Linux and comes packed with a new quad-core cortex A7 1.5GHz processor which is built for 4k 30fps (Linux) cameras, a custom VPU, a dual ISP, and an AIE intelligent analytic acceleration engine handling motion detection, perimeter defense, video diagnosis, face detection, flow statistics and binocular depth maps.

Compared to other Allwinner H3 boards and other various NanoPi and Orange Pi models, the price is quite high and thinking of the modest features such as 1GB RAM, and a lack of standard wireless or eMMC, it seems the high price comes from its camera and vision analytics capability.

The AIE feature comes with two vision Engines – the Embedded Vision Engine and Computer Vision Engine.

The Embedded Vision Engine comes with a 360p detection resolution, has a minimum single-image detection of 64 x 64 pixel and a maximum 4K resolution input and internal scaling which supports region detection.It is also designed for rigid target detection like the human face, head, shoulders.

While the Computer Vision Engine is designed to detect moving targets such as cars, pedestrians, animals and supports a minimum 8 x 8 pixel for small object detection and a maximum image of 720p and has a D1 rate of up to 10fps. The Perimeter Intruder detection supports maximum warning region numbers of 32 and combining calibration algorithm and it can classify people and cars. It also provides support for warning line single/dual direction detection.  

Lindenis Allwinner V5
Lindenis Allwinner V5

The board runs Linux 4.4 as well as Linbian OS based on Debian 9 stack which supports its AIE engine with compute library, Tensorflow, OpenCV and GStreamer with hardware acceleration. It also supports various applications such as panoramic, 3D/VR, as well as other smart cameras such as the smart IPC, VLPR, car DVR and various facial recognition applications.

The Lindenis V5 SBC comes with a Gigabit Ethernet port and optional Wi-Fi/Bluetooth for communications, microSD card and optional eMMC. It also has an audio jack, dual mic inputs, an MIPI-DSI interface for an optional 5-inch LCD – dual MIPI-CSI connectors for an optional 4K ready, 8- megapixel camera module with Sony IMX317 sensor and an HDMI 1.4 port which enables 4K 30fps video output.

The Lindenis V5 also has an RPi compatible 40-pin header and comes with 4 USB 2.0 ports, onboard headers for ADC and 12S, a micro USB port for power input (5V) and a 3.7V li-lion battery connector which makes it quite larger than the Raspberry Pi.

Lindenis V5 wiki, Lindenis V5 shopping page, Lindenis community site and Lindenis Tech. website provides further information.

The SBC is available for $73 in China.

NanoPi M4 – RK3399 Based RPi Clone SBC Costs $65 Only

FriendlyElec has launched the NanoPi M4. It is one of the smallest, most affordable Rockchip RK3399 based SBC yet. The NanoPi M4 has essentially the same layout as the latest Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ and has all of its stand out features. Aside from the different processor, this is a very close resemblance of the RPi 3 B+ except for the lack of PoE support on the GbE port.

On the other hand, it has a faster, native GbE port instead of the RPi 3 B+’s USB-based connection. Like the B+, it has dual-channel 802.11ac on the WiFi/Bluetooth module.

Despite the performance improvements on the RPi 3 B+, the Rockchip RK3399 beats it in speed tests. It also defeats the vast majority of Arm SoCs. The RK3399 has dual Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz and 4x Cortex-A53 cores at 1.5GHz. There’s also a high-end Mali-T864 GPU and a VPU that supports 4K VP9 and 4K 10-bit H265/H264 60fps decoding.

The NanoPi M4 is intended for applications including machine learning, AI, deep learning, robots, industrial control, industrial cameras, advertisement machines, game machines, and blockchain. OS support for this board includes Android 7.1.2 and three Ubuntu-based Linux distributions: Lubuntu 16.04, FriendlyCore 18.04 (Ubuntu Core), and FriendlyDesktop 18.04.

Specifications for the NanoPi M4:

  • Processor:
    • Rockchip RK3399 (2x Cortex-A72 at up to 2.0GHz,
    • 4x Cortex-A53 @ up to 1.5GHz); Mali-T864 GPU
  • Memory:                                                            
    • 2GB or 4GB LPDDR3 RAM (dual-channel)
    • eMMC socket
    • MicroSD slot for up to 128GB
  • Wireless:
    • 802.11b/g/n/ac (2.4GHz/5GHz) with Bluetooth 4.1;
    • 2x IPX antenna connectors
  • Networking: Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Media:
    • HDMI 2.0a port (with audio and HDCP 1.4/2.2) for up to 4K at 60Hz
    • MIPI-DSI (4-lane) with MIPI-CSI co-lay
    • 1x or 2x 4-lane MIPI-CSI (up to 13MP) with dual ISP support; (2nd CSI available via DSI)
    • 3.5mm analog audio I/O jack
  • Other I/O:
    • 4x USB 3.0 host ports
    • USB 3.0 Type-C port (USB 2.0 OTG or power input)
    • Serial debug 4-pin header
  • Expansion:
    • 40-pin RPi compatible header — 3x 3V/1.8V I2C, 3V UART,
    • 3V SPI, SPDIF_TX, up to 8x 3V GPIOs, 1.8V 8-ch. I2S
  • Power: DC 5V/3A input or USB Type-C
  • Operating temperature: -20 to 70℃
  • Dimensions: 85 x 56mm; 8-layer PCB
  • OS Support: Android 7.1.2; Lubuntu 16.04 (32-bit); FriendlyCore 18.04 (64-bit), FriendlyDesktop 18.04 (64-bit)

The NanoPi M4 with 2GB RAM is available now for $65 (for first 300 units), otherwise, the price is $75. The 4GB version costs $105. More information may be found at FriendlyElec’s NanoPi M4 shopping pagewiki, and GitHub page.

Run Windows 95 as an app on Win, MaOS and Linux

This is Windows 95, running in an Electron app. Yes, it’s the full thing and working quite well.It is able to run on Windows, Linux and MacOS.

Download it here: https://github.com/felixrieseberg/windows95/releases (143MB)

  • You can now mount the disk image (on Windows 10 and macOS)
  • The app auto-updates (Windows does not, it’ll stay on Windows 95)
  • You can now see the CPU and HDD working
  • You can now send Ctrl + Alt + Del and reboot the machine from the window menu

SinoVoip Unveils Open-spec Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero SBC

SinoVoIP is going to launch their inexpensive Raspberry Pi Zero compatible, Allwinner H2+ powered board Banana Pi-P2 Zero. This is going to be the successor to Banana Pi M2 Zero. The new Banana Pi-P2 Zero combines support for PoE (Power-over-Ethernet) as well as a CSI camera interface.

Sinovoip Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero
Sinovoip Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero

The Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero is almost identical to last year’s $21 Banana Pi BPI-M2 Zero with a few significant enhancements. The board attaches 8GB eMMC storage, as well as a 10/100 Ethernet port with Power-over-Ethernet support available via an optional PoE module. The new board doubles the weight to 30 grams and extends the smaller dimension by 22.5mm giving it a 65 x 52.5mm footprint.

Other features are almost the same as the M2 Zero, which itself is an emulation of a Raspberry Pi Zero W. The P2 Zero board can run Linux and Android on a 1.2GHz, quad -A7 Allwinner H2+, which is like an Allwinner H3, but with HD instead of 4K video support. The SoC integrates a Mali400 MP2 GPU.

The Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero comes with 512MB DDR3, a microSD card slot, and a WiFi/Bluetooth module. Other features include MIPI-CSI, 40-pin RPi expansion, a mini-HDMI port, a USB 2.0 host port, and a power-only micro-USB OTG port.

Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero specifications:

  • SoC: Allwinner H2+ quad-core Arm Cortex A7 processor with Mali-400MP GPU.
  • Memory:
    • 512MB DDR3 SDRAM.
    • 8GB eMMC flash
    • Micro SD card slot
  • Video Output: mini HDMI port
  • Connectivity:                    
    • 10/100M Ethernet with PoE support
    •  WiFi & Bluetooth via AP6212 module
  • The camera I/F: CSI camera interface
  • USB: 1x USB OTG port
  • Expansion:
    • 40-pin GPIO header with UART, SPI, I2C, etc…
    • 3-pin UART header for serial console access
  • Power Supply:                    
    • 5V/2A via micro USB port
    • Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)
  • Dimensions: 65 x 52.5mm
  • Supported OS: Linux, Android

No pricing or availability information was provided for the Banana Pi BPI-P2. More information may be found on SinoVoip’s Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero wiki page.

Seco’s New i.MX8M And i.MX8Quad Based Modules Run Linux

Seco Embedded Creators have launched the i.MX8M based Q7-C25 and i.MX8Quad based Q7-C26. Both can run Linux and Android, and are available in 0 to 60°C and -40 to 85°C models. The 5V modules have many similar features, but the Q7-C26 based on the more powerful, up to hexacore i.MX8Quad adds some extras such as SATA III support.

Seco Q7-C25
Seco Q7-C25

The Q7-C25 utilizes NXP’s dual- or quadcore, 1.5GHz Cortex-A53 i.MX8M. It facilitates a 266MHz Cortex-M4 MCU and a Vivante GC7000Lite GPU. Unlike the Quad and Dual models, the quad-core i.MX8M QuadLite model lacks a VPU.

On the other hand, the Q7-C26 features the more powerful i.MX8Quad, which is available in quad A53 configurations, but clocked to a lower 1.26GHz. All three i.MX8Quad Quad models also accommodate dual Cortex-M4 MCUs and dual GC7000Lite GPUs. The mid-range i.MX8QuadPlus model combines 1x Cortex-A72 core and the high-end QuadMax adds 2x -A72 cores.

Seco Q7-C26
Seco Q7-C26

Both the Q7-C25 and Q7-C26 ship with onboard LPDDR4-3200 RAM, but only the Q7-C25 lists a quantity, which is up to 4GB. They both offer presumably optional eMMC and QSPI flash onboard, but no quantities are listed. Only the Q7-C26 supports SATA III, but it’s a factory option swap-out for one of the 2x PCIe x1 interfaces provided by both modules. Both COMs also combine a GbE controller.

Both the Q7-C25 and Q7-C26 support up to 4096 x 2160p60 video output with HDR via an HDMI 2.0A port. On the Q7-C26 DisplayPort 1.3 is supported, and the Q7-C26 also supports HDCP 2.2. Both modules also provide an HD-ready LVDS interface, I2S audio, and a MIPI-CSI camera interface.

The Q7-C25 supports 5x USB ports compared to 6x on the Q7-C26. Yet on the Q7-C25, two of those are USB 3.0 compared to one on the Q7-C26, which is the only one to support a USB OTG port. Common features on both modules are 2x I2C, 8x GPIO, and single UART, CAN, SPI, and SD connections. They both supply a watchdog and power management signals and the Q7-C26 also features a boot select signal.

Both modulessupport the same 3.5-inch form-factor, cross-platform (Arm and x86) CQ7-A42 carrier board. Another option is a Q7 Dev Kit 2.0 that offers a different and much larger CQ7-A30 board with more legacy connections.

No pricing or availability information was provided for the  Q7-C25 and Q7-C26 modules or related carrier boards and kits as they are currently under development. More information may be found in the following Seco product pages for Q7-C25Q7-C26CQ7-A42 and Q7 Dev Kit 2.0.

Sapphire’s New FS-FP5V SBC Incorporates Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC

Sapphire Technology, a Hong Kong-based technology company, has launched a 147.3 x 139.7mm Mini-STX (almost 5×5-inch) form factor SBC that runs Ubuntu 16.04 or Windows. It is powered by AMD’s new Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. AMD’s Ryzen V1000 is highly competitive on CPU performance with the latest Intel Core chips, and the Radeon Vega graphics with it, are superior enough for enabling four 4K displays to run at once.

Sapphire's FS-FP5V SBC
Sapphire’s FS-FP5V SBC

The only other Ryzen V1000 based SBC, 120 x 120mm is Udoo Bolt, which ships to Kickstarter backers in December. Sapphire’s commercial board FS-FP5V is available for sale now with shipments beginning later this month.

The FS-FP5V base model starts at $325, equipped with the dual-core, quad-thread V1202B version of the Ryzen V1000 with lower-end Vega 3 graphics. The three models with the quad-core, octa-threaded versions of the SoC go for $340, $390, and $450, with increasing clock speeds and graphics ranging from Vega 8 to 11.

Pricing, which does not include RAM or storage, seems to be a bit higher than the Udoo Bolt. The Bolt also adds an Atmega32U4 MCU for Arduino and Grove compatibility but is limited to the two lower-end V1000 SoC models. The FS-FP5V, which has up to 4x DisplayPorts, is more directly aimed at digital signage and other media-centric applications including electronic gaming, medical imaging, thin clients, and POS terminals.

This is Sapphire’s first Mini-STX SBC. Its other AMD-based motherboards include AMD R-Series based Mini-ITX boards and some 4×4-inch eNUC form factor boards such as the G-Series based LX 210. A Sapphire representative says his company can make custom boards based on the Ryzen V1000. They also show a Kubb enclosure for the FS-FP5V from Bleujour, as well as an upcoming 2×2 digital signage display wall from Seneca Data that taps the FS-FP5V to generate 4x 4K displays.

The FS-FP5V is available now starting at $325, with shipments starting later this month. More information may be found on Sapphire’s FS-FP5V product page.

Google Unveils USB Type-C Version Of It’s Edge TPU AI Chip

Google has come up with its Edge TPU machine learning chip announcement by also revealing a USB Type-C based device that can be plugged into any Linux or Android Things computer, including a Raspberry Pi. The company announced a USB stick computer version of Edge TPU that can work with any Linux or Android Things computer. It also published more details on the upcoming, NXP-based Edge TPU development kit, including its SoC NXP i.MX8M.

Two views of the Edge TPU dev kit
Google’s Edge TPU dev kit

The Edge TPU Accelerator uses the same mini-scaled Edge TPU neural network coprocessor that is built into the upcoming dev kit. It has a USB Type-C port to connect with any Debian Linux or Android Things computer to accelerate machine learning (ML) inferencing for local edge analytics. The 65 x 30mm device has mounting holes for host boards such as a Raspberry Pi Zero.

Same as the Edge TPU development kit, the Edge TPU Accelerator enables the processing of machine learning (ML) inference data directly on-device. This local ML accelerator increases privacy, removes the need for persistent connections, reduces latency, and allows for high performance using less power.

The Edge TPU Accelerator starts competing with products like Intel’s Neural Compute Stick, previously referred to as the Fathom. The USB-equipped Neural Compute Stick is equipped with the Movidius Myriad 2 VPU and neural network accelerator.

The Edge TPU dev kit details

The Edge TPU Accelerator is going to ship in October this year along with the Edge TPU chip and development kit. It was informed that the computer-on-module that features the Edge TPU will run either Debian Linux or Android Things on NXP’s i.MX8M. The 1.5GHz, Cortex-A53 based i.MX8M integrates a Vivante GC7000Lite GPU and VPU, as well as a 266MHz Cortex-M4 MCU.

The yet unnamed, 48 x 40mm module will ship with 1GB LPDDR4, 8GB eMMC, dual-band WiFi-ac, and Bluetooth 4.1. The baseboard of the dev kit will add a microSD slot, as well as single USB Type-C OTG, Type-C power (5V input), USB 3.0 host, and micro-USB serial console ports.

The Edge TPU development kit baseboard is further provided with GbE and HDMI 2.0a ports, as well as a 39-pin FPC connector for 4-lane MIPI-DSI and a 24-pin FPC for 4-lane MIPI-CSI2. There’s also a 40-pin expansion connector, but with no claims for Raspberry Pi compatibility. The 85 x 56mm board also provides an audio jack, a digital mic, and a 4-pin terminal for stereo speakers.

More information may be found in the Edge TPU Accelerator announcement, as well as the original Edge TPU announcement.

MintBox Mini 2 comes with more power and it is 50% faster than its predecessor.

The first MintBox Mini was released in 2015 in partnership between Compulab and the Linux Mint team. Since then, there has been an advancement in the software and the hardware that powered the first iteration. In March 2018, Compulab has continued with the Linux Mini Project releasing a replacement for the AMD A10 based MintBox Mini Pro mini PC called the MintBox Mini 2 (MBM2).

MintBox Mini 2 PC

The new MintBox Mini 2 comes with a new upgrade to the processor. It comes with a quad-core Apollo lake Intel Celeron J3455 SoC (System on Chip). This new upgrade gives it more power potential over the AMD A10-Micro 6700T of Mintbox Mini Pro and it is even 30 per cent faster. As usual, the MBM2 is modelled after Compulab’s Fitlet 2 mini PC (personal computer), and it comes with new FACET expansion cards for 2.5-inch HARD DISK DRIVE (HDDs), Power over Ethernet (PoE), CONTROLLER AREA NETWORK (CAN) bus and many more.

MintBox Mini 2 comes with the latest Linux Mint 19 “Tara” Cinnamon Edition distro operating system, and it offers Intel HD Graphics 500 and a 10W TDP (Thermal Design Power).

The MintBox Mini 2 is available in two main variants:

  • The MintBox Mini 2, and
  • the MintBox Mini 2 Pro.

The MintBox Mini2 is available for a cost of $299 and the pro version for $349. The ordinary Mini2 comes with a 4GB DDR3 RAM and a 64GB SSD for system storage and the Mini2 Pro comes with 8GB DDR3 RAM and higher storage of 120GB SSD. Of course, you can increase both system memory up to about 16GB RAM.

Other features include HDMI 1.4a and mini-DisplayPort, dual GbE ports, 2x USB 3.0 which are facing the front, two rear-facing USB 2.0, and a mini-RS232 port. It also comes with an Intel 8260 wireless chipset with WiFi 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2, a micro-SD slot, and dual 3.5mm audio jacks. Temperature range is -40°C to 85°C, there is a 7 to 20V DC input, and the dimensions are 112m by 84mm by 34mm.

MintBox Mini 2 Block Diagram

There are six optional FACET expansion cards which have been provided by Compulab for the MintBox Mini 2:

  • FC-M2LAN — 2x additional GbE ports (for 4x overall)
  • FC-POED — additional (third) GbE port with power via Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) and “preserve WiFi.”
  • FC-PCI or FC-CEM — 4G modem + WiFi + M.2 2280 SATA SSD
  • HDx —5-inch SATA HDD/SSD up to 15mm / 5TB
  • FC-USB — 4x additional USB ports (for 8x overall)
  • FC-SCG — RS232/RS485, GPIOs, and CANbus port

The two types of MintBox Mini 2 PCs are now available from Compulab and the Linux Mint project, and they come with a five-year warranty. Five per cent of all the revenues gathered to go to the Linux Mint project. If you are interested in purchasing the MintBox Mini 2 PCs, you now get it on the product page, and it is also expected that the product will be available on Amazon from August.

VIA Snapdragon 820 Based SOM now compatible with Linux

VIA Technologies known for its array of embedded boards and solutions has announced the release of a Linux Board Support Package (BSP) based on the Yocto 2.0.3 for the VIA SOM-9×20 module.

The VIA SOM 9×20 module was custom designed and meant for the Android platform and so migrating to a Linux framework was something that was inevitable and less tedious to achieve as compared to migrating to a different framework.

According to the Richard Brown, the Vice-president of International Marketing at VIA, he says that –

The release of the Linux BSP gives our customers an additional option for the development of Edge AI systems and devices powered by the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 820E Embedded Platform

The Linux BSP is expected to provide features like:

  • Supports UFS boot
  • Supports HDMI display
  • Supports AUO MIPI capacitive touch panels through the USB interface
  • AUO 10.1” B101UAN01.7 (1920×1200)
  • Supports COM as debug port
  • Supports two Gigabit Ethernet
  • Supports Mic-in and stereo 2W speaker
  • Supports built-in Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.1, and GPS
  • Supports MIPI CSI camera OV13850

The VIA SOM 9×20 module is one of those modules you can’t afford to pass you by. At the heart of the module is the powerful Qualcomm Snapdragon 820E embedded platform, the high performance embedded platform designed to power the next generation of mobile devices and applications with low power consumption, and an array of possible connectivity.

 

The SOM 9×20 module measures at about 82 x 45mm in a SODIMM styled form factor. It features four Cortex-A72-like cores Kryo cores: two at 2.2GHz and two at 1.6GHz. The SoC is boosted with an integrated Adreno 530 GPU at 624MHz, Hexagon 680 DSP, and 14-bit Spectra ISP. The module ships with an inbuilt 64GB eMMC Flash memory, 4GB LPDDR4 in a POP package, rich I/O and display expansion options through its MXM 3.0 314-pin connector.

It supports USB 3.0, USB 2.0, HDMI 2.0, SDIO, PCIe, MIPI CSI, MIPI DSI, and multi-function pins for UART, I2C, SPI, and GPIO through the MXM connector. Other possibilities include interfaces for  MIPI-CSI and LCD touchscreen, dual speakers, and a mini-PCIe slot.

VIA also announced a $569 price for the evaluation kit package, which combines the Snapdragon 820 based module with its SOMDB2 Carrier Board. In order to simplify the design, testing, and deployment of intelligent Edge AI applications, VIA is making the SOM 9X20 module to be available as part of its Edge AI Developer Kit, which features a SOMDB2 Carrier Board and optional 13MP camera module that is optimized for intelligent real-time video capture, processing, and edge analysis.

The kit is available in two configurations from the VIA Embedded online store at:

  • VIA SOM-9X20 SOM Module and SOMDB2 Carrier Board with 13MP CMOS Camera Module (COB 1/3.06” 4224×3136 pixels): US$629 plus shipping
  • VIA SOM-9X20 SOM Module and SOMDB2 Carrier Board: US$569 plus shipping
  • Optional 10.1” MIPI LCD touch panel: US$179 plus shipping.

The Linux BSP for the VIA SOM 9X20 module is available now, and also an upgraded android 8.0 is available as well. More information about the product is available on the product page.

ICNexus’s SBC3100 Runs Linux On Rockchip RK3399 SoC

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ latest entry with Rockchip RK3399 SoC, SBC3100 joins the growing list of high-end SBCs. It features the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. However, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

ICNexus SBC3100
ICNexus SBC3100

ICNexus announced the SBC3100 back in 2017, the SBC3100 was showcased at last week’s Computex show in Taipei. The board ships with Ubuntu and Android images, and is designed for applications including digital signage, POS, gaming, STBs, kiosks and other smart devices.

Despite the high-end features, not much stands out from the other equally powerful RK3399 contender SBCs, except for its wide-range 9-36V DC input and its optional add-on modules. The board can be equipped with an HDMI input, an LVDS touchscreen interface, and a 4-port serial add-on.

The board comes with up to 4GB DDR3 and 16GB flash (presumably eMMC). Media ports accommodate HDMI 2.0, eDP, and DP (via USB Type-C). There are up to 2x MIPI-DSI or -CSI, but not 2x of both, and there’s also a separate camera port and I2C touch interface. There’s a GbE port plus optional WiFi/BT module, and the mini-PCIe slot (with micro-SIM) supports optional 3G or 4G modules.

The SBC3100 provides 4x USB ports, 2x of them are 3.0, plus the Type-C port and additional USB headers. Other features include GPIO, serial debug, IR, I2C, and optional sensors.

Specifications list for the SBC3100:

  • Processor:
    • Rockchip RK3399 (2x Cortex-A72 at up to 2.0GHz, 4x Cortex-A53);
    • Mali-T860 GPU
  • Memory :
    • 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB DDR3 RAM
    • 8GB or 16GB flash
    • MicroSD slot
  • Display/camera:
    • HDMI 2.0 out port at up to 4Kx2K@60fps
    • DisplayPort 1.2 at up to 4Kx2K@60fps (via USB Type-C)
    • eDP 1.3 at up to 2560×1600@60fps
    • 1x or 2x MIPI-DSI at up to 2560×1600 at 60fps with optional MIPI/LVDS touchscreen module
    • 1x or 2x MIPI-CSI with optional HDMI input module
    • Camera port
    • An i2c-based capacitive touch interface
  • Audio: mic/earphone connector; 2x speaker connectors
  • Wireless:
    • Optional 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0
    • Optional 3G or LTE modules for mini-PCIe slot
    • Micro-SIM card slot
  • Networking: Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Other I/O:
    • 4x USB 3.0 host (2x ports, 2x headers)
    • 3x USB 2.0 host (2x ports, 1x header)
    • USB 3.0 Type-C port with DP support
    • Serial console debug
    • Optional serial module with 4x RS232/422/485 DB9 ports
    • 8-bit GPIO
    • I2C master
    • Keypad interface
  • Expansion: Mini-PCIe slot with 3G/LTE support
  • Other features: IR receiver; buzzer; heatsink; optional 3-axis accelerometer; optional gyro/G-Sensor (only on 4GB RAM model)
  • Power: 9-36V DC input; 3/5/12V DC output; power and reset buttons
  • Dimensions:150 x 102 x 2.6mm
  • OS Support: Pre-installed Ubuntu or Android

No pricing information is provided for the SBC3100, but it appears to be available. More information may be found on the ICNexus SBC3100 product page.