Tag Archives: memory

Toshiba launches 256-Gbit 48-layer 3-D NAND flash

Toshiba BiCS

by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

Ready for sampling in September, Toshiba’s 48-layer BiCS (Bit Cost Scalable) flash memory stores 256 Gbits using a 3-D vertically stacked cell structure and 3-bit-per-cell triple-level cell technology. By employing this 48-layer vertical stacking process, BiCS flash surpasses the capacity of conventional 2-D NAND flash memory, where cells are arrayed in a planar direction on a silicon plane.

BiCS also enhances write/erase reliability endurance and boosts write speeds. The 256-Gbit (32-Gbyte) device can be used in a myriad of applications, including consumer solid-state drives, smart phones, tablets, memory cards, and enterprise SSDs for data centers.

Toshiba launches 256-Gbit 48-layer 3-D NAND flash – [Link]

EEPROM Module

C040-500x500-500x500

EEPROM Add-On Board offers an easy way to interface a standard 24Cxx type I2C EEPROM to your project.

Specifications

  • 5 VDC supply sourced through the interfacing Box Header connector
  • Jumper selectable address option available
  • Four mounting holes 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 36 mm x 32 mm

EEPROM Module – [Link]

Nonvolatile memory resists gamma radiation

Maxim DS28E80

Using only one contact to simplify implementations in small, disposable medical sensors, the DS28E80 1-Wire EEPROM from Maxim Integrated Products resists gamma radiation of up to 73 kGy (kiloGray), allowing OEMs to calibrate a consumable medical sensor and to monitor or control unsanitary reuse of medical disposables. Gamma radiation sterilization is typically used on single-use disposable medical sensors and consumables, but the method is incompatible with conventional floating-gate memory technologies, as gamma’s high-ionizing radiation erases the memory.

Nonvolatile memory resists gamma radiation – [Link]

NRAM is the future

20150611094955_NanteroRam-web

by elektormagazine.com:

Nantero have announced that their innovative memory technology based on carbon nanotubes has been licensed and is in production in many fabrication facilities around the world. NRAM memory offers a significant speed advantage, (said to be hundreds of times faster than conventional NAND memory) and can be easily scaled to provide terabits of storage capacity which consume very little power.

Key Features of NRAM technology:

CMOS Compatible: Works in standard CMOS fabs with no new equipment needed

Limitless Scalability: Designed to scale below 5nm in the future

High-Endurance: Proven to operate for orders of magnitude more cycles than flash

Faster Read and Write: Same as DRAM, 100s of times faster than NAND

High Reliability: will retain memory for >1,000 years at 85 degrees Celsius or more than 10 years at 300 degrees Celsius

Low Power: Essentially zero in standby mode, 160x lower write energy per bit than NAND

Low Cost: Simple structure, can be 3D multi-layer and multi-level cell (MLC)

NRAM is the future – [Link]

FlashProg – USB serial flash memory programmer

flashprog-prototype-small1-600x398

Dilshan Jayakody published a new project, the FlashProg – a USB serial flash memory programmer:

FlashProg is USB base flash memory programmer to work with 3.3V serial flash memory devices. This programmer is specifically design to read, program and configure 25x series, serial flash memory devices which are commonly used to store BIOS in PC mainboards.
Originally we design this project to read and program BIOS of Foxconn G31MXP mainboard. Our version of G31MXP contains Macronix MX25L8005 8M-Bit serial flash memory and we use this programmer to load some of our custom BIOS to this serial memory.

FlashProg – USB serial flash memory programmer – [Link]

Cypress Introduces the Industry’s First 4Mb Serial F-RAM

FRAM_2

New F-RAM™ Expands the Density Range of the Most Energy-Efficient Nonvolatile RAMs for Mission-Critical Data Storage.

Cypress Semiconductor introduced a family of 4 Mb serial Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (F-RAMs™), which are the industry’s highest density serial F-RAMs. The 4Mb serial F-RAMs feature a 40-Mhz Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI), a 2.0 V to 3.6 V operating voltage range and are available in industry-standard, RoHS-compliant package options. All Cypress F-RAMs provide 100-trillion read/write cycle endurance with 10-year data retention at 85 °C and 151 years at 65 °C.

Cypress F-RAMs are ideal solutions for applications requiring continuous and frequent high-speed reading and writing of data with absolute data security. The 4 Mb serial F-RAM family addresses mission-critical applications such as industrial controls and automation, industrial metering, multifunction printers, test and measurement equipment and medical wearables.

Cypress Introduces the Industry’s First 4Mb Serial F-RAM – [Link]

3D flash technology moves forward with 10 TB SSDs and the first 48-layer memory cells

high-capacity-3d-flash-memory

by Dario Borghino @ gizmag.com:

Flash storage technology will soon see a three-fold improvement in data density thanks to a joint development at Intel and Micron that will allow the production of 3.5 TB flash sticks and 10 TB standard-sized SSDs. Meanwhile, a new 48-layer cell technology development by Toshiba could pave the way for higher write speeds, more reliability and lower costs in solid state drives.

3D flash technology moves forward with 10 TB SSDs and the first 48-layer memory cells – [Link]

Happy Christmas and Happy New Year wishes from Attiny13

IMG_20141225_065758

by blog.vinu.co.in:

While trying to open a chinese camera pen, unfortunately the PCB inside it got damaged. Few of the PCB traces got cut and it became useless. After few days, I removed an 8 pin IC with SO8 package from the PCB. I was curious to know what it is, so I googled the part number 25FW406A but I couldn’t find any exact match. I found some part number similar to that and I concluded that it is an SPI flash. Later I got a datasheet from ‘ON semiconductor’ for a similar part -LE25U40CMD which is a 4M-bit SPI flash memory. I soldered the IC on a common board, powered it with 3.3v and interfaced it to a TI stellaris launchpad via SPI port. According to the datasheet the SPI port need to be initialized in mode 0 or 3. I tried few commands listed in the datasheet and got proper response from the chip, the CHIP ID doesn’t matches but that is expected because it is not the same part. I wrote functions for erasing, reading and writing the flash memory and tested it successfully using the launchpad.

Happy Christmas and Happy New Year wishes from Attiny13 – [Link]

Researchers use voltage to control magnetic memory

MIT-Voltage-Programming

by Amy Norcross @ edn.com:

A new way of switching the magnetic properties of a material using just a small applied voltage could signal the beginning of a new family of materials with a variety of switchable properties, according to a team of MIT-based researchers. The technique could let a small electrical signal change materials’ electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics.

Researchers use voltage to control magnetic memory – [Link]

The STM32F446 from STMicroelectronics

Impressionby elektor.com:

Evaluation samples of STMicroelectronics’ STM32F446 range of MCUs are now available. These devices feature ARM Cortex-M4 based processing units with compact 256 or 512 KB on-chip Flash options and 128KB RAM with built-in memory-extension interfaces, extended connectivity and communication capabilities.

The MCUs use ST’s proprietary ART Accelerator, smart architecture, advanced Flash technology and an embedded ARM Cortex-M4 core to achieve a performance of 225 DMIPS and 608 CoreMark at 180 MHz executing from embedded Flash.

The interface capabilities allow simultaneous communication via multiple interfaces which cater for interactive industrial, scientific, medical, and Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications, while the advanced process technology, together with dynamic voltage scaling, extensive clock gating and flexible sleep modes offer significant power savings.

The STM32F446 from STMicroelectronics – [Link]