Tag Archives: meter

Mini Arduino Lux Meter

FFXIA2JIN3EHHKH.MEDIUM

Here is a nice build of a LUX meter using BH1750 sensor and a Nokia 5110 LCD. The meter is controlled by an Arduino Pro Mini and is powered by a Li-Ion battery. The LCD backlight is controlled according to environment light and there is graphing capability of the measured light intensity.

That’s when I realized that I had an unused BH1750 light meter module laying around, which I bought some time ago but never used it. So I grabbed an Arduino, a Nokia 5110 LCD, wired everything up on a breadboard and had a functioning lux meter within a few hours. To make it a bit more fancy, I added some graphing functionality and made the LCD backlight switch on/off depending on the light level.

Mini Arduino Lux Meter – [Link]

Electricity Frequency Meter

20160405153003_-5BF5AF6D8EF0B5AC405C364FC55A782001AF62E6DD52E65170-pimgpsh-fullsize-distr

This project is about an accurate mains frequency meter that has a bar-graph displaying the relative deviation from nominal frequency. It can work with 50Hz and 60Hz systems.

An article by Dieter Laues in the February 2012 issue of Elektor inspired me to get my soldering iron out. The article described how by measuring the frequency of the mains electricity supply in any socket, the relative load across the entire electricity network could be determined

Electricity Frequency Meter – [Link]

Internet-of-Things Power Meter

9546711451470984238

This is a simple, cheap, easy to build IoT Power Meter that provides accurate statistics on household power consumption:

The Internet-of-Things Power Meter (IPM) is a device fixed on top of the regular household power meter that provides detailed information about the electricity usage. Modern power meters have a LED blinking every time a Watt is used, the IPM detects these flashes using a light sensor, counts them, saves the values to an SD card. Later the data is stored to the cloud.

Internet-of-Things Power Meter – [Link]

FLIR MR160 Thermal Imaging & Moisture Meter Review, Teardown & Experiments

The Signal Path Blog published another video reviewing  FLIR MR160 Thermal Imaging & Moisture Meter:

In this episode Shahriar takes a close look at the FLIR MR160 Thermal Imaging and Moisture Meter. Featuring Infrared Guided Measurement (IGM) technology powered by a FLIR Lepton® thermal imaging sensor, MR160 helps you quickly see temperature patterns that point to potential hidden moisture so you know right where to place the meter probe to capture accurate readings.

After an overview of the camera functions a full teardown of the instrument is presented. The FLIR MR160 is based on a single PIC32 processor with built-in capacitance measurement capability. The MR160 is then used to detect a moisture spot on a floor tiling. The presence of moisture is then verified with both the pin-less and pin-based moisture measurement capability of the MR160. Finally, the MR160 is also used to measure temperature variation across a bank of resistors.

FLIR MR160 Thermal Imaging & Moisture Meter Review, Teardown & Experiments – [Link]

Capacitance Meter

FIO94ASIDH7U229.MEDIUM

by ThomasVDD @ instructables.com:

Capacitors are vital components in electronics, but sometimes they are broken, or the value printed on the cap has become unreadable. Because my multi-meter does not have a capacitance measurement, I decided to make one!

The principle of measuring capacitance is quite simple. The voltage of a capacitor charging through a resistor increases with time T. The time it takes to reach a certain voltage, is related to the values of the resistor and capacitor. In this project, we’ll use a 555 timer circuit as a monostable multivibrator. If that sounds like some dark magic to you, don’t worry, it’s quite straightforward. I’ll refer to the the Wikipedia page for the details, as we’ll focus on the things we really need: the schematic and formula. The time in which the capacitor C charges through the resistor R is given by: T = ln(3) x R x C = 1.1 RC. If we know the value of the resistor and the time, we can calculate the capacitance: C = T / 1.1R.

Capacitance Meter – [Link]

Non-Invasive Smart Electricity Meter

power

A simple Non-Invasive Smart Electricity Meter using Spark Core. By Yonas Leguesse @ hackster.io:

A non invasive current sensor is connected to the spark core (with a few components), and clamped around a cable in the Mains distribution unit. No wiring is required, however Do not try this at home, as the Mains Distribution Unit should not be tampered with unless one is Licensed to do so.

The back end is Web Application hosted on a LAMP (Linux Apache MySql PHP) setup. Initially it was hosted on a raspberry pi on a LAN, but then I decided to host it on a hosted server. Both instances worked well, its just a matter of preference.

The spark core simply takes periodic readings and sends them to the server, where all of the calculations and filtering is done.

Non-Invasive Smart Electricity Meter – [Link]

LED VU Meter with LM3916

LED_VU_Meter_(3)_th

LM3916 is a dedicated IC for VU LED meter. Unlike LM3915 which have 3dB step between voltage levels, the LM3916 have nonlinear steps: -20, -10, -7, -5, -3, -1, 0, +1, +2, +3db, just like old school analog VU meters. I saw in YouTube an interesting commercial LED VU meter, which imitates the needle movement in analog VU meters and I thought I can make a similar one. All I needed I found in the datasheet of LM3916.

LED VU Meter with LM3916 – [Link]

Simple PIC LC meter

LCmeter_7_th

Here is another piece of laboratory equipment – LC meter. This type of meter, especially L meter is hard to find in cheap commercial multimeters.

Schematic of this one came from this web page: https://sites.google.com/site/vk3bhr/home/index2-html

It uses PIC microcontroller 16F628A, and because I recently acquired a PIC programmer, I decided to test it with this project. Following the above link you will find the original schematic, PCB, source and HEX files for programing the microcontroller and detailed description.

Simple PIC LC meter – [Link]

Inductance/Capacitance Meter Saga

FK2KNEZHXHL6I6K.LARGE

by BasinStreetDesign @ instructables.com:

I had a bunch of random inductors in some random drawers and I wanted to know what values they were. These values are quite often not obvious by looking at the device. Colour codes for old ones were not standardized and some of the coloured rings on inductors can be faded or discoloured so that its impossible to tell what they are. Others may be unmarked and any that are hand-wound are just guess work without a meter. So I decided to make an inductance and capacitance meter which would be fairly accurate and work over several decades of value from a few nano-Henries to a few milli-Henries and also from a few pico-farads to about a micro-farad (hopefully). Sounded easy – what could go wrong?

Inductance/Capacitance Meter Saga – [Link]

Mini LED volume towers (VU meters)

FDVXCL4HX7P6P7Q.LARGE

Here’s a cool Mini LED volume towers project by Ben Finio. He writes a complete step-by-step instructions here:

The inspiration for this project started when I saw a variety of awesome stereo LED towers on YouTube (also referred to as VU meters). Many of the videos showed the end result, and maybe a slideshow of the assembly process, but lacked complete build details or a circuit diagram. So, I set out to find out how they worked, and build my own “mini