Tag Archives: Microcontroller

MC9RS08KB4CFK Minibot

The Minibot is a small autonomous robot vehicle that uses phototransistor that can detect lightness patterns on the ground to follow the edges of the dark lines. It has a MC9RS08KB4 MCU, coin cell, motor, and a phototransistor. The MC9RS08KB4 is part of the MC9RS08KB12 series, a family of RS08KB 8-bit microcontrollers. It features a 4KB flash size, 14 to 18 I/O pins, 8 to 12 channels of ADC, and a 126 RAM size.

The minibot is designed to be smaller than the hand and can be powered using a 3.6V coin cell. It uses a MC9RS08KB4 8-bit microcontroller. The two phototransistors are used as lightness sensors connected to the input pins of an analog comparator (PTA0 and PTA1). The two 2N7002K N-channel motors are connected to pin PTB4 and PTB5 that can be configured to the PWM ports. The LED is used for surface lighting.

The Minibot is applicable to automated guided vehicle that may be developed to larger robot or smaller robot for specific applications. The MC9RS08KB4 can be used in toys, handheld instruments, lighting control, battery charger and management, and simple logic replacements.

MC9RS08KB4CFK Minibot – [Link]

Kinetis KEA128 StarterTRAK for CAN Applications

This reference design is a low-cost development kit based on Kinetis EA series MCUs that allows faster prototyping and tool reuse. This evaluation board features either one of the KEA128, KEA64 or KEA8 MCUs, depending on the board version. This particular design uses KEA128. The Kinetis EA series MCUs are a highly scalable portfolio of 32-bits ARM Cortex -M0+ MCUs aimed for general automotive applications. The family is optimized for cost-sensitive applications offering low pin-count option with very low power consumption.

This design utilizes a Kinetis KEA128 MCU, which has an ARM Cortex-M0+ core. Also, it features a CAN module, a UART module with LIN capabilities, a pulse width timer (PWT) and a keyboard interrupt module (KBI). All these peripherals along with standard serial communication protocols such as I2C and SPI offer flexibility for a wide variety of applications. The TRK-KEA board includes an onboard OpenSDA programmer and debugger, LIN physical transceiver, CAN physical transceiver, a light sensor, four LEDs and two pushbuttons for user interface.

With 2.7V-5.5V supply and focus on exceptional electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and ESD robustness, Kinetis EA series MCUs devices are well suited to a wide range of applications ranging from body applications, powertrain companion chips or generic sensor nodes, park assistance, pump/fan controller, and motorcycle CDI/EFI. In automotive body applications, the Kinetis EA series MCUs are a great option for entry level body controller or gateway module, window/roof/sun-roof controller, immobilizer or seat/mirror controller, ambient lighting, just to mention a few.

Kinetis KEA128 StarterTRAK for CAN Applications – [Link]

ATMEGA328 Component Tester

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baweja_akshay @ instructables.com has build a ATMEGA328 component tester that is able to test Resistors, Capacitors, Inductors, BJT, FET, Thyristors and more.

Coming upon COMPONENT TESTER so it can test almost everything, obviously not the power components because they require more current and power which our AVR Microcontroller couldn’t handle !! Oh yeah, I forgot to tell you guys that we would be using an ATMEGA328 for our build !!

ATMEGA328 Component Tester – [Link]

10 steps to selecting a microcontroller

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Jacob Beningo @ edn.com discuss on how to select the right mcu for your next project based on hardware and software architecture.

Selecting the right microcontroller for a product can be a daunting task. Not only are there a number of technical features to consider, there are also business case issues such as cost and lead-times that can cripple a project. At the start of a project there is a great temptation to jump in and start selecting a microcontroller before the details of the system has been hashed out. This is of course a bad idea.

10 steps to selecting a microcontroller – [Link]

How to migrate from Microchip to Freescale and Why

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Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio has pointed us to this latest article on why to choose Freescale mcu versus Microchip ones:

The task of choosing the best micro for an application is not made easier by the multitude of suppliers you have at hand today, this being the drawback of having so many options. The main competitors on the microcontroller market are Freescale, Microchip, Infineon, STMicroelectronics, Texas Instruments, Analog Devices and Maxim Integrated Products. Comparing all of them is done by specialized and dedicated divisions within these companies or within marketing companies. We will only concentrate in this article to prove the superiority of the Freescale solutions over the ones coming from Microchip.

How to migrate from Microchip to Freescale and Why – [Link]

2 Digit 99 Seconds Timer

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2 Digit Count Down Timer is a utility Count Down timer project for upto 99 seconds of countdown time. This project can find many uses in your shack and home. The relay output remains on during the Count Down period, allowing you to interface load or alarm that you want to keep it on for a certain amount of time (in seconds).

Specifications

  • Microcontroller based design for greater accuracy and control
  • Power supply input 12 VDC 200 mA
  • Two 0.5″ display segments to display time
  • 12V SPDT (Single Pole Double Throw) relay for alarm use
  • Single key start and dual key alarm time set function
  • Power and Relay-On LED indicator
  • Terminal connectors for connecting power supply input and relay output to the PCB
  • Onboard regulator for regulated supply to the kit
  • Crystal resonator based design for better accuracy
  • PCB dimensions 72 mm x 81 mm

2 Digit 99 Seconds Timer – [Link]

DIY-Thermocam – an open-source, do-it-yourself thermographic camera

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Max Ritter has pointed us to his latest project, the DIY-Thermocam, a open source thermal imager based on FLIR thermal sensor. The results are awesome!

The device is based on the popular FLIR Lepton thermal sensor and uses a Teensy 3.2 mikrocontroller to display live thermal images on a nice 3.2 inch touch screen.

The aim of the project is to give private persons, educational institutes and small companies access to a low-cost thermographic plattform. Offered as a selfy-assembly kit, the DIY-Thermocam is easy to build and use, you just need a basic soldering iron and some tools everyone has at home. The whole firmware is published on Github, so everyone can contribute their own ideas to the software development.

DIY-Thermocam – an open-source, do-it-yourself thermographic camera – [Link]

UCload new PCB build

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Sjaak has published a new PCB build, uC controlled dummy load:

With no snow outside I finally got around to solder the 3rd PCB. It is the second revision of a microcontroller dummy load. It is loosely based on the arachnidlabs uc:load. It uses the same base ciruit and adds a microcontroller (PIC16F1825), rotary encode switch, external powersupply and offcourse a 128×32 OLED.

UCload new PCB build – [Link]

Texas CC2538 based development board

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Jelmer Tiete has designed a development board for the TI CC2538, that is available at GitHub:

It’s a nice little system-on-chip with an ARM Cortex M3, 2.4 GHz 802.15.4 radio and it runs at 32 MHz. Perfect for all your favorite Internet Of Things (IOT) shenanigans. Contiki supports this chip pretty well, which means easy 6LoWPAN, RPL and CoAP support.

Texas CC2538 based development board – [Link]