Tag Archives: Microcontroller

Development board for PIC16F1938

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Raj over at Embedded Lab has designed a development board for PIC16F1938:

The PIC16F1938 is a versatile 28-pin MCU belonging to Microchip’s extreme low power microcontroller family featuring nanoWatt XLP technology, 28KB of programming memory, 1KB of RAM, 11 ADC channels, and tons of other peripherals. A while ago, I designed a development board for this MCU and I thought it would be worth sharing this design here. The development board features an onboard USB-UART bridge to support the ds30 Loader for easy programming of the PIC MCU. All I/O pins are accessible through 2×5 headers.

Development board for PIC16F1938 – [Link]

Microchip’s first ARM processor with cryptographic engine

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Clemens Valens @ elektormagazine.com discuss about the new CEC1302 microcontroller from Microchip. This is the first Microchip microcontroller with an ARM core. He writes:

Based on a Cortex-M4 core its main feature is its integrated cryptographic engine supporting public key encryption, symmetric key encryption, secure hashing and random number generating.

Besides its ARM core the CEC1302 incorporates 128 KB of SRAM and 32 KB of boot ROM. Contrary to popular design, the device does not have flash program memory, instead it has two SPI memory interfaces to connect to external program memory.

Microchip’s first ARM processor with cryptographic engine – [Link]

4 Channel RC Servo Controller Board

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This PIC microcontroller based RC driver is able to control 4 RC Servo by on board independent 4 potentiometer , 4X3PIN header for RC servo interface, screw terminal for supply input, on board power LED, optional 4X3PIN header connector for external potentiometer.

Features

  • Microcontroller based design for greater flexibility and ease of control
  • Individual servo controlled via onboard preset or external potentiometer
  • Power supply input 5 VDC
  • Screw terminal connector for easy connection of the input power supply
  • Protection diode for reverse supply
  • Berg connector for connection of Servos
  • Power-On LED indicator
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 56.52mm x 64.14 mm
4 Channel RC Servo Controller Board – [Link]

Low cost OBD2 communications on K-line

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RichardvdK @ instructables.com shows us how to use OBD port of your vehicle to push data on a LCD screen. To achieve that he used a 16F886 microcontroller and some common electronics parts.

This is just another OBD2 solution for monitoring the sensors in a vehicle. It supports the K-line OBD2 serial communication between a vehicle and a microcontroller. This K-line communication is also known as ISO 9141-2 or ISO 14230-4 (also known as Keyword Protocol 2000 or KWP). Both ISO’s are almost similar. This solution differs from the rest that is low cost. It is low cost in the way that you don’t need an arduino, raspberry pi or smart phone. Just a microcontroller and LCD display so you can use your smartphone for other purposes.

Low cost OBD2 communications on K-line – [Link]

ESP8266 Wifi controlled Home Automation

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geekrex @ instructables.com shows us how to use ESP8266 Wifi module for home automation. He writes:

ESP8266 is a great thing for starting to Wifi And IOT. It is also cheap and be used for making cool projects connected to the Internet .Learn how to make a simple IOT Project with it ESP8266 WLAN Module could be a self contained SOC with integrated TCP/IP protocol stack that may offer any microcontroller access to your WLAN network.

ESP8266 Wifi controlled Home Automation – [Link]

DS1307 RTC Module

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The module based on DS1307, The DS1307 serial real-time clock (RTC) is a low-power, full binary-coded decimal (BCD) clock/calendar plus 56 bytes of NV SRAM. Address and data are transferred serially through an I²C, bidirectional bus. The clock/calendar provides seconds, minutes, hours, day, date, month, and year information. The end of the month date is automatically adjusted for months with fewer than 31 days, including corrections for leap year. The clock operates in either the 24-hour or 12-hour format with AM/PM indicator. The DS1307 has a built-in power-sense circuit that detects power failures and automatically switches to the backup supply. Timekeeping operation continues while the part operates from the backup supply.

Specifications

  • Supply 5V DC
  • Completely Manages All Timekeeping Functions
  • Real-Time Clock Counts Seconds, Minutes, Hours, Date of the Month, Month, Day of the Week, and Year with Leap-Year Compensation Valid Up to 2100
  • 56-Byte, Battery-Backed, General-Purpose RAM with Unlimited Writes
  • Programmable Square-Wave Output Signal
  • Simple Serial Port Interfaces to Most Microcontrollers

DS1307 RTC Module – [Link]

ulibSD – a library for use SD cards in SPI mode with uControllers

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electronictechnician.wordpress.com has published a library for use SD cards in SPI completely written in C.

It’s a library for use SD cards in SPI mode with uControllers, entirely written in C. This library can work with SD cards and also has the possibility to emulate the behavior in a PC file (GNU/Linux) using the macro _M_IX86. It’s for debugging purposes. The data transfer is oriented to 512 byte size, remember this.

ulibSD – a library for use SD cards in SPI mode with uControllers – [Link]

Getting Started with Micro Python

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Jacob Beningo has published a tutorial on how to start with Micro Python to build real-time embedded applications.

The first step a developer interested in Micro Python must take before diving into a real-time embedded application is to select a supported development kit or microprocessor. The best place for a developer look for a supported development kit is to check-out the Micro Python Github Board Summary page.

Getting Started with Micro Python – [Link]

Getting Started with Atmel ATtiny10

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Mahesh @ electronut.in show us how to program these tiny microcontrollers (ATtiny10) with Atmel Studio 7 and make an RGB led to light.

I like Atmel tinyAVRs because they are tiny computers that I can (almost) wrap my head around. The Atmel ATtiny4/5/9/10 are the cheapest in the tinyAVR line, and they come in two packages – SOT23 pictured above, and an even more stupendously small 2mm x 2mm USON package. This article will talk about programming these little chips. Though they may be tiny, they are still quite capable, and the right choice for many projects.

Getting Started with Atmel ATtiny10 – [Link]

Programming an ATtiny with Arduino board

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This detailed tutorial shows how to program an ATtiny45, ATtiny85, ATtiny44 or ATtiny84 microcontroller using the Arduino software.

The ATtiny45 or 85 is a great option for running simple Arduino programs: it’s small, cheap and relatively easy to use. It does, however, have some limitations relative to the ATmega328P on an Arduino Uno. There are fewer pins, meaning you can’t connect as many components.

Programming an ATtiny with Arduino board – [Link]