Tag Archives: Microcontroller

ulibSD – a library for use SD cards in SPI mode with uControllers

SD_Card_SPI

electronictechnician.wordpress.com has published a library for use SD cards in SPI completely written in C.

It’s a library for use SD cards in SPI mode with uControllers, entirely written in C. This library can work with SD cards and also has the possibility to emulate the behavior in a PC file (GNU/Linux) using the macro _M_IX86. It’s for debugging purposes. The data transfer is oriented to 512 byte size, remember this.

ulibSD – a library for use SD cards in SPI mode with uControllers – [Link]

Getting Started with Micro Python

MicroPython Figure 3

Jacob Beningo has published a tutorial on how to start with Micro Python to build real-time embedded applications.

The first step a developer interested in Micro Python must take before diving into a real-time embedded application is to select a supported development kit or microprocessor. The best place for a developer look for a supported development kit is to check-out the Micro Python Github Board Summary page.

Getting Started with Micro Python – [Link]

Getting Started with Atmel ATtiny10

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Mahesh @ electronut.in show us how to program these tiny microcontrollers (ATtiny10) with Atmel Studio 7 and make an RGB led to light.

I like Atmel tinyAVRs because they are tiny computers that I can (almost) wrap my head around. The Atmel ATtiny4/5/9/10 are the cheapest in the tinyAVR line, and they come in two packages – SOT23 pictured above, and an even more stupendously small 2mm x 2mm USON package. This article will talk about programming these little chips. Though they may be tiny, they are still quite capable, and the right choice for many projects.

Getting Started with Atmel ATtiny10 – [Link]

Programming an ATtiny with Arduino board

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This detailed tutorial shows how to program an ATtiny45, ATtiny85, ATtiny44 or ATtiny84 microcontroller using the Arduino software.

The ATtiny45 or 85 is a great option for running simple Arduino programs: it’s small, cheap and relatively easy to use. It does, however, have some limitations relative to the ATmega328P on an Arduino Uno. There are fewer pins, meaning you can’t connect as many components.

Programming an ATtiny with Arduino board – [Link]

ATtiny85 Game Console

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webboggles.com has designed a SSD1306 OLED Screen based game kit using an ATtiny85 microcontroller. They also sell it as a kit to assemble it yourself.

The new snap case has been updated to allow enough height for the screen header as well as a factory made CR2032 battery holder.
The buttons have been concealed to prevent spontaneous button presses inside bags and pockets.

ATtiny85 Game Console – [Link]

ATTiny85 board A First Look and review

educ8s.tv wanted to take a look at this tiny board for a long time. It is very small size, it is low cost and it uses a different processor than the Arduino boards. It uses the ATTiny 85 microcontroller chip, which can operate at a frequency up to 20Mhz. It has 8Kb of flash memory, 512bytes of RAM memory and 6 I/O pins 2 of which can implement the I2C protocol. It is very small in size and has low power requirements. We can program it using the Arduino IDE, which makes things so much easier! I got this tiny board with a USB interface in order to be easier to program. You can find a link for this ATtiny85 board in the description of the video.

educ8s.tv wanted to test if the ATtiny85 board is a good option for simple projects and if we achieve longer battery life with this board that a standard Arduino mini. Let’s find out together.

ATTiny85 board A First Look and review – [Link]

Get ready for MPLAB Express

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Chas from iradan.com discuss about MPLAB Express, the new cloud IDE from Microchip for PIC microcontrollers. He writes:

I credit the maker movement with bringing electronics back from the crusty old and lonely electronics hobby back into the main stream. The Arduino is the micro of choice for this army of makers and I conceded it made sense… you install the IDE, plugged in your board into the USB port and a couple clicks later and you have an LED blinking.. the most exciting blinking LED you’d ever seen in most cases. I stuck with the PIC micros because I didn’t see any need to put back on the training wheels.

Get ready for MPLAB Express – [Link]

$2 Arduino – ATMEGA328 as a stand-alone

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In this tutorial you will learn how to use ATMEGA328 microcontroller as standalone Arduino. This way you can minify your next arduino project.

They cost only 2 bucks, can do the same as your Arduino and make your projects extremely small.

We will cover the pin layout, how to make it ready for the Arduino software by burning a bootloader and how to upload sketches.

$2 Arduino – ATMEGA328 as a stand-alone – [Link]

Generating Analog Voltage with Digital Circuit

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Maurizio show us how to generate an analog voltage using a microcontroller and some resistors.

The purpose of this article is how to generate analog voltage with digital circuit. Although the market provides today a very broad range of dedicated digital-to-analogue converters, putting such a device in the schematic has a negative impact on the overall cost of the system. There are however, cheap methods of creating the required voltage levels, and even of generating pseudo-analogue signals, using purely digital means.

Generating Analog Voltage with Digital Circuit – [Link]

SolarBoost – Make Your Own USB Solar Mobile Charger

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SolarBoost is an open source smart interface that allows you to build your own powerful and portable solar charger for your phone and other mobile devices. It has two USB ports and can provide 5V @ 2A at each of them and is controlled by a 8-bit 32MHz Microchip PIC microcontroller. It is also equipped with various protection features like soft-start, over-temperature, over-charge, over-discharge, short-circuit and current limiter.

SolarBoost is the first open-hardware and open-source smart interface designed to give you the freedom and flexibility to make your own battery- and solar-powered power bank for charging cellphones, tablets, MP3 players, speakers, GPS navigators, and much more. Use it to also power your DIY electronics projects!

SolarBoost – Make Your Own USB Solar Mobile Charger – [Link]