Tag Archives: Nixie

Making of a New Nixie Tube

Dalibor Farny shows us how he hand make new Nixie tubes on this interesting video!

The nixie tube is a vintage display device which had been used until 70s when it was replaced with LED displays. The complex knowledge of manufacture of nixie tubes literally died with tube factory’s engineers, glassblowers and machine operators. I discovered nixie tubes in 2011 and since then, I’ve devoted all my time to studies of nixie tubes and its manufacturing processes. After years of intensive work, with help of many people, I eventually succeeded and have revived the knowledge and equipment for production of nixie tubes.

Making of a New Nixie Tube – [Link]

Nixie Bargraph Kit

Robin @ kickstarter.com launched his new campaign on a project using IN-9 Nixie tubes. Now you can easily control two IN-9 Nixie bargraph tubes with 2 PWM inputs from your Arduino, Raspberry or other control board. The tubes are controlled by PWM signals and adjusting the PWM duty cycle you can control the tubes height, thay easy!

I had the idea for this project after building myself a Nixie bargraph clock which looked fantastic and eye catching. Instead of using conventional nixie tubes, which use numbers to display the time, the time is indicated by the height of the neon glow. But, this isn’t just limited to displaying the time, anything can be indicated with these tubes, temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, proximity… anything!

Adjustable HV Power Supply for Stompbox

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This SMPS can be powered with low input voltage, from 5 VDC to 15 VDC and provided adjustable Output Voltage: + 92 Vdc to +340 Vdc.

Can be used too, as power supply, for the Xenon Lamp, Nixie tube Clock, VFD display, Magic Eye, Neon, and too many others electronics circuits who need HV power supply to work. Is great to use with many models of Nixie tube. It can drive 6 Nixie tubes, in multiplex mode, from 180 to 200V. Powered with low voltage from 5VDC to 15 VDC. With this SMPS you can power 250V @ current of 7.5mA! *In all case above, important note, DC and AC filters must be improved, if is desired reducing present HF frequency noises at output! Another fact, informed before, the RF energy is irradiated as magnetic and electric field, shielded assembly could be necessary!

Adjustable HV Power Supply for Stompbox – [Link]

IN-4 Nixie Clock using ATmega168

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andrea biffi @ instructables.com has a detailed tutorial on how to build your own Nixie clock using IN-4 tubes and Atmel ATMega168 microcontroller.

Nixies are neon valve tubes, where ten cathodes have shape of digits and are lighted up by plasma when high voltage flows through them. I love these old era displays, which have been employed in last century before I was born.

In last year I’ve been slowly collecting components and knowledge to build some nixie clocks as Max Pierson’s beautiful creation, I like the old style, the roundness of glass tubes, the rough wood case, the simplicity of the design. That clock has definitely inspired my project. Even though I really love vertical digits arrangement I keep that original feature for my next clock.

IN-4 Nixie Clock using ATmega168 – [Link]

Eagle – Create Nixie tube footprint

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lucadentella.it shows us how to create a Nixie tube footprint by placing the pads in a circular way.

I’m working with Eagle to prepare a PCB for a Nixie clock. I wasn’t able to find a library for the Nixie I chose so I had to create it from scratch.

Eagle – Create Nixie tube footprint – [Link]

Nixie thermometer

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Luca Dentella has build a Nixie thermometer to measure the temperature of the liquid cooling system, file are available on Github.

I decided to log the design and the development of the project in ten blog posts. They show my “divide et impera” approach: I divided the whole project in small tasks (drive a nixie with Arduino, read the temperature from a thermistor, use an rgb led module, prepare the first prototype on a perfboard, design the pcb, assembly the final product), all described on my blog with examples and videos.

Nixie thermometer – [Link]

 

Nixie Tube Energy Meter

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John Whittington decided to build a Nixie tube energy meter to measure his house power consumption.

 An Arduino would be the microcontroller but I wanted the meter to provide some form of data stream for a web based energy history. To make it an IoT, I a paired ESP8266 with it. I used both together because the Arduino ADC has a better resolution and has been tried and tested.

Nixie Tube Energy Meter – [Link]

 

WiFi-based Weather Forecast and Clock

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by soniktech.com:

This project is a stopgap on my way to building a ground-up “Internet of Things” base design around the ESP8266 SoC WiFi solution. I started by taking a few nixie tubes I’ve had lying around from a past project, and connecting them to a Nixie Power supply I found on ebay. After making sure they lit up, I wired the Nixies up to a HV5622 chip (which anyone who makes Nixie clocks should really consider for their designs).

WiFi-based Weather Forecast and Clock – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Wireless Nixie Thermometer

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by christian.ich.7 @ instructables.com:

The Target of this Project was to learn how to use different functions of the atmega:

• Connecting two Atmegas with a wireless connection
• Each Atmega has a Thermometer (DS1621) to read the actual temperature
• Use the sleep Mode of an Atmega
• Controlling a Nixie bargraph In-13

Wireless Nixie Thermometer – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Nixie Tube Clock

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by Pete Mills :

If you’ve poked around the internets where electronics hobbyists collect, it is likely that you are acutely aware of our incontrovertible affinity for building timekeeping clocks. It is similarly unlikely that you have been able to evade the plenitude of nixie tube based projects. There is a reason for this.

Nixie tubes are cool. They have great aesthetic appeal with their difficult-to-photograph, warm orange glow, and dem curvy numerals. They add an organic je ne sais quoi to a hobby with ostensibly digital design cues. Further, they pose technical challenges in the way of producing and switching the ~175 V DC needed to light each tube element. And as far as I am aware, there are no new nixie tubes being produced; as such, procurement can be a challenge unto itself. My N.O.S. nixies came from Russia thru Ebay, and only 3 were duds. Incidentally the seller replaced those 3, FOC.

Nixie Tube Clock – [Link]