Tag Archives: Nixie

Nixie Tube Energy Meter

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John Whittington decided to build a Nixie tube energy meter to measure his house power consumption.

 An Arduino would be the microcontroller but I wanted the meter to provide some form of data stream for a web based energy history. To make it an IoT, I a paired ESP8266 with it. I used both together because the Arduino ADC has a better resolution and has been tried and tested.

Nixie Tube Energy Meter – [Link]

 

WiFi-based Weather Forecast and Clock

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by soniktech.com:

This project is a stopgap on my way to building a ground-up “Internet of Things” base design around the ESP8266 SoC WiFi solution. I started by taking a few nixie tubes I’ve had lying around from a past project, and connecting them to a Nixie Power supply I found on ebay. After making sure they lit up, I wired the Nixies up to a HV5622 chip (which anyone who makes Nixie clocks should really consider for their designs).

WiFi-based Weather Forecast and Clock – [Link]

Wireless Nixie Thermometer

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by christian.ich.7 @ instructables.com:

The Target of this Project was to learn how to use different functions of the atmega:

• Connecting two Atmegas with a wireless connection
• Each Atmega has a Thermometer (DS1621) to read the actual temperature
• Use the sleep Mode of an Atmega
• Controlling a Nixie bargraph In-13

Wireless Nixie Thermometer – [Link]

Nixie Tube Clock

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by Pete Mills :

If you’ve poked around the internets where electronics hobbyists collect, it is likely that you are acutely aware of our incontrovertible affinity for building timekeeping clocks. It is similarly unlikely that you have been able to evade the plenitude of nixie tube based projects. There is a reason for this.

Nixie tubes are cool. They have great aesthetic appeal with their difficult-to-photograph, warm orange glow, and dem curvy numerals. They add an organic je ne sais quoi to a hobby with ostensibly digital design cues. Further, they pose technical challenges in the way of producing and switching the ~175 V DC needed to light each tube element. And as far as I am aware, there are no new nixie tubes being produced; as such, procurement can be a challenge unto itself. My N.O.S. nixies came from Russia thru Ebay, and only 3 were duds. Incidentally the seller replaced those 3, FOC.

Nixie Tube Clock – [Link]

Nixie Tube Clock

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by Peter @ petemills.blogspot.in:

Nixie tubes are cool. They have great aesthetic appeal with their difficult-to-photograph, warm orange glow, and dem curvy numerals. They add an organic je ne sais quoi to a hobby with ostensibly digital design cues. Further, they pose technical challenges in the way of producing and switching the ~175 V DC needed to light each tube element. And as far as I am aware, there are no new nixie tubes being produced; as such, procurement can be a challenge unto itself. My N.O.S. nixies came from Russia thru Ebay, and only 3 were duds. Incidentally the seller replaced those 3, FOC.

Nixie Tube Clock – [Link]

IN-12 Nixie Clock

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by tomasz.watorowski @ mightydevices.com:

A time has come for me to say ‘hello’ to the mid-XX century technology of Neon numerical displays, also known as Nixie tubes. Despite being quite hard to obtain and utilize I’ve decided to make a nice looking clock which (hopefully) would make a perfect Christmas present, and since the Christmas is all about sharing I thought It would be nice to go Open Source about it.

After few weeks of work I’ve ended up with neat single board design that makes the whole thing cheaper and easier to manufacture than the usual double board solutions (separate board for nixie lamps/divers, and another for microcontroller, power supply, high voltage dc/dc conversion, etc.). All of the circuitry is laid out on the back of the clock so it does not interfere with the old-school look of the Nixie displays.

IN-12 Nixie Clock – [Link]

 

IN-12 nixie clock

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by pinomelean @ instructables.com:

Ever since i discovered nixies i wanted to make a clock with them, but all the designs i found were for 4 or more nixies, required a custom power supply and a complicated driving system.

As the cheap guy i am, i didn’t want to buy lots of nixies or components to make such complicated circuits. And after ages looking for a simple clock design i came up with this page.

IN-12 nixie clock – [Link]

Flashing a Nixie with an Arduino

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Kevin Rye writes:

I’m in the very early stages of prototyping a nixie clock. I picked up some MJE340 power transistors to switch on some IN-3s. I can then use a digital pin on my Arduino to turn on the IN-3s through the transistor. I’ll then have myself a blinking colon for my nixie tube clock.

[via]

Flashing a Nixie with an Arduino – [Link]

Nixie tube clock

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Tom Cousins of DOAYEE made this DIY nixie tube clock:

Below is the schematic for the project, as you can see I’m using 6 IN12 nixie tubes, each with it’s own 74141 nixie tube driver. These drivers are great! They simply connect directly to the nixies and display whatever 4 bit binary number you give them (if you give them anything above 9 they blank the display – hence why I use the number 10 in my code to blank the nixies). Because they take in a simple 4 bit binary number, I can hook them directly up to some shift registers to drive them, in my case I used 3 74HC595 shift registers (available everywhere), because they can be “daisy chained

High Voltage Power Supply for Nixie Tube Projects

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Jan Rychter @ jan.rychter.com designed his own Nixie power supply that except the high voltage has two voltage outputs to power the logic circuitry, he writes:

This project is a HVPSU (High-Voltage Power Supply) that generates up to 220V from a 12V input. In addition to that, it also provides 2*Vout (so, up to 440V, for dekatrons), and two outputs for powering digital logic: 5V and 3.3V. The primary HV boost circuit reaches 88% efficiency when going from 12V to 185V at 55mA, with a 3% output ripple.

I designed it because I couldn’t find anything that would make sense for my Nixie projects. There are plenty of tiny power supply modules available on eBay, but most of them end up being impractical: no 3.3V (for my microcontroller) and 5V (for my 74141 nixie drivers), no mounting holes, no >400V output for powering dekatrons. Some supplies make a token gesture towards practicality by sticking a 7805 on the same board, but you quickly find out that the current draw of 6×74141 is enough to require a large heat sink on a 12V-powered 7805 (one 74141 consumes 12.5mA!). This means that instead of a single-board power supply you end up routing your input power all over the place, implementing your power supply in several places.

High Voltage Power Supply for Nixie Tube Projects – [Link]