Tag Archives: OLED

Pixel 2.0, Arduino Zero-Like Board With Smart Display

The Pixel is an Arduino-compatible smart display, combining a 32-bit Cortex M0+ MCU with 32K of RAM, a 1.5″ 128×128 color OLED screen, and a microSD slot all in one package.

This is Rabid Prototypes’ second iteration of Pixel, which originally raised nearly $10,000 on Kickstarter back in 2015. The board offers a number of potential use cases, ranging from wearable devices, to sensor data monitors, to retro video game consoles.

The Pixel is compatible with Arduino’s SPI and SD libraries, as well as Adafruit’s graphics library, which provides functions for blitting images, drawing primitives like lines and circles, and even includes bitmapped font support.

Additionally, if you ever need to modify the fuses or bootloader, the Pixel features a standard SWD header that can be used with Microchip’s Atmel-ICE development tool.

Here are the technical specifications of Pixel:

  • Microcontroller: Atmel ATSAMD21G18 ARM Cortex M0+
  • Clock speed: 48 MHz
  • Operating voltage: 3.3V
  • I/O pin limits: 3.3V, 7 mA
  • Digital I/O pins: 14, with 12 PWM
  • Analog input pins: 6, 12-bit ADC channels
  • Analog output pins: 1, 10-bit DAC
  • Flash memory: 256 KB
  • SRAM: 32 KB
  • Voltage regulator: 3.7V – 5.5V input / 3.3V, 300mA output
  • PCB Dimensions: 1.8 x 1.8″ (46mm x 46mm)
  • Display : 128×128 16-bit color 1.5″ (38mm) OLED w/ SSD1351 driver

Pixel is now live on Kickstarter! you can get your own Pixel 2.0 for $75 or two for only $135. The campaign still has 12 days to go, check its video to know further details about Pixel 2.0:

Source: Hackster Blog

 

0.91 inch OLED display targets wearables

Winstar’s WEO012832F is a small OLED display featuring 128×32 pixels in a 0.91 inch diagonal screen, suitable for wearable devices. by Julien Happich @ edn-europe.com:

The WEO012832F module comes with a built-in SSD1306BZ controller IC, it supports an I 2C interface and a 14-pin FPC pinout.  Standard emitting colours for the WEO012832F are available in white, sky blue and yellow. The WEO012832F features a COG structure OLED display, the built-in voltage generation only requires a single 3V power supply. This lightweight 30.0×11.5×1.45mm OLED module can operate at temperatures from -40℃ to +80℃.

0.91 inch OLED display targets wearables – [Link]

Thermometer That Pushes Arduino to Its Limits

by gundolf @ instructables.com:

Starting playing with Arduino seems simple enough. You can find all sorts of tutorials, instructables, wiring and code examples for pretty much every sensor, component, or module available. So far so good. But when the time comes for building a more complex device, the troubles start. The tutorials for adding multiple modules to Arduino and then working with them efficiently are very scarce. Therefore, with this instructable, I will try to help with just that. So here comes the Arduino thermometer/hygrometer with a GUI, designed to push Arduino to its limits.

Thermometer That Pushes Arduino to Its Limits – [Link]

Bitmap graphics on an Arduino Touch Screen and other top Arduino Displays

In this video tutorial educ8s.tv shows us how to load bitmap graphics in our Arduino Touch Screen projects using Adafruit’s GFX library.

The procedure that I am going to describe works with all the color displays that are supported by Adafruit’s GFX library and by the displays that use the TFTLCD library from Adafruit with a small modification. So from the displays I own I can use the color OLED display, the 1.8” ST7735 color TFT display, the 2.8” Color Touch Screen that I reviewed a few weeks ago and the 3.5” Color TFT display. You can find links for all the displays below.

Bitmap graphics on an Arduino Touch Screen and other top Arduino Displays [Link]

3 MilliWatt-Consumption Data Glasses

Data glasses display information to the eye without interfering with the wearer‘s vision but they run energy down very quickly due to the consumption of electronics while processing video images and data. Researchers at  Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP had developed a new data glass that has low-power consumption. Received using a radio link, the glasses is able to display images to the wearer while his/her hands are free.

These glasses also goes bright even the power is somehow low thanks to the OLEDs embedded to a silicon semiconductor which controls the individual pixels. Plus, they have the ability to perceive light from the environment around not only emit it.

© Photo Fraunhofer FEP

Another reason to high power consumption in data glasses is loading the data stream, but FEP researchers have came up with a new way to reduce it by changing only objects that are changed and keep the constant ones,

“We now control the chip so that the entire video image is not constantly renewed, rather only that part of the display in which something changes.” – Project manager Philipp Wartenberg “For example, if an actor runs through a room in a movie, only his position changes, not the background. In applications such as a navigation system for cyclists, in which only arrows or metre information is displayed, it is unnecessary in any case to constantly renew the whole picture, to put it simply, we have now adapted the circuit so that it only lets through that portion of the data stream which changes.”

FEP data glasses requires an output of 2-3 milliWatts, a fraction of the output need for ordinary displays – around 200 milliWatts.

The new display was presented at the electronica trade fair in Munich on November 08-11, 2016 and its developers hope to see it used by athletes and private clients. You can read more about it at the press release.

A LEGO-Compatible Digital Weather Billboard

Internet of LEGO “IoL” is an interactive LEGO city built and designed by Cory Guynn, a cloud computing and IoT enthusiast. This project combines computer and electronics  engineering with our favorite childhood toy, LEGO!

Through the IoL blog, Cory shares a collection of circuit projects, coding examples, and tutorials which use Arduino, Raspberry Pi, NodeJS, Node-RED, and LEGO.

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A recently added project is a digital billboard that broadcasts the weather information from IoL local weather station. It uses a Raspberry Pi running Node-RED to collect weather data from the local station and display it on an OLED screen powered by an ESP8266.

The hardware materials needed for this project:

  1. Raspberry Pi
  2. WeMos D1 mini
  3. OLED 128×64 I2C screen
  4. 2x LEDs
  5. 2x 220 ohm resistors
  6. Breadboard and wires
  7. LEGO bricks!

And the required software:

WeMos D1 mini is a cheap mini wifi board based on ESP8266 and compatible with Arduino and NodeMCU. It has 11 digital I/O pins that support PWM, I2C, and interrupts, and has only one analog input with a microUSB connector. The WeMos D1 is available for only $4 and is supported by many shields.

WeMos D1 mini top and bottom faces
WeMos D1 mini top and bottom faces

The 128X64 OLED is about 1.3″ display, it is very readable due to its high contrast. This display is made of 128×64 individual white OLED pixels, each one is turned on or off by the controller chip. No backlight is required because the display makes its own light, which reduces the power required to run the OLED.

Adafruit Monochrome 1.3" 128x64 OLED graphic display
Adafruit Monochrome 1.3″ 128×64 OLED graphic display

OLED’s driver chip, SSD1306 can communicate in two ways: I2C or SPI. The OLED itself require a 3.3V power supply and 3.3V logic levels for communication.

The display uses I2C connection at this project, so you will need to solder the two jumpers (SJ1/2) on the back of the OLED, then use the ‘Data’ pin as ‘I2C SDA’ pin and ‘CLK’ pin as ‘I2C SCL’. The WeMos D1, OLED, LEDs, and resistors are connected as shown in the figure.

billboard-fritzing

To simplify configuring WeMos D1, a special firmware called “ESPEasy” has been used. It is a free and open-source web configurable software framework for IoT, which allows the device to be configured using the web browser instead of writing codes.

ESPEasy can be uploaded to the WeMos D1 using the Arduino IDE by installing the ESP8266 board support from Boards Manager, and then uploading the ESPEasy firmware as described in this tutorial.

ESPEasy Firmware on Arduino IDE
ESPEasy Firmware on Arduino IDE

MQTT is a lightweight machine-to-machine publish/subscription messaging protocol. It works like Twitter where each device will subscribe and/or publish to a topic, much like a #hashtag, and the payload will then contain the data being transmitted.

Mosquitto is a free open source broker that works perfectly on a Raspberry Pi. It is a MQTT server manages the MQTT message flow, and connects with all devices.

The last step is configuring the Raspberry Pi on the weather station for sending the information to the billboard. An easy way for that is using Node-Red, a visual tool for wiring together hardware devices, APIs and online services for IoT applications.

Node-Red is pre-installed on the Raspbian Jessie image. Run the software and download this flow. It will accept an MQTT message on the topic “/sensors/iolcity/weather/#” and transmit it to the WeMos on the topic “/billboard/cmd”. Function nodes will format the message using JavaScript.

Node-RED Billboard MQTT Flow
Node-RED Billboard MQTT Flow

You can use it with your own weather station or any other sources of data, just change the MQTT input nodes to match your topics. To build a weather station check this IoL project and this ChipKIT-based station. Alternatively, you could get weather data using the Weather Underground service with the Node-RED node.

Further information and detailed description are available at the original project page.

CHIP Computer Project: CPU Temperature Monitor with OLED display SSD1306

Today educ8s.tv is going to connect an OLED display to the CHIP 9$ computer in order to monitor its CPU temperature in real time.

I received the CHIP single board computer about a year ago. It is an impressive board, it costs $9 and it offers a 1GHz CPU, 256MB of RAM wifi Bluetooth and many more things. You can watch my review of the CHIP computer by clicking on the card here. As you can see the CHIP computer is a lot smaller than the Raspberry Pi 3 board and of course it costs a lot less. One year later, the software developed for the CHIP computer is mature and we can easily build some projects with it

CHIP Computer Project: CPU Temperature Monitor with OLED display SSD1306 – [Link]

Tiny OLED PC Performance Monitor

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Rupert Hirst build a tiny OLED PC performance monitor based on Psyrax’s serial monitor. The display monitors CPU and GPU temperature and activity etc. He writes:

After a recent purchase of a Nvidia GTX1080 graphics card, 4k monitor plus Doom(2016), I thought it would be great to see some external telemetry… from my exorbitant purchase.
Then, I Stumbled upon on Psyrax’s “Serialmonitor” GitHub repository! Armed with an Arduino ProMicro plus a 128×64 pixel OLED display, I compiled the source code. After compiling Psyrax’s windows application in Visual Studio, I got to work.

Tiny OLED PC Performance Monitor – [Link]

RFID Tutorial with an Arduino Uno and an OLED display

educ8s.tv uploaded a new video on a RFID Arduino Tutorial:

Today we are going to build a very interesting project. For the first time we are going to use RFID tags with Arduino. I have built a simple project which reads the Unique ID (UID) of each RFID tag we place close to the reader and displays it on this OLED display. If the UID of the tag is equal to a predefined value that is stored in Arduino’s memory, then in the display we are going to see the “Unlocked” message. If the Unique ID of the card is not equal to the predefined value, the Unlock message won’t appear. Cool isn’t it?

RFID Tutorial with an Arduino Uno and an OLED display [Link]

DIY Altimeter using a NEO UBLOX GPS module and a Color OLED

In this video educ8s.tv is going to build a DIY Altimeter using the UBLOX NEO-6M GPS module along with a color OLED display with the SSD1331 driver.

About a year ago, I built some GPS projects using this GPS shield. This shield is great but unfortunately it is no longer available for sale. Also its size is big so it is not ideal for smaller projects. So, while searching on Banggood.com I discovered this tiny GPS module. It costs around $16 and Banggood.com was kind enough to send me a sample unit in order to test it

DIY Altimeter using a NEO UBLOX GPS module and a Color OLED – [Link]