Tag Archives: OLED

Heart-rate monitor on a small OLED display with MicroPython

By Martin Fitzpatrick @ martinfitzpatrick.name show us how to build the micro display heart-rate monitor.

Pulse sensors have become popular due to their use in health-monitors like the Fitbit. The sensors used are cheap, simple and pretty reliable at getting a reasonable indication of heart rate in daily use. They work by sensing the change in light absorption or reflection by blood as it pulses through your arteries — a technique jauntily named photoplethysmography (PPG). The rising and falling light signal can be used to identify the pulse, and subsequently calculate heart rate.

Heart-rate monitor on a small OLED display with MicroPython – [Link]

Tiny Graphics Library for ATtiny85 and SH1106 OLED Display

David Johnson-Davies published another great tutorial on how to use the Tiny Graphics Library to plot the outside temperature over 24 hours on a 128×64 OLED display using an ATtiny85.

This small graphics library provides point, line, and character plotting commands for use with an I2C 128×64 OLED display on an ATtiny85.

It supports processors with limited RAM by avoiding the need for a display buffer, and works with I2C OLED displays based on the SH1106 driver chip. These are available for a few dollars from a number of Chinese suppliers.

To demonstrate the graphics library I’ve written a simple application to measure the temperature every 15 minutes over a 24-hour period and display it as a live chart.

Tiny Graphics Library for ATtiny85 – [Link]

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Displaying Customized Graphics on OLED display using Arduino

One thing we all always wish we could do when using any display is to load our own custom graphics, be it a logo, gif etc. In today’s tutorial we will show how to do just that on an OLED display using an Arduino.

OLED (organic light-emitting diode) display is a display based on light-emitting diode (LED) in which the emissive electroluminescent layer is a film of organic compound that emits light in response to an electric current. This layer of organic semiconductor is situated between two electrodes; typically, at least one of these electrodes is transparent. OLEDs are used to create digital displays in devices such as television screens, computer monitors, portable systems such as mobile phones, handheld game consoles, and PDAs. OLED displays do not require a backlight because they emit visible light and can thus, display deep black levels and be thinner and lighter than a liquid crystal display (LCD).

Displaying Customized Graphics on OLED display using Arduino – [Link]

eVscope – Reaching for the stars as never before

Humanity has always been trying to reach for the stars, this lead to huge scientific developments that got the man into the moon, rovers into mars and a lot more. NASA often unveils photographs of space objects with bright colors and high definition, but these photos are taken using millions of dollars in telescopes and image software. Most amateur telescopes give blurry, opaque images (if you get to see anything at all). As a result, astronomy amateurs are often disappointed because of their high expectations regarding what they would see in the telescope. The company Unistellar optics combined two different technics to create a telescope that could fulfill hobbyist expectations.

As only a very small amount of light from stellar objects reaches earth, it’s important to collect as much light as possible which can be done with a lens (or mirror with a large diameter), or by exposing a photographic film for a long period of time. Nowadays, astronomers don´t use photographic film anymore because electronic cameras can take hundreds of pictures and overlap them to make one bright picture. However, the equipment to do all this can be expensive (professional camera, good telescope, mirrors with huge diameters), and they can also be complicated because of the need for a very dark sky, certain weather etc.

The eVscope (enhanced vision) made by Unistellar optics has a built in high quality image sensor, and instead of lenses an eye piece with an OLED display is used. Additionally, it has a computer controlled mount and drive, all in modest dimensions. It costs about 1300 dollars and works by taking short exposures and staking them in real time to simulate a larger instrument.

This device has already been tried by many amateur astronomers, and university students with very positive results. Also, the eVscope has an autonomous field detection which makes it easy for learners to pinpoint specific places, and with the smartphone connection capabilities people can save and share their pictures, and unlike other telescopes it is portable and autonomous. Currently, Unistellar optics has a Kickstarter campaign for this product with more than 2000 backers. eVscope is 100 times more powerful than a classical telescope and could change the way people see the sky and learn about astronomy.

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Arduino Breathalyzer Using MQ3 Gas sensor and OLED Display

A breathalyzer is a generalized trademarked name for devices used for determining blood alcohol content from a breath sample. This means the device can detect from your breadth, the amount of alcohol you have taken. This device becomes very useful when you consider several cases of accidents caused by drunk driving. With this device, you can easily warn the driver of a car when he/she is too drunk to drive a car. It is important to note that this project is not accurate enough to replace the standard breathalyzer and you shouldn’t drink and drive.

For this project, we will be using the MQ3 alcohol sensor. It is a cheap semiconductor sensor capable of detecting the presence of alcohol in air at concentrations between the value 0.05 mg/L to 10 mg/L. The sensor uses a chemical reaction to determine alcohol level and the primary sensing element in the sensor is SnO2, the conductivity of SnO2 is low in clean air but increases as the concentration of alcohol gas in air (breath) increases. It has high sensitivity to alcohol and has a good resistance to disturbances and noise from things like smoke and gasoline.

Arduino Breathalyzer Using MQ3 Gas sensor and OLED Display – [Link]

Four-Channel Thermometer on OLED display

David Johnson-Davies @ technoblogy.com build a four-channel thermometer that monitors the temperature at four temperature sensors, and gives a continuous readout on a small 128×32 OLED display. It’s a useful project for various applications like PSU or PC monitoring. The article describes 1-wire and code in details.

It could be used in any application where you want to monitor multiple temperatures, such as in controlling a greenhouse, checking the output transistors in a power amplifier, monitoring key points in an overclocked gaming PC, monitoring the chips on a Raspberry Pi, or checking the temperature in different rooms in a home.

Four-Channel Thermometer on OLED display – [Link]

ESP32 NTP OLED clock

@ blog.danman.eu build a OLED display NTP clock and document his process on his blog:

As a first project with my new ESP32 module with OLED display I chose to build OLED clock. I thought I’ll just find some existing code, upload it and it’s done. There are a few such projects for ESP8266 in NodeMCU. So I started with NodeMCU upload.

ESP32 NTP OLED clock – [Link]

GAME BYTE – Retro gaming system

Game Byte the open source gaming system for creating, sharing, and playing games is live on kickstarter. Over 100 free games. Make your own games.

Game Byte is an open source gaming system for creating, sharing, and playing games. It’s SMALL! About the size of a credit card and fits in your pocket so you can take it with you wherever you go. You can play one of the over 100 free games available or learn how to create your own. The built in microSD card slot allows you to store your games on an SD card without plugging into a computer.

Digital UV-meter with OLED Display

@ instructables.com build a nice VU meter using Arduino and an OLED display.

Hello, instructable. Today I will tell you how to make a simple digital VU meter (sound level meter) using Arduino and OLED displays and 2 resistors by yourself (DIY). The device is quite simple, for beginners it will be a rewarding experience.

Digital UV-meter with OLED Display – [Link]

ATtiny85 Tiny OLED Watch

An ATtiny85 and a 64×48 OLED display hand clock:

This is the third in my series of minimalist watches based on the ATtiny85. This version displays the time by drawing an analogue watch face on a miniature 64×48 OLED display. It uses a separate crystal-controlled low-power RTC chip to keep time to within a few seconds a month, and puts the processor and display to sleep when not showing the time to give a battery life of over a year.

ATtiny85 Tiny OLED Watch – [Link]

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