Tag Archives: Oscilloscope

ICP12 USBSTICK, A New Tool for Signals Control & Monitoring

iCircuit Technologies had produced the iCP12 usbStick, a mini size 28 pin USB PIC IO development board and a good tool for signal monitoring (as oscilloscope), data acquisition and circuit troubleshooting at 1mSec/Samples period.

The iCP12 usbStick is a PIC18F2550 based USB development board that comes preloaded with Microchip’s USB HID bootloader which allows users to upload an application firmware directly through a PC’s USB port without any external programmer. It provides access to its I/O pins through 0.1″ pitch headers. A slide switch is also provided on board to select the operation of the board in Bootloader or Normal mode.

The features of iCP12 are listed as following:

  • Mini size, easy interfacing, high performance and user friendly device
  • Used with PIC18F2553 28-Pin Flash USB PIC MCU
  • Excellent flexibility that allows user to expand the board with plug and play modules
  • Peripheral Features:
    • 13x IO Port (6x 12bit ADC pins, 2x 10 bit PWM/Freq/DAC pins)
    • Serial port emulation (UART Baud Rates: 300 bps to 115.2 kbps)
    • Supported operating systems (32bit/64bit): Windows XP ,Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, Linux, Mac OS X and Raspberry Pi
    • Maximum Voltage: 5Vdc
    • 100mA current output at VDD pin with over-current protection
    • 20MHz oscillator
    • Green LED – power on indicator
    • 2x LEDs (Green, Red) – status indicator
    • ICSP Connector – on-board PIC programming
    • Switch Mode Selection – Boot or Normal mode

The iCP12 usbStick board is shipped with a preloaded data acquisition firmware that emulates as a virtual COM port to PC. Thereafter, the communication between the PC and usbStick is serial. The firmware also supports basic I/O control and data logging feature. They provide a PC application named SmartDAQ that is specially developed to communicate with the usbStick and control its I/O pins, PWM outputs, and record ADC inputs.

SmartDAQ has a very friendly GUI with real-time waveform displays for 6 analog input channels. The time and voltage axes scales are adjustable. SmartDAQ can log the ADC data in both text and graphic form concurrently. One can utilize this feature to construct a low-cost data acquisition system for monitoring multiple analog sensor outputs such as temperature, accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetic field sensor, etc.

SmartDAQ v1.3 Features:

  • Sampling channel: 6x Analogs (12bits ADC/1mV Resolution) + 7x Digitals (Input/Output)
  • Maximum Sampling rate: 1KHz or 1mSec/Samples
  • Sampling voltage: 0V – 5V (scalable graph) at 5mV Resolution
  • Sampling period:
  • mSec: 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500
  • Sec: 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30
  • Min: 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60
  • Trigger Mode: Larger [>], Smaller [<], Positive edge [↑], Negative edge [↓]
  • Sampling Mode: Continuous, Single
  • Logging Function:
  • Save Format: Text, Graphic, Both
  • Start Time: Normal, Once Trigger, 24-Hour Clock (Auto Run)
  • End Time: Unlimited, Data Size, 24-Hour Clock (Auto Stop)
  • Recorded Data format: Graphic | text | excel

iCP12 is available with the PIC18F2550 for $15, and with the PIC18F2553 for $24.5. You can order it through the official page where you can also get more details about iCP12 and its source files.

You can also see this product preview to know more about its functionality.

Keysight adds 50/70/100 MHz oscilloscopes for educators, small labs

Martin Rowe @ edn.com writes:

Taking aim at rivals Rigol and Tektronix, Keysight Technologies has introduced a series of four oscilloscopes aimed at educators, small labs, and perhaps individuals. The InfiniiVision 1000 X-Series of two-channel oscilloscopes has bandwidths of 50 MHz, 70 MHz, and 100 MHz (upgradeable from 70 MHz with a software key) with prices starting at $449 (see table).

Keysight adds 50/70/100 MHz oscilloscopes for educators, small labs – [Link]

HPS140MK2, The New Handheld Oscilloscope

Velleman Inc., a producer and a distributor of electronics, has produced a new handheld oscilloscope with the same power of its HPS140, but with smaller size and modern design.

HPS140MK2 is a 11.4 x 6.8 x 2.2 cm versatile component tester that fits in your pocket. This small oscilloscope features a real time 40 MS/s sampling rate with up to 10 MHz bandwidth and 0.1 mV sensitivity.

HPS140MK2 features:

  • 40 Mega samples/sec in real time
  • Bandwidth up to 10 MHz
  • Full auto range option
  • Sensitivity down to 0.1 mV
  • Signal markers for amplitude and time
  • Memory hold function
  • Direct audio power measurement

The device is powered by 4 AAA batteries. On the front panel you can find four buttons; menu, up, down, and hold. The display is used to menu options and received signal. On the top side you will find an on/off switch and a BNC input connector that can accept maximum input of 100Vp.On the bottom side there is an X10 probe test signal.

Specifications:

  • Bandwidth: up to 10 MHz (-3dB or -4dB at selected ranges)
  • Input range: 1 mV to 20 V / division in 14 steps
  • Input coupling: DC, AC and GND
  • Real-time sample rate up to 40 MS/s
  • AD resolution: 8 bits
  • Time base: 250 ns to 1 h per division
  • Auto set-up function (or manual)
  • Probe x10 readout option
  • Readouts: DC, AC + DC,True RMS, dBm, Vpp, Min-Max. (±2.5%)
  • Audio power measurement from 2 to 32 ohms
  • Hold & store function
  • Time and voltage markers readout
  • Max. 100 Vp AC + DC
  • Monochrome OLED
  • Power supply: 4 x 1.5 V AAA batteries (not incl.)
  • Operating time: up to 8 hours on quality Alkaline batteries
  • Dimensions: 114 x 68 x 22 mm
  • Weight: 166 gr
  • Current consumption: max. 150 mA

The product is available for $150 on Velleman store. Additional parts will be available soon including component tester ‘HPS141’ to receive all useful information about resistors, transistors, diodes and more, including their pin out identification, and the ‘HPSP1’ protective pouch.

RELATED POSTS

DIY Generic Curve Tracer

Stoneslice has shared a Curve Tracer tutorial on Youtube that uses an X Y mode Oscilloscope to test components and their characteristics. Using the on-board Phase Shift Oscillator to provide the test signal, passive and active parts can be tested.

These are the  components needed to build the project:

  • 1 x NPN Switching Transistor
  • 1 x 1K Resistor
  • 1 x 4.7K Resistor
  • 1 x 8.2K Resistor
  • 2 x 10K Resistor
  • 1 x 2M Resistor
  • 3 x 4.7nF Capacitor
  • 1 x 1uF Electrolytic Capacitor
  • 1 x DPDT Switch
  • 4 x Sockets
  • 4 x Test points

In this video Stoneslice demonstrates the project sharing all the technical details and information needed, check it out:

Inspired by Stoneslice’s tutorial, Paul Gallagher (tardate) has developed further on the Curve Tracer by using a simple DC Powered oscillator to drive a test signal across the device under test, instead of relying on an AC power supply. Paul also added a DPDT switch to toggle and compare two devices under test.

X-Y signals are plotted on an oscilloscope to visualise the characteristic curve for the component.

  • X is the ground-referenced voltage at the anode of the device under test (DUT)
  • Y is the voltage across the resistor at the cathode of the DUT, which is proportional to the current flowing through the DUT.

Paul tested multiple components like resistors, diodes and capacitors demonstrating the charging and discharging cycles.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Below is the schematics of Paul’s circuit.

Paul has launched LittleArduinoProjects series, a collection of electronics projects often involving an Arduino,  and this project’s number is 245! Check his two technical blogs: LittleArduinoProjects, and LittleCodingKata – where he tests tools and talks about software development topics.

Further details about this Curve Tracer are available at Github, where you can find schematic, detailed tutorials, the project snapshots in action and resources.

IkaScope – a new wireless oscilloscope probe

ikalogic.com launched “IkaScope” a new wireless oscilloscope probe that is able to make measurements directly on your mobile phone or your laptop. IkaScope transfers measured signals over high speed wifi connection and it will remember your home or office access points. It will work with iOS, Android and Windows devices (OSx will also be supported).

Specifications

  • Input range 10 mV/div. → 10 V/divMaximum input voltage 80 Vpp
  • Bandwidth 25 MHz
  • Timebase 100 ns/div → 10 s/div
  • Input impedance 1MΩ
  • Input Coupling AC, DC, GND
  • Trigger Rising or falling slopes
  • Digital specifications
  • Sampling rate 200 MSPS
  • Resolution 8-bits
  • Buffer 4K pts (4 * 1K Pts)1

IkaScope is a wireless oscilloscope probe, all contained in an ergonomic stylus. It uses a wifi connection to transfer signals to be displayed on any connected screen (Laptop, Smart-phone, Tablet or Desktop Computer). It’s equipped with a battery that can be recharged via any USB port. Being battery operated, IkaScope always provides 4000V+ galvanic isolation from power mains (even when being recharged).

IkaScope – a new wireless oscilloscope probe – [Link]

FFTs and oscilloscopes: A practical guide

fft_fig1_600x375

Arthur Pini @ edn.com published a guide on how to use FFT found in most modern oscilloscopes.

The FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) first appeared when microprocessors entered commercial design in the 1970s. Today almost every oscilloscope from high-priced laboratory models to the lowest-priced hobby models offer FFT analysis. The FFT is a powerful tool, but using it effectively requires some study. I’ll show you how to set up and use the FFT effectively. We’ll skip the technical description of the FFT, because its already implemented in the instruments. Instead I’ll focus on the practical aspect of using this great tool.

FFTs and oscilloscopes: A practical guide – [Link]

Measuring the speed of light with electronics

The speed of light in vacuum is a well-known universal constant and is considered to be the nature’s ultimate speed limit. No matter, energy, and information can travel faster than this speed. The speed of light has always been a topic of great interest and significance throughout history. In the course of measuring the speed of light, scientists have explored numerous ingenious approaches from analyzing the motion of heavenly bodies to artificial quantitative measurements in the laboratory. Michael Gallant describes a very simple approach of measuring this physical constant using an infrared LED, a photodiode circuit, and an oscilloscope. The premise of this method is to allow an infrared beam to travel different distances and then compute the time delay (Δt) between them using the oscilloscope. By measuring the difference in the distances (Δd), the speed of light can be calculated as the ratio of Δd and Δt.

IR Light source
IR Light source

The following diagram describes the setup he used. A Vishay 870 nm IR LED (TSFF5210) generates an IR pulse beam that splits into two beams (L1a and L0) through a beamsplitter (BS). L0 is directly focused onto the photodiode (Pd) using a lens. The L1a beam gets reflected off a mirror, travels along the path L1b, and then focused using a different lens onto the same photodiode. You can see the net path difference between the two beams before they hit the photodiode is (L1a+L1b – L0). If the original IR pulse is kept adequately short, the two optical pulses detected by the photodiode will not overlap in time. An oscilloscope of sufficient bandwidth can therefore reveal the time difference between the two pulses. The photodetector used in this setup was Vishay BPV10 high speed Si pin type with a bandwidth of 200 MHz. The photodiode signal is amplified using an AD8001 Opamp based preamplifier circuit with a gain of 35 (31 dB) and BW of 50 MHz.

Experimental setup for measuring the speed of light
Experimental setup for measuring the speed of light

Michael measured the path difference of the two beams to be 1851 cm and the difference in the time of flight to be 62 nanoseconds from the oscilloscope. This results in the measured speed of light to be 298548387 m/s, which is remarkably accurate for such a simple setup.

Time difference between the arrival of the two pulses can be seen on the oscilloscope
Time difference between the arrival of the two pulses can be seen on the oscilloscope

Find more about this project.

EspoTek Labrador – Oscilloscope, Signal generator, Power supply in one tiny board

lab-product-2_jpg_project-body

EspoTek Labrador is a small, portable, USB-connected electronics lab-on-a-board that includes an oscilloscope, waveform generator, power supply, logic analyzer, and multimeter.

The EspoTek Labrador plugs directly into a solderless breadboard and connects to any Windows, Mac, or Linux computer via microUSB. A custom software interface lets you see and interact with your waveforms on-screen. Careful planning and a lot of work has been put into making the interface intuitive for those new to electronics, while keeping it powerful for those familiar with the instruments. Experienced engineers, don’t fear – you can do things like manually adjust the ADC gain and UART parameters. These kinds of function have just been moved away from the main screen, keeping things clean and simple for newer users.

EspoTek Labrador – Oscilloscope, Signal generator, Power supply in one tiny board – [Link]

Siglent oscilloscope SDS1102X review

20160726143721_SDS1102X
Harry Baggen @ elektormagazine.com reviews the Siglent SDS1102X oscilloscope.
Before we take a look at the instrument itself, I would like to say something about the characteristics of an oscilloscope for ‘small users’. What do you really need for your daily tasks? Even the cheapest models from Chinese manufacturers already have a sample rate of 500 MS/s or 1 GS/s, much more than what the typical electronics engineer needs. More important is the input bandwidth, which is an indication of the quality of the analog input stage, which, for example, could be 50 or 100 MHz. Most electronic engineers work on circuits with frequencies up to a few megahertz and then a simple USB scope with a sample rate of 100 MS/s and an input bandwidth of 10 MHz is already more than sufficient.

Siglent oscilloscope SDS1102X review – [Link]

Review: Siglent SDS 2304X oscilloscope

Siglent_SDS_2304A_vs_Keysight_MSOX_3054A

Jack Ganssle @ embedded.com reviews the Siglent SDS 2304X oscilloscope.

I’ve had a Siglent SDS1102CML two channel 100 MHz bench scope here for the last two years. I demand a lot from my test equipment so had low expectations when it arrived. After all, how good can a $359 unit be? Turns out, quite a good for the price. I reviewed it here. But the screen is smaller than most modern pro scopes with lower resolution than many would like. And 100 MHz just doesn’t cut it for a lot of applications. I figured Siglent was positioning itself at the low end of the market.

Review: Siglent SDS 2304X oscilloscope – [Link]