Tag Archives: PCB

Kristall 511 solder wire won´t dirt your PCB

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Innovative flux and a high qualty alloy provide to Stannol Kristall 511 solder wire excellent processing properties with a minimum of clean transprarent residues.

You, who are at production of electronic devices, know, how important is a choice of a suitable solder. A designer of a given device might not focus on a solder used at soldering of the first protoype, bu tin a production it will manifest itself – sooner or later. Not that some solder would be miraculous and otherone unusable, but each one is suitable for something else.Similarly lie in other segments, even here are some exceptions, when by using the newest materials and know-how from development of solders exist types suitable for multiple applications. One of them is solder Kristall511 Ecoloy with an innovative flux based on synthetic resins. The result is a small spatter and clean, transparent residues, which don´t influence electrical properties of a PCB, i.e. they belong to a “No clean” category – they can stay on a PCB withot cleaning. Kristall 511 is a considerably active solder and it shows its strength even at surfaces with not that optimal solderability and also there, where it´s necessary to solder quickly (for example components that are exceptionally sensitive to temperature). KRISTALL 511 was developed for automated soldering of SMT components, as well as for hand soldering and rework.

This way Stannol, as a producer with rich experience in development of solders (from 1920), produced a combinatio of an alloy+flux with properties meeting majority of requirements of production:

  • small amount of transparent residues
  • excellent spreading even at poorly solderable sorfaces (copper, brass, nickel,…)
  • highly active
  • electrically safe residues
  • low spitting
  • mild odour and small amount of fumes

On stock we have two novelties KRISTALL 511 Sn95,5Ag3,8Cu0,7 (593132) (diameter 1mm, 500g) and KRISTALL 511 Sn96,5Ag3,0Cu0,5 (810050) (diameter 1mm, 500g) solder wires. Technical details can be found in the Kristall_511 datasheet.


Kristall 511 solder wire won’t dirt your PCB – [Link]

Homemade x-ray inspector reveals PCB secrets

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John McMaster has written an article detailing his homemade x-ray scanner:

In some previous posts I talked about getting an x-ray head working, reverse engineering an x-ray sensor, and working with LinuxCNC. In this post I put them all together so that I can take a bunch of x-ray snapshots across an entire PCB. This allows me to more quickly reverse engineer PCBs.

Homemade x-ray inspector reveals PCB secrets – [Link]

Making PCBs with CNC

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Rui written an article on how to build your own PCBs using a CNC machine. Rui Cabral writes:

The PCB manufacturing method i used before buying my CNC machine was the lithography method and worked as follows:

First i printed the board design on an acetate sheet.

This sheet was placed over a pcb with a light sensitive coat and placed under UV light for several minutes.

The pcb was then immersed in a solution of caustic soda to remove the photo sensitive material that was “damaged” with the UV light.

The pcb was then immersed in a Ferric Chloride solution to remove the copper.

After the copper being removed i then washed the pcb to remove the chemicals and then i needed to cut the plate and finally drill the pads.

Making PCBs with CNC – [Link]

More awesome DoorBell control

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Felix of LowPowerLab posted an update on his DoorBell Mote project:

My first DoorBell Mote prototype was working nicely and it allowed monitoring the door bell (while also triggering it remotely – toddlers love it). But I wanted more. On weekends the family likes to get a well deserved nap during the day and often those pesky solicitors ring the bell and wake everyone up. So naturally the doorbell has to be disabled also, without major effort or any disconnected wires. Sounds like the perfect addition to the Door Bell Mote. So I made a new revision and a proper PCB for this, below is the schematic with the changes and the proto PCB from OSHPark. Actually I made more changes to the schematic after putting together the PCB, so there are some differences. I’ve tried a LTV814H optocoupler for AC detection instead of the more expensive H11AA11, it works just as well, but both can be used on this PCB

More awesome DoorBell control – [Link]

How to Build PCB Online using Web Based EDA Tools

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by circuitstoday.com:

This is a brief review of the capabilities and ease of use of three of the most interesting, innovative and downright disruptive web-based EDA tools:

EasyEDA
Upverter
Autodesk 123D Circuits (formerly Circuits.io)

The same simple astable multivibrator circuit is entered into each tool and the design process followed through simulation (where offered), to PCB layout and Gerber download.

How to Build PCB Online using Web Based EDA Tools – [Link]

EAGLE BOM generation script

bom-gen_001Dilshan Jayakody writes [via]:

This is a quick post about EAGLE parts list generation script which I was written to replace existing “part2html.ulp”. This script generates more organized and detailed BOM HTML file and it can directly replace “part2html.ulp”.

This script is tested with EAGLE 6.6.0, but it can also work with older versions of EAGLE software.
This script is available to download at github with usage details.

EAGLE BOM generation script – [Link]

DIY Double Sided 60W LED UV Radiation Unit With Vacuum Pump

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Kurt Skauen writes:

This is a description of how I designed and built my UV exposure box. After experimenting a bit with dry-laminate photo-resist and liquid UV hardened solder mask I decided to stop trying to improve my toner transfer technique and rather build a proper UV radiation unit for making printed circuit boards.

I wanted it to be powerful and compact so I decided to use UV LEDs as the UV source. The preferred wavelength for the LEDs would probably be 365nm, but those LEDs turned out to be hard to find, and very expensive. The 395nm-405nm LEDs on the other hand are very inexpensive. And best of all, can be bough as high-density LED-strip’s on 5-meter rolls. So I bought two “5M Ultraviolet 395nm 3528 SMD LED” rolls that have 120 LEDs per meter for a total of 600 LEDs per roll. From what I could tell from a bit of googling the wavelength should work even though it is not ideal. Initial tests proved that the 395nm LEDs worked very well.

DIY Double Sided 60W LED UV Radiation Unit With Vacuum Pump – [Link]

Make a proper PCB exposer out of a cheap UV nail curing lamp

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by alibenpuff @ instructables.com:

What do PCB production and fake fingernails have in common? They both use UV light sources of high intensity and, as luck would have it, those light sources have exactly the same wavelength. Only the ones for PCB production are usually quite costly and the ones for fake fingernails are a bit more competitively priced.

This instructable is about how to use such a device to build a low cost light source, suitable for exposing the various UV sensitive materials encountered in printed circuit board production, like dry film photoresist and UV curable soldermask.

Make a proper PCB exposer out of a cheap UV nail curing lamp – [Link]