Tag Archives: PIC

Designing a PIC24 development board

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Brian Dorey has designed and built a PIC24 development board, that is available at GitHub:

One problem we found was trying to prototype code using this microcontroller as unlike Arduino and any ARM microcontrollers there isn’t a small easy to use prototyping board available for the PIC24 chip. Microchip make an Explorer 16 Development Board which is designed to work with the PIC24 microcontrollers but it is large and fairly expensive and is designed to work best with other Microchip addon cards.

With this problem in mind we decided to design and build a small prototyping board that would work with the PIC24FJ128GC006 as well as one of Microchips DSPIC33EP256MU806 dsPIC series microcontrollers. The prototyping board was designed with removable daughter boards for the microcontroller.

Designing a PIC24 development board – [Link]

40 & 28 PIN PIC Development Board

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The PIC 40 / 28 PIN (DIP) Development / Evaluations board demonstrates the capabilities of Microchip’s 8-bit microcontrollers, specifically, 28- and 40-pin PIC16FXXX, PIC16F1XXX, and PIC18 devices. It can be used as a standalone demonstration board with a programmed part. With this board you can develop and prototype with all Microchip’s 40 & 28 PIN PIC microcontrollers which doesn’t require crystals (External Oscillator). On board connector for UART (RX-TX) allows an easy connection with embedded hardware. The board has a Reset switch and status LEDs.

40 & 28 PIN PIC Development Board – [Link]

PIC 18F – 28 PIN PIC Development Board

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This is a versatile, configurable, and cost effective Development Board designed for the 18F – 28 pin series of Microcontroller from Microchip. The board is simplest form with all the Port pins terminating in a header connector for easy connection to the outside world.

PIC 18F – 28 PIN PIC Development Board – [Link]

DIY ESP8266 Development Board

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ESP8266 is an 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi module which became very popular recently because of its capabilities and ease of use and integration. Many electronics hobbyists are building projects on ESP8266 and they generally need to connect the module to their PC or a microcontroller. Some interfacing problems arise at this point.

In this project, we are building an ESP8266 Development Board which lets the user make connection to ESP8266 from a PIC microcontroller and their PC. The board also provides all the needs to be used as microcontroller peripherals such as LCD display, pusbuttons, indicator LEDs and GPIO extension. The PC connection is done by the help of FT232RL USB-UART converter over a Mini-USB connector. Since the PIC microcontroller used is a 5V chip, 5V-3.3V bi-directional level converter circuits are also included on the board.

DIY ESP8266 Development Board – [Link]

PICnano breadboard based on PIC18F2550

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by Jesus Echavarria :

Hi all! With a bit of delay, here’s my last work, a PICnano breadboard based on the PIC18F2550 microcontroller. I have in mind a new project and I want to use an small board, like the Arduino Nano board. This new project is battery powered (3,7V Li-Ion battery). After checking the schematics of the Arduino Nano, I see that the microcontroler is powered at 5V. Of course, I can unmount the linear regulator (U3) that is on the board, and bypass the VIN to the microcontroller power supply. But I think it’s funny try to develop a new module when you’ve access to the microcontroller power supply! Also, I want to work with PIC microcontrollers after many years, so here’s what I design!

PICnano breadboard based on PIC18F2550 – [Link]

PIC Digital Thermometer & Clock

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Joe @ hobbyelectronics.net:

Here you will find complete construction details including circuit diagrams, PCB layouts and PIC firmware (and the source code). The code was written in Proton PIC BASIC but the good news is that there is now a free version of this compiler available for download; AMICUS18.

PIC Digital Thermometer & Clock – [Link]

Video generator with PIC.

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by Beke András @ bekeband.hu:

An black and white monitor needs to improve and repair from about 1990-th. The repair of device was not difficult but it caused troubles for the testing and setting of the monitor. We have a pattern TV generator, but this instrument are produce on the composite video signal for monitor. Unfortunately this monitor is demand not compozite signal instead of horizontal sync, vertical sync, and lightning signal. (video signal). Whereas the monitor host machine is not available – in fact I don”t know exactly what kind of equipment, perhaps a kind of mass spectrometer or something -, we need necessary a appropriate video signal source.

Video generator with PIC – [Link]

One wire brings power & data to LCD module

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by Benabadji Noureddine @ edn.com:

Embedded systems frequently use HD44780-type LCD displays as it is considered the most popular alphanumeric display controller. The interface comprises at least 14 pins: eight for data, three for control (EN, WR, RS), two for power supply (Vdd, Vss), and one for contrast (Vre). Configured in 8-bit mode, it requires at least 10 I/O lines (D0..D7, EN, RS). Configured in 4-bit mode, it requires at least six I/O lines (D4..D7, EN, RS). This last case seems usable when using an 8-pin PICmicro. However, 8-pin PICmicros have one pin as an input-only pin.

One wire brings power & data to LCD module – [Link]

Original PICKIT-2 microcontroller programmer

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Hristo writes:

These days I was thinking about a better PIC programmer that can work with Microchip MPLAB IDE software so that I can write my own programs or edit someone else’s programs. I found that there are numerous versions of the famous Microchip PICkit 2 on the web.

Some of them are using the original schematic published by Microchip and some are lite versions – with different parts or simplified schematics. None of them satisfied my requirements. So I got the original schematic, removed the memory chips and the input ICSP connector (which I didn’t plan to use anyway) and made a new single sided PCB. I used mostly SMD parts.

Original PICKIT-2 microcontroller programmer – [Link]

Simple PIC LC meter

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Here is another piece of laboratory equipment – LC meter. This type of meter, especially L meter is hard to find in cheap commercial multimeters.

Schematic of this one came from this web page: https://sites.google.com/site/vk3bhr/home/index2-html

It uses PIC microcontroller 16F628A, and because I recently acquired a PIC programmer, I decided to test it with this project. Following the above link you will find the original schematic, PCB, source and HEX files for programing the microcontroller and detailed description.

Simple PIC LC meter – [Link]