Tag Archives: PIC

CHIPINO – The Microchip PIC Based Arduino Style Module


Chipino is an electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for artists, designers, hobbyists, students, technicians, engineers and anyone else interested in creating interactive gadgets.

Chipino is not designed to replace Arduino, it’s just another option. Arduino is a great platform based on the Atmel microcontrollers. But many people prefer the Microchip PIC microcontrollers. There is a seemingly endless supply of software examples and application notes available for the Microchip PICs but a common hardware platform was missing.

CHIPINO – The Microchip PIC Based Arduino Style Module – [Link]

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel


Ytai Ben-Tsvi @ ytai-mer.blogspot.com build a PIC based 3W LED Driver that is chainable. He writes:

LED Pixel: The Pixie is a color LED module, allowing an external controller to change its color and brightness dynamically.
Chainable: The module is designed so that you can chain many of them and control each one individually. If you know NeoPixels, this concept should be clear, but in case you don’t, imagine you want to build a project that requires 50 LEDs to be individually controlled. Naively, you would need to power each on of them individually, then connect each one of them individually to a controller. This would require tons of wiring, many pins on the controller, each one possibly driven by a specialized peripheral, such as UART or PWM. In short, this is not practical. With the Pixie, being chainable, you connect the first LED’s input pins to power and a single control pin (serial TX) on the controller. Then you connect the first LED’s output pins (power, ground, data) to the input of the second LED, and so on. Each Pixie in the chain consumes its own data, then relays the rest of the data down the chain, so the controller can control each Pixie individually, without being connected to each one.

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel – [Link]

RC Servo Driver 0-5V


0 – 5V Servo Controller project will control a hobby type servo motor connected to it via a preset or external DC source.  This kit will be ideal add on in animatronics and motion control application.

This is a simple but a useful circuit to control a single servo motor.  Its an ideal add on to a RC Hobbyist tool kit. The DC input to this circuit should be 5 to 6 VDC.  DC signal is given to this board at connector marked CN1 (+V and GND).   You can also feed in a variable DC signal source at the other two pins on this connector to control the servo.  To use this signal source you need to place the Jumper link at J1 in the E position.  Alternatively, you can also control the servo motor by preset PR1 mounted on the PCB.  For this you need to place the Jumper link in the I position at J1.A Servo motor is connected at connector marked CN2 on the PCB.  This connector has all the pins clearly marked for connection to the servo.LED D1 is a power on indicator ,  Diode D2 provides a reverse polarity protection for the Microcontroller.


  • Microcontroller based design for greater flexibility and ease of control
  • Single Servo control via clearly marked berg connector
  • Clearly marked jumper to select signal source to control the Servo
  • Onboard preset for ready to control option for this kit
  • Power-on LED indicator
  • Diode protection for reverse polarity connection of DC supply to the PCB
  • Four mounting holes 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 45 mm x 32 mm

RC Servo Driver 0-5V – [Link]

Build Your Own PICKit 2 Programmer


pulsetronics.blogspot.com.ng has build a nice version of PICKIT Programmer:

This is my PICkit 2 clone design. Its based on a simplified version of the Microchip PICkit 2 schematic and only supports 5v parts. It works with all the Microchip software including MPLAB, MPLABX,the PICkit 2 GUI Programming software and the PICkit 2 command line software.

It can be used with the PICkit 2 GUI Terminal Software and the PICkit 2 GUI Logic Analyzer. Best of all its an all leaded design that you can build in about an hour if you have of the parts.

Because this design is simplified and uses a fixed voltage reference, the programmer voltage cannot be controlled by the PICkit 2 software settings to lower the voltage. It also cannot do the “Vpp First” mode which in rare cases you may need to re-program a PIC that has a very fast internal oscillator and internal MCLR enabled.

Build Your Own PICKit 2 Programmer – [Link]

USB PIC Programmer

DSCF2014-1024x768Stefano Purchiaroni rebuild a USB PIC Programmer that he found online. He writes:

This page is dedicated to everybody needs to program a PIC (Microchip) device via USB port. Looking on the web for ready-to-use projects, I found a good one called Open Programmer, coming with several schematics, PCBs and Open Source code. The original link is http://openprog.altervista.org/OP_ita.html

What concerned me was the need to mount, on the mainboard, a specific socket board depending on the model of PIC being programmed. Moreover, the proposed layout did not meet my personal “compact look” ideas. So, I propose hereafter a small layout version of that circuit, adopting a single smart on-board ZIF socket. This version sacrifices many non-PIC microcontroller models. I will thank everybody proposing a larger range implementation, suitable to program Atmel and other devices. Anyway, if your goal is to program PIC devices, you are on the good site.

A small box, a USB connector, a ZIF socket, two leds. That’all in my compact proposal.

USB PIC Programmer -[Link]

18 PIN PIC Development Board


The PIC 18 PIN (DIP) Development / Evaluations Board demonstrates the capabilities of Microchip’s 8-bit microcontrollers, specifically, 18 Pin PIC16F1847. It can be used as a standalone demonstration board with a programmed part. With this board you can develop and prototype with all Microchip’s 18 PIN PIC microcontrollers. The board has a Reset switch and status LEDs. On board 3.3 V and 5V DC regulators allows using 3V and 5V PICs, This board support both 3.3V low power and normal 5V operation. All I/O Pins out with 2 x female headers

Development Board Features:

  • 16 I/O Ports
  • Onboard 5V and 3.3V Supply
  • 3.3V or 5V Supply selection by jumper
  • Dual line I/O
  • On board Power Indication
  • On-board ICSP Port (PICKIT2 Standard Programming Port)
  • Well labeled legends
  • All outputs has provision for LEDs for output indication
  • Replaceable PIC Microcontroller,
  • Crystal and capacitor mounting under the PCB

18 PIN PIC Development Board – [Link]

Matchbox car


Shane has been working on making small robots and made a prototype of a matchbox car, a robot car that fits inside a matchbox:

This build consists of a tiny DC motors ripped from a pair of 9g servos, a h-bridge motor controller, an el-cheapo 8 bit pic and a 100mAh 3.7V LiPo battery.

Matchbox car – [Link]

Designing a PIC24 development board


Brian Dorey has designed and built a PIC24 development board, that is available at GitHub:

One problem we found was trying to prototype code using this microcontroller as unlike Arduino and any ARM microcontrollers there isn’t a small easy to use prototyping board available for the PIC24 chip. Microchip make an Explorer 16 Development Board which is designed to work with the PIC24 microcontrollers but it is large and fairly expensive and is designed to work best with other Microchip addon cards.

With this problem in mind we decided to design and build a small prototyping board that would work with the PIC24FJ128GC006 as well as one of Microchips DSPIC33EP256MU806 dsPIC series microcontrollers. The prototyping board was designed with removable daughter boards for the microcontroller.

Designing a PIC24 development board – [Link]

40 & 28 PIN PIC Development Board


The PIC 40 / 28 PIN (DIP) Development / Evaluations board demonstrates the capabilities of Microchip’s 8-bit microcontrollers, specifically, 28- and 40-pin PIC16FXXX, PIC16F1XXX, and PIC18 devices. It can be used as a standalone demonstration board with a programmed part. With this board you can develop and prototype with all Microchip’s 40 & 28 PIN PIC microcontrollers which doesn’t require crystals (External Oscillator). On board connector for UART (RX-TX) allows an easy connection with embedded hardware. The board has a Reset switch and status LEDs.

40 & 28 PIN PIC Development Board – [Link]

PIC 18F – 28 PIN PIC Development Board


This is a versatile, configurable, and cost effective Development Board designed for the 18F – 28 pin series of Microcontroller from Microchip. The board is simplest form with all the Port pins terminating in a header connector for easy connection to the outside world.

PIC 18F – 28 PIN PIC Development Board – [Link]