Tag Archives: Power supply

Programmable Power Supply Using OPA548

Project provides 1.2 to 20V DC output with current limiter adjustable to 0-5A. I have tested the circuit with 250mA output without a heat sink. Project is capable to drive 3A continues load and 5A peak, large size heat sink required for full load. The tiny power supply based on low cost OPA548 high-voltage and high-current operational amplifier is ideal for driving a wide variety of loads. The project provides excellent low-level signal accuracy and high-output voltage and current. The circuits operate with single supply 24V DC and logic supply 5V DC. The IC is internally protected against over-temperature condition and current overload. Trimmer potentiometer PR1 sets the output voltages, PR2 helps to set the current limit 0 to 5Amps.
Programmable Power Supply Using OPA548 – [Link]

Proto Board Power Supply

David Johnson-Davies @ technoblogy.com build a breadboard friendly power supply to power your Arduino or other low power electronics. The power supply is able to deliver 0V to 5.5V at up to 0.5A and it’s powered from two Li-Ion rechargeable batteries. The output can be adjusted using a rotary encoder, and the voltage is displayed on a three-digit 7-segment display. The whole circuit is controlled by an ATmega328.

15V 1A Dual Output Flyback DC-DC Converter

+/-15V 1A Dual output DC-DC converter is a tiny board built using Transformer from Renco and LM2587-ADJ IC from Texas instrument.  Input supply 18-36V DC.  The LM2587 regulators is monolithic integrated circuit specifically designed for fly back, step-up (boost), and forward converter applications. The power switch is a 5.0A NPN device that can stand-off 65V. Protecting the power switch are current and thermal limiting circuits, and an under voltage lockout circuit. This IC contains a 100 kHz fixed frequency internal oscillator that permits the use of small magnetics. Other features include soft start mode to reduce in-rush current during start up, current mode control for improved rejection of input voltage and output load transients and cycle-by-cycle current limiting. An output voltage tolerance of ±4%, within specified input voltages and output load conditions, is ensured for the power supply system.

Features

  • Supply Input 18-36V DC
  • Output +/-15V DC, 1Amp
  • On board trimmer potentiometer for Fine voltage adjust
  • Operation Frequency 100 KHz

15V 1A Dual Output Flyback DC-DC Converter – [Link]

Versatile And Open Source LiPo bBattery Breadboard Power Supply

Orlando Hoilett from Calvary Engineering LLC designed a  versatile Li-Po battery breadboard power supply and wrote an Instructables on it. This power supply outputs 3.3V to the breadboard and takes input from a single-cell LiPo battery. The breadboard power supply also has the ability to charge the battery without needing to separate it from the circuit board. More importantly, this project is licensed under Open Source Hardware which means anyone can modify, distribute, make, and sell this design.

LiPo bread board power supply
LiPo breadboard power supply

Key Components

The complete BOM is available at the GitHub repository.

  • JST connector
    This connector connects directly to the LiPo battery.
  • 3.3V regulator, AP2210K
    3.3V logic is getting increasingly popular among electronics hobbyists and engineers. Also, boosting 3.7V of a LiPo battery to 5V can induce quite a bit of switching noise on the power supply. Linearly converting 3.7V to 3.3V is the best way to avoid this problem.
  • Battery Charger, MCP73831T
    This power supply has a charger built into the board so you can charge the battery without removing it from the power supply.
  • Voltage Selection Jumper
    The voltage selection headers are 3 pin male headers and they are labeled as 3.3V (or VReg) and VRAW (or LiPo). Connect the center pin to 3.3V to get power from the regulator. Connect the center pin to VRAW to get power directly from the LiPo battery.
  • DPDT Switch
    This switch lets you power down the board without removing the battery.
  • LED indicators
    LEDs are used to indicate the current status of the board.

Details

This board breaks out the LiPo battery to the breadboard power rails on both sides. It has a DPDT switch to power down the board. The AP2210K IC has an ENABLE pin which is pulled down to the ground using the DPDT switch in order to enter the low power mode. In low power mode, the regulator and all the LEDs get disabled and draws almost no current from the LiPo. More about the AP2210K regulator IC is on this datasheet.

LiPo breadboard power supply schematic
LiPo breadboard power supply schematic

Another great feature of this breadboard power supply as mentioned earlier is, it incorporates an MCP73831T LiPo battery charger IC. It is a widely used PMIC (power management integrated circuit) for charging LiPo batteries. The LiPo battery should be connected to pin 3 (VBAT) and 5V should be applied to pin 4 (VDD).

The chip starts charging as soon as it detects 5V input and stops charging when the battery is full. Charging current is limited to USB standard i.e. 100mA by connecting a 10.2K resistor between pin 5 (PROG) and ground. So, it’s completely safe to charge the battery from your laptops USB port. Other host microcontrollers can check the battery status using pin 1 (status pin) of MCP73831T.

Keysight Technologies’ E36300 series bench power supplies

Martin Rowe @ edn.com presents the new Keysight E36300 bench power supply with triple output and some great features.

Keysight Technologies’ E36300 series of bench power supplies provide three outputs with power of 80 W or 160 W with line/load regulation of 0.01%. Front-panel buttons let you turn any output on or off and you can configure each output with 2-wire local sensing or 4-wire remote sensing. The 4-wire sensing removes losses caused by IR drops in your power-delivery wires.

Keysight Technologies’ E36300 series bench power supplies – [Link]

Linear Lab Power Supply with digital meter

@ instructables.com build a nice power supply for his lab. He writes:

From my point of view one of the best ways to get started in electronics is to build your own laboratory power supply. In this instructable I have tried to collect all the necessary steps so that anyone can construct his own.

All the parts of the assembly are directly orderable in digikey, ebay, amazon or aliexpress except the meter circuit. I made a custom meter circuit shield for Arduino able to measure up to 36V – 4A, with a resolution of 10mV – 1mA that can be used for other projects also.

Linear Lab Power Supply with digital meter – [Link]

Digital Battery Operated Powersupply

ThomasVDD @ instructables.com writes:

A while back I built a powersupply from an old ATX PSU, and while it works great, I wanted to step up my game with a digital powersupply. As already said, it is powered by batteries (2 lithium cells to be precise), and it can deliver a maximum of 20 V at 1 A; which is plenty for most of my projects that require a precise powersupply.

Digital Battery Operated Powersupply – [Link]

400V – 5A Power Supply For Brushless Motor Drivers

Although the power supply design is specific to the Brushless Servo Drivers mainly for IPM Modules, the concepts and circuit design may be used for any power supply requires high voltage output up to 400V DC and 5 Amps. The power supply is an unregulated design with an option to allow connection to either 120V or 230V mains and also it can work with lower voltage for audio amplifiers by increasing capacitor value. The design uses fully integrated bridge rectifier, and multiple bus capacitors for low ripple, noise suppression, and provides high current reservoirs. Additionally the dc supply line have bleeder resistor R2 and R3 to drain the large reservoir capacitors PCB, mounted fuse holder provided  for short circuit and over current protections, low ohm NTC used for inrush current at power start up,  C1, C12, TX protects  against turn on/off spikes and EMI noise reduction. This power supply can be used to drive Tesla Coils, Induction heaters, DC Motor drivers, Brushless DC motor driver.

400V – 5A Power Supply For Brushless Motor Drivers – [Link]

Reference design – USB Type-C charger delivers 18W

Graham Prophet @ eedesignnewseurope.com discuss about a 18W USB power supply reference design.

This joint reference design describes an 18W, USB PD compliant, AC-DC power converter. The design, titled DER-567, pairs the WT6630P USB Type-C PD controller from Weltrend with Power Integrations’ InnoSwitch-CP off-line CV/CC flyback switcher IC, to produce a compact and highly energy-efficient standards-compliant power adapter, that PI says will deliver faster charge times for the larger batteries required to power next-generation mobile devices.

Reference design – USB Type-C charger delivers 18W – [Link]

-5V @100mA Switched Capacitor Converter

The circuit diagram presented here is about a negative voltage regulator. It is based on LT1054, which is a switched capacitor voltage converter with regulator from Texas instrument. This device has many advantages over other previously available switched capacitor voltage converters. It provides higher current and has lower voltage losses.

Features:

  • Input Voltage: 3.5VDC to 15VDC
  • Output Voltage: -5VDC
  • Output load: 100mA
  • PCB: 60mm X 20mm

-5V @100mA Switched Capacitor Converter – [Link]