Tag Archives: Power

Build a Cloud-Connected ESP8266 Power Meter

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Measure the DC power consumption of your devices on the cloud @ adafruit.com

Controlling the electrical consumption in your home is one of the most important thing you can do, both because of environmental concerns & to reduce the electricity bill at the end of the month. There are countless of electrical power meters out there, but in this guide, I’ll show you how to build your own, and to use the ESP8266 feather board to measure how much power a single device is using. Note that this guide is about measuring power for DC (Direct Current) devices only.

Build a Cloud-Connected ESP8266 Power Meter – [Link]

Low-side I/V sensing IC, with internal power calculation

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Maxim Integrated has posted details of the MAX44299, a low-side current, voltage, and power monitoring circuit that provides an analogue output current proportional to the measured current, voltage, and the internally calculated instantaneous power. The power monitor offers high precision and integration in tiny size.

Instantaneous power is calculated internally by multiplying the load current and a fraction of the load voltage set by an external resistive divider. All three outputs are scaled to a full-scale current of 100 µA. An additional output current of 100 µA is available at the reference (REF) output; this current can be used to create a reference voltage for the ADC that is being used to measure the power, voltage, and current signals.

Low-side I/V sensing IC, with internal power calculation – [Link]

USB Power Meter

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Daniel Grießhaber @ hackaday.io has published his build of a USB power meter. His device is based on ATTiny 85 mcu and 0.96″ OLED Display and is able to measure voltage, current and power output from USB port.

Since USB has become more and more a power delivery standard, it would be nice to have a convenient way to measure the power consumption these devices need. Of course there are already power meters out there, but they are just boring or don’t have all the features I like.

USB Power Meter – [Link]

1.3V – 15.5V @ 2 Amps Power Supply

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Here is a low cost and easy to build power supply based on a some Chinese DC-DC converter modules:

This is a small size power supply with low cost and easy to make that only taking about 5 more hours. I was very happy with it and would share with you.

Power Supply Specifications

Input: 5v-16v/3A DC

Output: 1.3V – 15.5V/2 Amps

1.3V – 15.5V @ 2 Amps Power Supply – [Link]

Internet-of-Things Power Meter

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This is a simple, cheap, easy to build IoT Power Meter that provides accurate statistics on household power consumption:

The Internet-of-Things Power Meter (IPM) is a device fixed on top of the regular household power meter that provides detailed information about the electricity usage. Modern power meters have a LED blinking every time a Watt is used, the IPM detects these flashes using a light sensor, counts them, saves the values to an SD card. Later the data is stored to the cloud.

Internet-of-Things Power Meter – [Link]

LTC4125 – 5W AutoResonant Wireless Power Transmitter

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The LTC4125 is a simple and high performance monolithic full bridge resonant driver capable of delivering over 5W of power wirelessly to a properly tuned receiver. The device controls the current flow in a series connected transmit coil LC network to create a simple, safe and versatile wireless power transmitter.

The LTC4125 wireless power transmitter improves upon a basic transmitter by providing three key features: an AutoResonant function that maximizes available receiver power, an Optimum Power Search algorithm that maximizes overall wireless power system efficiency, and Foreign Object Detection (FOD) to ensure safe and reliable operation when working in the presence of conductive foreign objects.

LTC4125 – 5W AutoResonant Wireless Power Transmitter – [Link]

Portable Adjustable Mini Power supply

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Mixed Output @ instructables.com has build a nice power supply by combining different power modules.

As most of my project involve electronics of some sort, having a good power supply is essential to be able to meet the demand of different power requirements. So I built me a bench-top power supply from an old ATX power supply Unit (PSU) that worked (and still works) great. However I’ve recently noticed some limitations with having a full fledged bench top PSU.

Portable Adjustable Mini Power supply – [Link]

Power ON Delay Switch

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Power-ON Delay Switch which can be used in all applications requiring a delay during power-on from 1 to 60 seconds.

Specifications

  • Supply input 5 VDC
  • Relay output SPDT relay
  • Relay specification 5 A @ 250 VAC
  • Preset adjustable range function
  • Power-On LED indicator
  • Screw terminal connector for easy relay output connection
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 44 mm x 42 mm

Power ON Delay Switch – [Link]

Nixie Tube Energy Meter

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John Whittington decided to build a Nixie tube energy meter to measure his house power consumption.

 An Arduino would be the microcontroller but I wanted the meter to provide some form of data stream for a web based energy history. To make it an IoT, I a paired ESP8266 with it. I used both together because the Arduino ADC has a better resolution and has been tried and tested.

Nixie Tube Energy Meter – [Link]

 

Adding a USB power port to a switch for IoT

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Jesus Echavarria @ jechavarria.com has tipped us with his latest project. In this project he adds a USB power port to a switch.

Also I need a power supply for the Arduino board, and I think that, better than a external USB AC wall adaptor or power supply, is modify the switch to add it a USB power port that can power the Arduino board. I’ve got at home a TP-Link TL-SF1008D, a simple 8 port 10/100 Mbps switch. So, let’s go to open it and add it the USB port!

Adding a USB power port to a switch for IoT – [Link]