Tag Archives: Programming

Sino: bit – Changing Programming for Kids All Over the World

Creating projects with Arduino can be challenging for kids, this may cause children to lose interest in electronics and DIY projects. The most complicated part is usually the connections required to use a sensor, led matrix or other devices that can be connected to the Arduino (or other microcontrollers). Since all these devices are different and have different types of connections which need to be made in a certain way, electronic projects may get boring or too complicated for a kid to learn. If the objective is to teach a kid how to code without the extra complication of cables, then the Sino: bit is the perfect choice.

Sino: bit is a microcontroller designed for teaching computer education in China created by Naomi Wu a DIY enthusiast. It is based on Calliope mini and can be programmed with Arduino IDE. It includes a 12×12 LED matrix, accelerometer, magnetometer, Bluetooth, buttons, a micro USB for programming, temperature sensor and a JST 3v battery connector. The battery connector was included to run projects without the need to be connected to the computer at all times.

Usually, when learning how to program kids are taught “hello world” which is a simple code that displays the same message. The 12x 12 LED matrix has that size not only to allow kids to play with a huge number of LEDs, but also to allow kids from every nation to do and understand their hello world. This was a problem because Chinese, Japanese, Hindi and other languages contain characters that cannot be displayed in a small matrix.

It’s the first to obtain the OSHWA (open source hardware association) certification in China which is an association in charge of making the task of identifying and marketing open source hardware products clearer and more transparent.

With a simple installation procedure, codes such as blink can start to work, and children all over the world would be able to experience “hello world” in their own language which will bring opportunities and open doors for non-English speaking kids. With all the sensors and options that it offers projects can be as simple as playing with LEDs and as complex as communicating with an external app to send information about the sensors. With the use of Sino: bit not only programming will be more inclusive, but also more code focused because instead of spending a lot of time thinking about connections kids can test their projects faster and with less room for errors.

[Source]

Attiny Programmer (using Arduino UNO)

by @ instructables.com:

The Arduino UNO is small, but if you require your project to be in a small enclosure, the UNO might be way too big. You could try using a NANO or MINI, but if you really want to go small, you go tiny, Attiny to be precise.

They are quite small, cheap chips (basically small Arduinos) and can be programmed in the Arduino IDE, however you might notice that there is no USB connection. So how do we program it???

Attiny Programmer (using Arduino UNO) – [Link]

A simple and reliable programming & test jig

Pieter @ piconomix.com tipped us with his latest build. Check it out on the link below.

I recently had to create a programming jig for an ATmega328PB based board. 1mm diameter test pads were placed on the bottom of the PCB to give access to the ISP pins. Normally one would add two 3mm diameter holes to locate the PCB on the jig, but this PCB was too small and only had two indents on each side to keep it in place

A simple and reliable programming & test jig – [Link]

How to Write and Run a C Program on the Raspberry Pi

In this tutorial, circuitbasics.com discuss what a C program is, what C programming is used for, and finally, how to write and run a C program on the Raspberry Pi.

The C programming language is one of the most widely used programming languages of all time. It is computationally faster and more powerful than Python. C is a middle level programming language because of its low level of abstraction to assembly language.

How to Write and Run a C Program on the Raspberry Pi – [Link]

A Mass Programming Bench for ATMega32u4 MCUs

“limpkin” @ limpkin.fr wanted to program some thousand of MCUs so he decided to build his own programming bench. He writes:

As you may know I started the Mooltipass offline password keeper project more than 2 years ago. Together with a team of volunteers from all over the globe I created two Mooltipass devices which were successfully crowdfunded through Indiegogo and Kickstarter, raising a total of around $290k.
Through a secure mechanism it is possible to upgrade the firmware running on the Mooltipass units. On our latest device, the Mooltipass Mini, we implemented signed firmware updates, which involved storing inside the microcontrollers’ memory some cryptographic keys.

A Mass Programming Bench for ATMega32u4 MCUs – [Link]

Turn Arduino into an AVR TPI Programmer

Elliot Williams @ hackaday.com show us how to use your Arduino to program AVR TPI enabled microcontrollers.

Turning an Arduino of virtually any sort into a simple AVR 6-pin ISP programmer is old hat. But when Atmel came out with a series of really tiny AVR chips, the ATtiny10 and friends with only six pins total, they needed a new programming standard. Enter TPI (tiny programming interface), and exit all of your previously useful DIY AVR programmers.

Turn Arduino into an AVR TPI Programmer – [Link]

It’s the end of C as we know it!

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beningo.com discuss about the future of C language and it’s use in embedded systems.

The C programming language has been with embedded software developers since its creation in 1972. Ever since then C has been a blazing constant, surviving even the big push in the late 90’s and early 21st century to move to C++ or other object oriented languages. Undoubtedly, C will continue to be a foundational language for embedded systems but over the last year, the language has begun to see a decrease in popularity.

It’s the end of C as we know it! – [Link]

IEEE Ranking for Programming Languages – 2016

Are you an embedded system programmer? Checkout the rank of your favorite programming language according to IEEE Spectrum ranking. C language is in the first place for programming devices controllers, followed by C++, Arduino, then Assembly.

IEEE Spectrum has special methods to figure these ranks, for example they “measure the number of hits for each language by using Google’s API to search for the template (X programming)”, the page states, also using some statistical data from GitHub.

You can review The results in a dynamic way either using the overall ranking by IEEE Spectrum, or by making your own.

IEEE_Ranking

 

 

Arduino Inline Assembly Tutorial

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ucexperiment.wordpress.com has published a series of tutorials on how to use assembly language on Arduino. This can be pretty helpful if you want to do some advantaged coding on Arduino.

An inline assembly statement is a string which specifies assembler code. The string can contain any instructions recognized by the assembler, including directives (we will not discuss assembler directives here). GCC does not parse the assembler instructions and does not know what they mean or even whether they are valid. Multiple assembler instructions can be placed together in a single asm string.

Arduino Inline Assembly Tutorial – [Link]

Getting Started With the ATMega328P

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Here is a detailed guide on how to get started with ATMega328P microcontroller. The guide goes in details on how to setup it on a breadboard and how to upload your first code on it. and blink a led.

The real benefit of using this microcontroller is that it’s only $4 US, whereas many other micro-controllers are 10X that price. It can also be easily programmed in the universal programming language, C++. The ATMega is also equipped with a decent amount of memory for any project.

Getting Started With the ATMega328P – [Link]