Tag Archives: PWM

Half Bridge Driver based on IR2104

Half-Bridge-Driver-IMG_4772

This Half-bridge driver based on IR2104 gate driver IC and N channel Dpak MOSFET , The IR2104 is a high voltage, high speed power MOSFET driver with independent high and low side referenced output channels. HVIC and latch immune CMOS technologies enable ruggedized monolithic construction. The logic input is compatible with standard COMOS or LSTTL output, down to 3.3V logic. A gate IR2104 driver is a power amplifier that accepts a low-power input from a controller IC and produces a high-current drive input for the gate of a high-power transistor such as a power MOSFET. In essence, a gate driver consists of a level shifter in combination with an amplifier.

This drive has many application, ranging from DC-DC power supply for high power density and efficiency, This project simplifies the design of control systems for a wide range of motor applications such as home appliances, industrial drives, DC brushed motors , Brushless motors, fans, Tesla Coil driver, Induction coil driver, LED driver, Halogen Lamp driver.

Specifications

  • Load Supply 12 to 36V DC
  • Load Current 10Amps (Peak 20Amps)
  • Logic Supply 12 To 15V DC
  • Input Signals 3.3V to 15V
  • SMD based tiny design
  • Required Single PWM input
  • Shutdown Input
  • Screw Terminals for Load and Load Supply
  • Header Connector for Logic supply and inputs

Half Bridge Driver based on IR2104 – [Link]

How-to use PWM to Generate Analog Voltage in Digital Circuits

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Maurizio @ emcelettronica.com tipped us with his latest article on how to generate analog voltages using a microcontroller.

Many times, designers are faced with the need of generating analogue or analog voltage levels in purely digital circuits. Although the market provides today a very broad range of dedicated digital-to-analogue converters, putting such a device in the schematic has a negative impact on the overall cost of the system.

How-to use PWM to Generate Analog Voltage in Digital Circuits – [Link]

AC PWM dimmer for Arduino

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diy_bloke @ instructables.com has designed an AC PWM dimmer for Arduino:

Over 3 years ago, I published a simpel TRIAC AC dimmer for the arduino. That proved to be a very popular design. Yet in spite of the simplicity of the circuit the software needed was a bit complicated as it needed to keep track of the zero crossing of the AC signal, then keep track of the time and then finally open the TRIAC. So to avoid letting the arduino just wait for most of the time, an interrupt and a timer were necessary.

AC PWM dimmer for Arduino – [Link]

1″ 100W Hot-Plate for SMT Reflow

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This is a small hot-plate for SMT reflow soldering build upon an Arduino Pro and controlled using PWM and high side power MOSFETs.

Black Mesa Labs has been using a $20 hot plate for a year now for soldering QFN ICs to PCBs. Only issue so far has been the size ( 10″x10″x3″ ) and thermal mass of the thing as it consumes precious microscope work area and unfortunately stays quite hot for 30+ minutes after a quick 4 minute reflow job. BML boards are mostly 1″x1″, so a 800W hot plate with a 6″ diameter heating surface is overkill for most jobs.

1″ 100W Hot-Plate for SMT Reflow – [Link]

Dual DC Motor driver using two L293D

Dual-DC-Motor-driver-for-robot-using-L293D-DC001

Dual DC Motor driver using two L293D IC. The L293D device is quadruple high-current half-H driver. The 293D is designed to provide bidirectional drive current up to 600mA a voltage from 5V to 36V. It provides 600mA +600mA on each channel suitable for mini hobby robots. The board been designed mainly for small size robot, however this can be used for other application where two motor control required. L293D includes the output clamping diodes for protections. Each channel required two input signals PWM and DIR for full control. Separate logic supply to reduce dissipation.

Specifications

  • Motor/Logic supply 5 to 36 V
  • Logic controls input 7 VDC max
  • Inhibit facility/enable
  • PWM Frequency 5KHz Maximum
  • High Noise immunity
  • Over temperature protection
  • Capable of delivering output current up to 600 mA per channel
  • The control/interface lines are accessible with Berg connector
  • Header connector for motor and supply connection

Dual DC Motor driver using two L293D – [Link]

PWM dimmer for RGB LED

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Lukas Fassler has designed and built a PWM dimmer for RGB LED:

In my last post I’ve described the design and construction of my LED dimmer project. This project here is similar but a bit more involved. It controls RGB LEDs so it can not only change the brightness but also the color of the light. Instead of a simple pot it used a pair of rotary encoders with push buttons. One controls the brightness, pushing its button turns the light on or off. The other changes the color, pushing its button toggles between color and white.

PWM dimmer for RGB LED – [Link]

PWM dimmer for LED lighting

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Lukas Fassler has published a new project, a DIY PWM dimmer for LED lighting. The dimmer can handle 100W@12V and is controlled by a single potentiometer.

I have recently moved to a new apartment and was looking for a PWM dimmer to control some 12V LED strips. I thought that should be easy enough nowadays but it proved more difficult than I thought. All I found either didn’t meet my requirements, were uggly or expensive. So I decided to build my own, tailor-made to my needs.

PWM dimmer for LED lighting – [Link]

LMD18200 H-Bridge Module for DC Motor

LMD18200_Module_M029

The module has been designed around LMD18200 from Texas Instruments. The LMD18200 is a 3A H-Bridge designed for motion control applications. The device is built using a multi-technology process which combines bipolar and CMOS control circuitry with DMOS power devices on the same monolithic structure. Ideal for driving DC and stepper motors; the LMD18200 accommodates peak output currents up to 6A. An innovative circuit which facilitates low-loss sensing of the output current has been implemented.

Features

  • Powerful bi-directional DC Motor driver
  • Screw-terminals for Power Supply and Motor Connections
  • 6-pin Header connector for PWM, direction, current sense, Brake
  • Delivers Up to 3A Continuous Output (6A Peak)
  • Operates at Supply Voltages Up to 55V
  • Low RDS (ON) Typically 0.33Ω per Switch at 3A
  • TTL and CMOS Compatible Inputs
  • No “Shoot-Through” Current
  • Thermal Warning Flag Output at 145°C
  • Thermal Shutdown (Outputs Off) at 170°C
  • Internal Clamp Diodes
  • Shorted Load Protection
  • Internal Charge Pump with External Bootstrap Capability
  • Mounting holes of 2.6 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 44 mm x 25 mm

LMD18200 H-Bridge Module for DC Motor – [Link]

Staff with Click Sound and Obstacle Alarm

People who are visually impaired usually use a staff to guide them as they walk. They tap with their staff to know if an obstacle is present around. Others use the echolocation technique. They produce a clicking sound through their tongue, foot, and fingers and through this they detect objects from their surrounding by sensing the echoes produced.

The design above is a simple project that aims to assist visually impaired persons by having a staff that produces a beep/click sound that they can use for echolocation and also has an ultrasonic sensor that alerts the user if there is an obstacle ahead. Inside the handle of the staff, the control circuit is located. Below it, the speaker is positioned facing front to release in a forward direction the beep/click sounds for the user to sense what is ahead. The speaker is connected to PWM pin of the microcontroller to produce sound. An ultrasonic sensor is located at the base of the staff. It is connected to an interrupt pin of the microcontroller. The continuous beep/click sound is replaced by an alarm sound when the sensor detects an obstacle. With this, additional aid is provided to the user especially to those who are not trained to be capable of echolocation. The base circuit and the control circuit in the handle are connected through the use of 179840-1 and 177900-4 Power Double Lock from TE Connectivity. These are headers and crimp housing connectors that provides durability to the design. The feature locking capability that secures the mating of the circuits connected together.

The design is operated with a +5V battery and has a switch to ON/OFF the circuit. The project is programmed to detect objects half meter and below. Beyond this range, the design will not alarm for the user to have a lesser restriction in moving. With this design, visually impaired users don’t have to tap their staff hard, which could hit someone or something.

Staff with Click Sound and Obstacle Alarm – [Link]