Tag Archives: Reflow

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build

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Andy build an android reflow controller based on ATMega8L . He writes:

Welcome to the never ending saga of Andy and his reflow controllers. About a year ago I published a project writeup showing how I built a PID-based reflow controller. It featured a 640×360 graphical LCD from the Sony U5 Vivaz mobile phone and was all-surface mount. It worked well and continues to serve me well to this day but I always thought that there were improvements that I could make in several areas.

Firstly, there’s no reason why it should have been all surface-mount. The LCD in particular has a 0.4mm connector that many people will find very hard to solder by hand. After all, presumably you’re building a reflow controller to help solve that very problem. Chicken and egg.

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build – [Link]

Reflow Château – Reflow oven controller

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by Will Floyd-Jones:

When Adafruit announced their capacitive touchscreen shield, I knew I had to do something cool with it. I mocked up a design for the Château using an Atmega32u4, but once I saw this post on Hackaday, I quickly changed to the Teensy 3.1. Being able to update the display at a reasonable rate makes for a much more usable interface.

I decided to build the Reflow Château for the undergraduate ECE projects lab at my university because (A) that way I could get funding for it, (B) the existing toaster in the lab has to be manually operated and has literally blown up SMA electrolytic caps on a board of mine due to its poor temperature control, and (C) the man frowns upon the use of toasters in dorm rooms, so I needed a place to keep this thing anyway. The guy in charge of the lab requested two, so the Reflow Château actually has an identical twin.

Reflow Château – Reflow oven controller – [Link]

Reflow Soldering Controller

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by pleasantsoftware.com:

This is reflow soldering controller for use with a toaster oven as reflow soldering oven.

I bought the toaster oven in a local super market for about 40 €. There was also a cheaper oven on sale, but I wasn’t sure if it did 250°C, so I bought the more expensive and prettier one.

Since I don’t want to loose the warranty and also haven’t any interest of the oven’s internals, I designed the reflow controller as an oven-external device which directly switches the oven’s mains on/off.

The relay I use is for 6V, but it seems to work just fine with the 5V supply from the ATtiny. On the mains side, the relay is rated for 230V/16A.

The whole controller is based on a ATtiny 45 µController. I use one pin as input for the 100k thermistor for temperature measurement (connected to JP3), one pin controls the mains relay (via a BC140 transistor), one pin controls a LED for feedback and one pin is connected to a switch for user input.

Reflow Soldering Controller – [Link]

Reflow Master Shield – Arduino Solder Reflow Oven

Turn your toaster oven into your own solder reflow factory shop using the Reflow Master Shield!!!

The Reflow Master Shield from Paladin Enabling Technologies is an Arduino shield that turns your normal toaster oven into a reflow oven. A reflow oven is used in the production of electronics to change solder paste from a paste form to a liquid form and lastly to a solid form. This results in all your components being soldered for you in one run.

But let me share with you why I’ve created the Reflow Master Shield and why you would want one.

Reflow Master Shield – Arduino Solder Reflow Oven – [Link]

Temperature controlled reflow oven build

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Matt of SkyLabs has a nice build log about a temperature controlled reflow oven he built using an Arduino based PID controller and a standard toaster oven:

We have successfully managed to build a temperature controlled reflow oven using an Arduino based PID controller and a standard toaster oven from Robert Dyas! This is a must have accessory for any hobbyist who regularly uses surface mount components within their designs. Below we have a build log documenting the process of constructing the oven including:
Teardown of the original oven
Custom enclosure construction
Control Methods
Arduino Installation

So to start off I will outline a basic parts list of what I used:
Arduino Uno
Reflow Oven Shield
Solid State Relay
K-Type Thermocouple
230v AC to 5v DC Power Supply
Custom Laser Cut Enclosure

[via]

Temperature controlled reflow oven build – [Link]

Toaster oven reflow controller

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by Henrik’s Blog @ hforsten.com:

Nowadays many of the most “exiting” chips come only in leadless packages, such as BGA and QFN which are hard or impossible to solder just by soldering iron, because leads are under the chip where they can’t be reached. These kinds of chips are usually soldered using reflow soldering. In reflow process solder paste is used instead of solder wire. It contains very small balls of solder in flux, diameter of the balls is just few micrometers. First this paste is put on the contact pads, then components are placed on the pads and whole board is heated in reflow oven where solder balls in the paste melt and attaches the components firmly in place.

Toaster oven reflow controller – [Link]

Reflow Oven Controller with graphics TFT

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0xPIT @ github.com writes:

This Reflow Oven Controller relies on an Arduino Pro Micro, which is similar to the Leonardo and easily obtainable on eb*y for less than $10, plus my custom shield, which is actually more like a motherboard.

As I believe it is not wise to have a mess of wiring and tiny breakout-boards for operating mains powered equipment, I’ve decided to design custom board with easily obtainable components.

The hardware can be found in the folder hardware, including the Eagle schematics and PCB layout files. It should fit the freemium version of Eagle

Reflow Oven Controller with graphics TFT – [Link]

mikroe.com – These are the new machines that tripled our production capabilities

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by Srdjan Misic

YouTube is full of Christmas gift freak-out videos, with kids loosing themselves in episodes of hysterical happiness because they discovered an Xbox or something like that under the tree. Screaming and jumping around the room, completely loosing it.

Although adults, some of us were on the verge of reenacting some of those YouTube classics. Most of all, it’s the guys in the anti-static blue shirts that work in the manufacturing area. The occasion, of course, was the arrival of four brand new machines.

mikroe.com – These are the new machines that tripled our production capabilities – [Link]