Tag Archives: Remote

Arduino IR remote and Software controller

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This is a DIY Infrared remote for speakers, replacing the original. Arduino Nano and controlled via a custom .NET application and placed in a laser cut enclosure.

This one is an interesting one, it’s something we’ve been looking at for a while and figuring out how to solve it. We have sets of speakers and projectors and the users keep losing the remotes, or misplaced/stolen. Usually this wouldn’t be a problem, we’ll just contact the supplier or manufacturer and order replacements. Except we can’t any more.

We have a set of Vision AV-1000 wall mounted active speakers, connected to an EPSON projector. Projector remotes are easy to come by, but the AV-1000 remote is no longer manufactured. The speakers do not have any manual controls for the input selection, bass/treble etc. only a volume control on the back.

Arduino IR remote and Software controller – [Link]

Arduino IR Remote Control

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theorycircuit @ instructables.com shows us how to use TSOP 1738 IR receiver with your Arduino Board.

By using arduino and IR Receiver TSOP 1738 (in our project, you can use any ir receiver available) we can decode any infrared remote code into hex or some other format. Before constructing the circuit check datasheet of IR receiver having in your hand, hence you can connect proper bias pins and output pin.

Arduino IR Remote Control – [Link]

4 CHANNEL INFRARED REMOTE MODULE

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4 Channel Infrared (IR) Remote is a simple project using the popular  HT12A and HT12D encoder / decoder chips from Holtek.

Specifications

  • Supply – Transmitter: 2.4 ~ 5 VDC, 5 V @ 20 mA & Receiver: 5 ~ 6 VDC, 5 V @ 50 mA
  •  Output – 4 Latched/Momentary TTL compatible outputs
  •  Crystal based oscillator for reliability of operation
  •  DIP switch selectable 8 bit address code
  •  LED output to indicate reception
  •  ON/OFF slide switch in the transmitter
  •  Power-On LED indicator in the Receiver / Transmitter
  •  High noise immunity
  •  Berg connector for interfacing of the board
  •  Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  •  PCB dimensions – Transmitter: 61 mm x 47 mm & Receiver: 46 mm x 46 mm

4 CHANNEL INFRARED REMOTE MODULE – [Link]

DIY Infrared Remote Controls

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by Jason Poel Smith @ makezine.com:

Halloween is the perfect opportunity to create fun special effects. When you want to be able to control props and effects remotely, one good option is to use an infrared remote control. In this project, I’ll show you some simple remote controlled effects that you can set up in your haunted house this year.

DIY Infrared Remote Controls – [Link]

Controlling servo motor using IR remote control

by mohamed soliman @ instructables.com:

If you are looking for comfort and controlling your electronic devices remotely, you will find your need in this instructable.

In this instructable we will learn how to control a servo motor with remote control, this will give you a general concept on how to control remotely. You should know that the remote control sends Infrared(IR) signals, so we will learn how to receive and read these signals using Arduino.

Controlling servo motor using IR remote control – [Link]

Tic-Tac TV Remote Jammer

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by DangerousTim @ instructables.com:

That moment you take your eyes off the TV remote for just a second, because of which it falls into the hands of your annoying sibling. Yes, fighting for control over the TV is a daily struggle for many. But the TV Remote Jammer shown in this Instructable, will make everyone else stop dead in their tracks.

This Remote Jammer circuit, in the disguise of an inconspicuous TicTac Box, sends a constant signal to the TV receiver that interferes with the signal from the TV remote. This means that when the Jammer is on, your TV remote CANNOT be used to change channels. It practically blocks all signals from the remote.

Tic-Tac TV Remote Jammer – [Link]

IR remote tester

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Who never had the need to test a TV or DVD remote?

I have several times. My favorite technique was to take my mobile phone and with the camera pointed at the infrared emitter look for a flashing little purple light. The mobile phone technique is an way for testing the remote but still i decided to make a small circuit just to test the remotes.

IR remote tester – [Link]

SoC Remote Control Platform for IEEE 802.15.4 Standard

The IEEE 802.15.4 standard is the fourth task group of the IEEE 802.15 working group, which defines Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN) standards. The IEEE 802.15.4 market has the following advantages; low power consumption, low cost, low offered message throughput, supports large network orders up to 65k nodes, low to no QoS guarantees, and flexible protocol design suitable for many applications. The purpose for this standard is to empower simple devices with a reliable, robust wireless technology that could last for years on standard primary batteries. It is designed to allow developers to effectively use and benefit from radios based upon the standard.

This reference design is a low cost System-on-Chip (SoC) solution for the IEEE 802.15.4 standard that incorporates a complete, low power, 2.4GHz radio frequency transceiver with TX/RX switch, an 8-bit HCS08 CPU, and a functional set of MCU peripherals into a 48-pin LGA package. This product targets wireless RF remote control and other cost-sensitive applications ranging from home TV and entertainment systems to medical and supports all ZigBee node types. The Freescale’s MC13237 is a highly integrated solution, with very low power consumption. The MC13237 contains an RF transceiver that is an 802.15.4 standard 2006 compliant radio that operates in the 2.4GHz ISM frequency band. The transceiver includes a low noise amplifier, 1mW nominal output Power Amplifier (PA), internal Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO), integrated transmit/receive switch, on-board power supply regulation, 12-bit ADC and full spread-spectrum encoding and decoding.

This design is not only limited for remote controls. It can also be used as the basis for wireless devices and other sensor-controlled application that used IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The IEEE 802.15.4 radios have the potential to be the cost-effective communications backbone for simple sensory mesh networks that can effectively carry data with relatively low latency, high accuracy, and the ability to survive for a very long time on small primary batteries.

SoC Remote Control Platform for IEEE 802.15.4 Standard – [Link]

A four channel remote control using EnOcean Pi

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A four-channel remote control built using the EnOcean Pi by Kerry Wong:

In my last couple of blog posts, I did a brief overview of the EnOcean Pi sensor kit from Newark and demonstrated how to compile and run the example code using a Raspberry Pi. In this blog post, I will show a real world example – a four-channel remote control built using the EnOcean Pi in conjunction with the EnOcean pushbutton module.

[via]

A four channel remote control using EnOcean Pi – [Link]