Tag Archives: Remote

DIY Infrared Remote Controls


by Jason Poel Smith @ makezine.com:

Halloween is the perfect opportunity to create fun special effects. When you want to be able to control props and effects remotely, one good option is to use an infrared remote control. In this project, I’ll show you some simple remote controlled effects that you can set up in your haunted house this year.

DIY Infrared Remote Controls – [Link]

Controlling servo motor using IR remote control

by mohamed soliman @ instructables.com:

If you are looking for comfort and controlling your electronic devices remotely, you will find your need in this instructable.

In this instructable we will learn how to control a servo motor with remote control, this will give you a general concept on how to control remotely. You should know that the remote control sends Infrared(IR) signals, so we will learn how to receive and read these signals using Arduino.

Controlling servo motor using IR remote control – [Link]

Tic-Tac TV Remote Jammer


by DangerousTim @ instructables.com:

That moment you take your eyes off the TV remote for just a second, because of which it falls into the hands of your annoying sibling. Yes, fighting for control over the TV is a daily struggle for many. But the TV Remote Jammer shown in this Instructable, will make everyone else stop dead in their tracks.

This Remote Jammer circuit, in the disguise of an inconspicuous TicTac Box, sends a constant signal to the TV receiver that interferes with the signal from the TV remote. This means that when the Jammer is on, your TV remote CANNOT be used to change channels. It practically blocks all signals from the remote.

Tic-Tac TV Remote Jammer – [Link]

IR remote tester


Who never had the need to test a TV or DVD remote?

I have several times. My favorite technique was to take my mobile phone and with the camera pointed at the infrared emitter look for a flashing little purple light. The mobile phone technique is an way for testing the remote but still i decided to make a small circuit just to test the remotes.

IR remote tester – [Link]

SoC Remote Control Platform for IEEE 802.15.4 Standard

The IEEE 802.15.4 standard is the fourth task group of the IEEE 802.15 working group, which defines Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN) standards. The IEEE 802.15.4 market has the following advantages; low power consumption, low cost, low offered message throughput, supports large network orders up to 65k nodes, low to no QoS guarantees, and flexible protocol design suitable for many applications. The purpose for this standard is to empower simple devices with a reliable, robust wireless technology that could last for years on standard primary batteries. It is designed to allow developers to effectively use and benefit from radios based upon the standard.

This reference design is a low cost System-on-Chip (SoC) solution for the IEEE 802.15.4 standard that incorporates a complete, low power, 2.4GHz radio frequency transceiver with TX/RX switch, an 8-bit HCS08 CPU, and a functional set of MCU peripherals into a 48-pin LGA package. This product targets wireless RF remote control and other cost-sensitive applications ranging from home TV and entertainment systems to medical and supports all ZigBee node types. The Freescale’s MC13237 is a highly integrated solution, with very low power consumption. The MC13237 contains an RF transceiver that is an 802.15.4 standard 2006 compliant radio that operates in the 2.4GHz ISM frequency band. The transceiver includes a low noise amplifier, 1mW nominal output Power Amplifier (PA), internal Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO), integrated transmit/receive switch, on-board power supply regulation, 12-bit ADC and full spread-spectrum encoding and decoding.

This design is not only limited for remote controls. It can also be used as the basis for wireless devices and other sensor-controlled application that used IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The IEEE 802.15.4 radios have the potential to be the cost-effective communications backbone for simple sensory mesh networks that can effectively carry data with relatively low latency, high accuracy, and the ability to survive for a very long time on small primary batteries.

SoC Remote Control Platform for IEEE 802.15.4 Standard – [Link]

A four channel remote control using EnOcean Pi


A four-channel remote control built using the EnOcean Pi by Kerry Wong:

In my last couple of blog posts, I did a brief overview of the EnOcean Pi sensor kit from Newark and demonstrated how to compile and run the example code using a Raspberry Pi. In this blog post, I will show a real world example – a four-channel remote control built using the EnOcean Pi in conjunction with the EnOcean pushbutton module.


A four channel remote control using EnOcean Pi – [Link]

keyMote: a simple wireless remote for computers


by bitsofmymind.com:

To my computer, its simply a USB keyboard, nothing less, but to me its a remote I can use on any platform with no line of sight. I decided to name it the keyMote. Sounds a bit odd to my ears but its a fitting name.

Here is how it works. There are two parts to this system, the remote, which is battery powered, and the base, which is hooked up to a computer. The remote is a simple keypad (In the case of the prototype, its a numeric keypad, but really, it could be any interface) with a transmitter hooked up to it. The base, the other end, is a receiver with USB Human interface device functionality, in other words, a vanilla USB keyboard. When a button is pressed, the remote sends the identifier of that button to the base which then looks up in a table the keystrokes this identifier is mapped to and sends those to the computer via USB. What button is mapped to what keystroke is entirely configurable using a serial terminal interface (shell) to the base. It can be anything, Ctrl-C, Alt-Shift-F, PageUp, etc. Getting it to interface with your program is then simply a matter of configuring keyboard shortcuts.

keyMote: a simple wireless remote for computers – [Link]

Receiver Circuit for Digital Remote Thermometer

This device is a receiver circuit for a Digital Remote Thermometer. The thermometer operates by converting the sensor’s output voltage, which is calibrated and proportional to the measured temperature, to output cycles. The output cycles are transmitted in the supply cables and the receiver section counts the cycles from the transmitter; the calibrated counting are then displayed in the 7-segment LED displays.

The receiver circuit uses the 4093 Quad two input Schmitt NAND Gate IC as one of the logic components. Another component used is the 74HCT4520 dual 4-bit synchronous binary counter which is a high-speed Si-gate CMOS device. It has a dual 4-bit internally synchronous binary counters with an active high clock input and an active low clock input and buffered outputs. In this circuit, only two output levels from each of the binary counters, are utilized and the rest are connected to ground.  The 74HCT4520 is coupled to the 74HCT4017 5‑stage Johnson decade counter for synchronized clocking. The MC14553B 3-digit BCD counter is also used in this circuit. The MC14553B consists of three negative edge triggered BCD Counters that are cascaded synchronously. In this circuit, the MC14553B controls the most significant (leftmost) value of the thermometer display. Lastly, the HEF4511B  BCD to 7-segment BCD decoder is coupled to the MC14553BCP 7-segment displays. The HEF4511B decoder controls each of the displays to indicate the calibrated temperature.

The circuit is ideal for room temperature measurement. It displays the temperature in centigrade within the range of 00.0 to 99.9 degrees centigrade. Adjustments in the circuit are necessary to change the temperature ranges that can be accommodated by the circuit. Continue reading Receiver Circuit for Digital Remote Thermometer

NEC Protocol Infrared remote control with a microcontroller


Gaurav Chaudhary writes:

This little project will demonstrate how you can build NEC protocol based Infrared Remote Control to use with various NEC Protocol IR receivers. actually there are lots of projects out there to accomplish this task but i have to write my own code because of too many requests on this IR(infrared) Remote Control Relay Board with PIC 12F675 Microcontroller people keep asking “Where is the Transmitter for this

Irdroid v2.0 – universal remote for Android

Irdroid v2.0 is advanced version of the Irdroid remote control hardware. The unit is standalone, powered by 12V DC adapter and it has a bluetooth communication module. The unit features a infra-red remote control for android and a Bluetooth Music receiver in one. The module can be used simultaneously to control home TV/AV equipment and to turn any speaker into a wireless bluetooth speakers.

Irdroid v2.0 – universal remote for Android – [Link]