Tag Archives: Sensor

Easy Motion and Gesture Detection by PIR Sensor & Arduino

Here we use PIR sensor and Arduino to detect the motion of a hand. This detection can be used to operate electronic equipment. By ElectroPeak @ hackster.io:

In this article, we’ll show you how to make a gesture detector by simple components like PIR sensor and Arduino Nano. At the end of this article you can:

  • Explain PIR sensor applications and how it works
  • Run an 8-Pixel PIR sensor named TPA81
  • Use PIR sensor to detect motion and gesture by Arduino
  • Make a cool detector to increase or decrease your speaker volume

Easy Motion and Gesture Detection by PIR Sensor & Arduino – [Link]

Touch Screen Thermal Camera with Adjustable Temperature Range

Lenin @ movingelectrons.net writes:

This project was inspired by the Thermal Camera with Display project from Adafruit. Ever since they announced the AMG8833 IR Thermal Sensor, I wanted to use it to build a thermal camera for checking hot spots on electrical panels around the house and looking for rabbit nests in the backyard.

Although the project is very similar to Adafruit’s on the hardware side, I modified the Arduino (C language) code extensively to adapt it to my needs. Some of the added features:

  • Battery status/charge.
  • Min./Max. temperature values represented by light blue areas (min.) and dark red areas (max.) on the LCD screen.
  • Temperature range adjustment by tapping on the screen’s lower right corner. There are 3 temperature ranges to choose from:
    • 28C to 30C
    • 20C to 80C
    • 50C to 100C

When switching between ranges, the min. and max. temperature values are shown on screen.

I’m also including the files of a 3D printed case I designed to hold all components in a relatively small package.

Touch Screen Thermal Camera with Adjustable Temperature Range – [Link]

Using a Soil Moisture Sensor with Arduino

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. Smart farms are becoming very popular as everyone is beginning to see the benefits in terms of crop health and yield and I know a lot of people that will be interested in smart farm automation. That’s why today, we will be looking at how to use a soil moisture sensor with an Arduino to determine the moisture content in the soil.

Soil moisture is generally the amount of water that is held in spaces between soil particles. It’s is a very important factor that determines the growth of crops and their health.

Instead of the old gravimetric method of measuring soil water content, the soil moisture sensor measures the volumetric water content indirectly by using other properties associated with the soil. The soil moisture sensor used for this tutorial uses electrical resistance of the soil to determine the soil humidity. The electrical resistance of the soil reduces with increase in the amount of water in the soil. The electrical resistance in the soil, however, increases with reduction in the amount of water in the soil. The sensor consists of a probe and a comparator with an adjustable potentiometer which can be used to set the sensitivity of the sensor.

Using a Soil Moisture Sensor with Arduino – [Link]

Using a Hall Effect Sensor with Arduino

Hall Effect Sensor

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. Today we will look at how to use a hall effect sensor with Arduino.

A hall effect sensor is a sensor that varies its output based on the presence or absence of a magnetic field. This means that the output signal produced by a Hall effect sensor is a function of magnetic field density around it. When the magnetic flux density around it exceeds a certain pre-set threshold value, the sensor detects it and generates an output voltage sometimes called the hall voltage to indicate the presence of the magnetic field.

Hall sensors are becoming very popular due to their versatility and they are used in many different applications. One of the popular applications of hall effect sensors is in automotive systems where they are used to detect position, measure distance and speed. They are also used in modern devices like smartphones and computers and also used in different type of switches where the presence of a magnetic field is used to either activate or deactivate a circuit.

Using a Hall Effect Sensor with Arduino – [Link]

SGPC3 – Air Quality Sensor for Battery-Driven Applications

Sensirion, the expert in environmental sensing, now offers the ultra-lower power gas sensor SGPC3. The SGPC3 makes indoor air quality sensing available for mobile and battery-driven applications. With an average supply current of less than 0.07 mA the SGPC3 is able to provide indoor air quality measurements with several years of battery lifetime. Based on Sensirion’s SGP multi-pixel platform the SGPC3 offers a complete gas sensor system integrated into a very small 2.45 x 2.45 x 0.9 mm3 DFN package featuring I2C interface and a fully calibrated and humidity-compensated air quality output signal

Sensirion’s MOXSens® Technology provides the SGPC3 with an unmatched robustness against contamination by siloxanes resulting in outstanding long-term stability and accuracy. The combination of ultra-low power consumption and long-term stability makes the SGPC3 the perfect choice for indoor air quality monitoring in mobile and battery-driven smart home applications. Evaluation and testing is supported by application notes and example code; the SGP evaluation kits are also available through Sensirion’s distribution network.

Visit Sensirion’s website to see where you can order the SGPC3 gas sensor or to learn more about its specifications and features: www.sensirion.com

Discover more about the most relevant environmental parameters and Sensirion’s other innovative environmental sensor solutions at www.sensirion.com/environmental-sensing

Air Quality Analyzer

This is a project that analyses home air quality and records the values in a SD card.

The quality of the air that we breathe, is very important to our health. This device analyses the air quality inside our homes, and records the values in a SD card. By analyzing the stored values, we know how the evolution of the parameters thru time was.

I will use temperature, humidity and air quality sensors that are cheap enough to use in this kind of project, without sacrificing too much the precision. The main idea behind this project is to know if the air is breathable or not.

Air Quality Analyzer – [Link]

HDC2010 – Low Power Humidity and Temperature Sensor

The HDC2010 is an integrated humidity and temperature sensor that provides high accuracy measurements with very low power consumption, in an ultra-compact WLCSP (Wafer Level Chip Scale Package). The sensing element of the HDC2010 is placed on the bottom part of the device, which makes the HDC2010 more robust against dirt, dust, and other environmental contaminants. The capacitive-based sensor includes new integrated digital features and a heating element to dissipate condensation and moisture. The HDC2010 digital features include programmable interrupt thresholds to provide alerts/system wakeups without requiring a microcontroller to be continuously monitoring the system. This, combined with programmable sampling intervals, low inherent power consumption, and support for 1.8V supply voltage, make the HDC2010 well suited for battery-operated systems.

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Acconeer 3D Pulsed Coherent Radar sensors

Acconeer’s A111 radar sensor is based on a unique patented technology enabling millimeter accuracy with very low power consumption

The Acconeer A111 is a low power, high precision 60 GHz pulsed SRD radar sensor with a footprint of 29 mm2, delivered in one chip system in package (SiP) solution with embedded RF and antenna. The small size and the low power consumption make it suitable for integration into any mobile or portable battery driven device.

The A111 radar sensor is based on a unique patented technology enabling millimeter accuracy with very low power consumption. The 60 GHz unlicensed ISM band provides robustness not compromised by any natural source of interference, such as noise, dust, color, direct or indirect light, and easy integration with no need of an aperture. The A111 radar sensor detects multiple objects at close range with single measurements as well as continuous sweeps set to any frequency rate up to 1500 Hz. Additionally, the unique characteristics of the radar sensor enable material recognition and motion detection for advanced sensing applications.

Features

  • Millimeter accuracy – distance mm accuracy for one or multiple objects
  • Movement and speed measurement – continuous measurements up to 1500 Hz
  • Material identification – distinguish between materials with different dielectric constant
  • Microwatt – enables integration into any battery driven device
  • Optimized integration – small one chip solution with embedded RF and antenna solution that requires no need for aperture
  • Robustness – not compromised by any natural source of interference, such as noise, dust, color, direct or indirect light

Newly Developed Internal Temperature Sensor For Li-ion Battery Enables 5x Faster Charging

Researchers at the University of Warwick in the UK have developed sensors which measure the internal temperature and electrode potential of Lithium batteries. The technology is being developed by the Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG) as a part of a battery’s normal operation. More intense testings have been done on standard commercially available automotive battery cells.

Researchersdeveloped a sensor to measure the internal termperature and electrode potential of lithum batterry
Researchers developed a sensor to measure the internal temperature and electrode potential of lithium battery

If a battery overheats it becomes a risk for critical damage to the electrolyte, breaking down to form gases that are both flammable and can cause significant pressure build-up inside the battery. On the other hand, overcharging of the anode can lead to Lithium electroplating, forming a metallic crystalline structure that can cause internal short circuits and fires. So, overcharging and overheating of a Li-ion battery is hugely damaging to the battery along with the user.

The researchers at Warwick developed miniature reference electrodes and Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) threaded through a strain protection layer. An outer coat of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) was applied over the fiber, ensuring chemical protection from the corrosive electrolyte. The end result is a sensor which has direct contact with all the key components of the battery. The sensor can withstand electrical, chemical and mechanical stress faced during the normal operation of the battery while still giving accurate temperature and potential readings of the electrodes.

The device includes an in-situ reference electrode coupled with an optical fiber temperature sensor. The researchers are confident that similar techniques can also be developed for use in pouch cells. WMG Associate Professor Dr. Rohit Bhagat said,

This method gave us a novel instrumentation design for use on commercial 18650 cells that minimizes the adverse and previously unavoidable alterations to the cell geometry,

The data from these internal sensors are much more precise than external sensing. This has been shown that with the help of these new sensors, Lithium batteries that are available today could be charged at least five times faster than the current rates of charging.

This could bring huge benefits to areas such as motor racing, gaining crucial benefits from being able to push the performance limits. This new technology also creates massive opportunities for consumers and energy storage providers.

IDT Announces High Performance MEMS Relative Humidity & Temperature Sensor

California based company, Integrated Device Technology (IDT) has recently announced their new HS300x family of MEMS high-performance relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors of dimension 3.0 × 2.41 × 0.8 mm DFN-style 6-pin LGA. Currently, there are four devices in this family—the HS3001, HS3002, HS3003, and HS3004. They are all the same from the view of functionality but differ slightly in terms of the accuracy of their relative humidity and temperature measurements.

Development board for ITD MEMs sensors

The highlighted feature of this new lineup is that they do not require any user calibration. HS300x family of ICs has calibration and compensation logic integrated into the devices. These ICs output their fully corrected data using standard I2C protocols making the measured data from the sensors is rather easy.

As a side note, Relative humidity (RH) is the ratio of the partial pressure of water vapor to the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at a given temperature. As the entire output consists of only four bytes of data, calculating the corresponding relative humidity in percent and temperature in degrees Celsius is very easy.

Although the HS300x sensors operate as slave devices on the I2C bus (supporting clock frequencies from 100 kHz to 400 kHz), only one HS300x IC can be connected directly to a single I2C bus. To connect multiple sensors to a single I2C bus, an I2C multiplexer/switch has to be used. It would have been easier if IDT had dedicated the unused pin as an optional I2C address input bit, which would allow two HS300x devices to be connected to a single I2C bus.

If you’re interested in testing these ICs prior to incorporating them into a design, SDAH01 or SDAH02 evaluation kit can come handy. Although both kits utilize the HS3001 sensor, the SDAH01 kit outputs the measured data to a PC while the SDAH02 displays the data on an LCD screen.