Tag Archives: Sensor

Open Board for 3D Gesture Control, Motion Capturing, Tracking and Robotics

Next Industries show off The Tactigon: the perfect link between humans or objects and the digital world, with its IMU 3D features, environmental sensors and Bluetooth 4.0 technology.

The Tactigon is a unique platform, programmable with Arduino IDE and expandable with GPS, LoRa or SIGFOX communication add on; it’s made for unlimited applications both in the industrial  and in the consumer IoT worlds.  Action, gesture, motion, and  robots can be kept under control through a  wearable,  small but powerful electronic board. It is small, rectangular, with a lot of sensors inside, wireless, low power consumption and also wearable. With the above mentioned six features, this device is the perfect tool to test ideas and bring projects to life. The Tactigon measures linear and angular motion through 3 axis gyroscope and 3 axis accelerometer; an extra 3 axis magnetic sensor is included to provide more precision. Environmental sensors are on board, so temperature and barometric pressure data recording can be easily provided, like also out of the box communication through low energy Bluetooth 4.0, and optional available GPS, SIGFOX and LoRa.

Open Board for 3D Gesture Control, Motion Capturing, Tracking and Robotics – [Link]

Tri-axis sensor embeds pedometer

Susan Nordyk @ edn.com discuss about the Kionix’s accelerometer with integrated pedometer.

The K126 16-bit tri-axis digital accelerometer from Kionix integrates a step detector and step counter, yet minimizes power consumption. Housed in a tiny 2×2×0.9-mm LGA package, the K126 offers user-selectable g ranges of ±2 g, ±4 g, and ±8 g and output data rates of up to 25.6 kHz.

Tri-axis sensor embeds pedometer – [Link]

Air Quality Sensors on tindie.com

Pesky Products @ tindie.com writes:

This is a small (17.9 mm x 10.3 mm) breakout board with Bosch’s BME280 pressure, temperature, and humidity sensor as well as AMS’ CCS811 digital gas sensor. The sensors work in concert to provide a complete measurement via I2C register reads of indoor air quality including temperature- and humidity-compensated estimates of equivalent CO2 concentration in parts per million (400 – 8192 ppm) and volatile organic chemical concentration in parts per billion (0 – 1187 ppb).

Air Quality Sensors on tindie.com – [Link]

Twiz – Tiny Wireless IMUs

Tiny Wireless IMUs – 100% open & autonomous 9DoF motion sensor using BLE to control anything from your [objects] motion ! by Drix @ hackaday.io:

We looked for tiny, autonomous, easy to use, and 9 Degrees of Freedom IMU, but none of the available wireless motion sensors were affordable enough to really unlock creativity, so we built one.

Twiz – Tiny Wireless IMUs – [Link]

Dual die, Hall effect, latch and switch sensor is accurate & redundant

Graham Prophet @ eedesignnewseurope.com discuss about Melexis magnetic latch and switch sensors. He writes:

Melexis (Tessenderlo, Belgium) has introduced a range of new magnetic latch and switch sensors that feature two silicon dice in the same package, yielding highly reliable devices, which are aimed at automotive applications including transmission, power steering, braking and locks/latches.

Dual die, Hall effect, latch and switch sensor is accurate & redundant – [Link]

LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

RodNewHampshire @ instructables.com writes:

The LoRa IOT Home Environmental Monitoring System consists of an Arduino Mega based IOT-to-Internet gateway and Arduino Feather based remote stations with environmental sensors. The remote stations communicate wirelessly with the gateway using LoRa radios.

LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System – [Link]

Easy IoT Weather Station With Multiple Sensors

Ingenerare @ instructables.com show us an easy to build IoT weather station able to measure temperature, dew point, humidity, pressure, light index, and rain. He writes:

A weather station is a fun project that teaches you a ton about electronics with the added benefit being an actually useful little device. The project requires a bunch of cheap parts and sensors totaling less than $15, and the whole thing ends up fitting in your hand. The station creates a web site that monitors temperature, dew point, humidity, pressure, light index, and rain (Thingspeak channel). It’s a pretty easy set up, and you’ll just need some basic electronics skills to get it going.

Easy IoT Weather Station With Multiple Sensors – [Link]

Smallest seismic sensor uses vibration spectral analysis

Graham Prophet @ eedesignnewseurope.com discuss about a new small seismic sensor from Omron:

Omron Electronic Components believes it has the world’s smallest class size seismic sensor, specifically designed to trigger the shutdown of potentially hazardous or easily damaged systems in the event of an earthquake.

Smallest seismic sensor uses vibration spectral analysis – [Link]

The First and Only Long-Term Stable Metal-Oxide Gas Sensor

At this year’s Sensor+Test 2017 in Nuremberg (May 30 – June 1), Sensirion AG, the expert in environmental and flow sensor solutions, introduces the SGP – the first and only long-term stable metal-oxide gas sensor.

The SGP gas sensor is based on Sensirion’s multi-pixel platform, which integrates four gas sensing elements into a very small 2.45 x 2.45 x 0.9 mm3 DFN package featuring a fully calibrated air quality output signal. The unprecedented combination of long-term stability and multi-pixel technology opens up new possibilities for environmental monitoring in smart home, appliances and Internet of Things applications. Thanks to its unique performance, the SGP allows for the first time the integration of metal-oxide gas sensors into mobile devices.

The First and Only Long-Term Stable Metal-Oxide Gas Sensor – [Link]

Increasing Battery Life With UB20M Voltage Detector

Engineers at the University of Bristol have developed a three terminal pico-power chip that can cut standby drain in sensor nodes – even compared with today’s low-power microcontrollers.

It does this by replacing the low duty-cycle sleep-wake-sleep pattern used on MCU-based sensor monitors, with ‘off’. A voltage detector powered by the sensor – there is no other power source –  starts the processor when the sensor produces a voltage.

At 5pA (20°C 1V), power draw from the sensor through the input/supply pin is so low that the chip can directly interface with high-impedance sensors such as antennas, piezo-electric accelerometers, or photodiodes. With so little current required, the chip does not collapse the sensor voltage.

“It will work from five infra-red diodes in series, powered from a TV remote control 5m away, or an un-powered accelerometer”, Bristol engineer Bernard Stark told Electronics Weekly.

Called UB20M, the only power it draws from the system is 100pA(max) leakage through its open drain output transistor. Input threshold is set at 0.6V.

Once the sensor presents greater than 0.6V to the input, the output FET turns on (RDSon~800Ω), and its low resistance can either be used to turn on a p-FET to power up a microcontroller, or can wake a microcontroller from sleep.

In an extreme application example, said the University, an earthquake detector could be held in sleep for years, until a tremor caused the chip to wake its host.

Despite its impedance and sensitivity, the device can withstand 20V on its input/supply pin, and it has ESD protection. Maximum output pin parameters are 5.5V 7mA. Output turn-on time is 0.25μs, while turn-off depends on load resistance and capacitance – typically 8μs with a 5MΩ load and 180μs with 100MΩ.

Because patents are pending, exactly how the chip works is not being disclosed. It has around 40 transistors, and is made on a 180nm CMOS process, is all Stark could say.

Samples are available – through a multi-project wafer deal with Europractice and IMEC, fabricated at AMS in Austria, and the University has created an evaluation board. Due to Europractice and IMEC going the extra mile, said Stark, samples are in SOT323-5 rather than clunky research packages.

The team cautions that anyone trying the chip will need to understand high-impedance circuits, as otherwise stray mains fields, for example, will trigger it continuously and the output transistor will remain on. Lengthy sensor connections should be avoided.

In general, the sensor has to be connected to the input/supply pin with enough parallel resistance to leak away stray charge and ensure the UB20M turns off.

“We are now working on ways of bringing other power drains such as data-capture, computation, and transmission, to within the nW-power budget of a sensor, completely eliminating batteries from sensor nodes,” said the University. “An example of this (right) is where power management with a few tens of nW quiescent is actively matching its input impedance to an 80MΩ energy harvester with 10 ms intermittent output pulses.”

UB20M data sheet and eval board details can be reached from this introductory web page, and there is an introductory video.

Source: Electronics Weekly