Tag Archives: Servo

RC Servo Driver 0-5V


0 – 5V Servo Controller project will control a hobby type servo motor connected to it via a preset or external DC source.  This kit will be ideal add on in animatronics and motion control application.

This is a simple but a useful circuit to control a single servo motor.  Its an ideal add on to a RC Hobbyist tool kit. The DC input to this circuit should be 5 to 6 VDC.  DC signal is given to this board at connector marked CN1 (+V and GND).   You can also feed in a variable DC signal source at the other two pins on this connector to control the servo.  To use this signal source you need to place the Jumper link at J1 in the E position.  Alternatively, you can also control the servo motor by preset PR1 mounted on the PCB.  For this you need to place the Jumper link in the I position at J1.A Servo motor is connected at connector marked CN2 on the PCB.  This connector has all the pins clearly marked for connection to the servo.LED D1 is a power on indicator ,  Diode D2 provides a reverse polarity protection for the Microcontroller.


  • Microcontroller based design for greater flexibility and ease of control
  • Single Servo control via clearly marked berg connector
  • Clearly marked jumper to select signal source to control the Servo
  • Onboard preset for ready to control option for this kit
  • Power-on LED indicator
  • Diode protection for reverse polarity connection of DC supply to the PCB
  • Four mounting holes 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 45 mm x 32 mm

RC Servo Driver 0-5V – [Link]

Control servo motors with potentiometers and Arduino


by break_it_fix_it @ instructables.com:

I needed to be able to control 3 different servo motors by altering the position of 3 potentiometers. There are lots of people out there doing things like this, but I couldn’t find an exact match for everything I needed, so I decided to post up this instructable to bring everything I learned together in one place so that anyone else who wanted to do something like this could get it up and running quickly. This instructable is really a summary of other peoples excellent work and effort.

Control servo motors with potentiometers and Arduino – [Link]

Double RC servo tester with OLED display


Dan blogged about his Servo tester with OLED display project:

The problem is simple: I need to have a reliable and easy to use servo tester, that I can use to test/play with a standard RC servo or ESC or anything else that uses the same control protocol. This necessity has arisen again quite recently, while working on the 2nd iteration of my ball balancing device.

Double RC servo tester with OLED display – [Link]

Feeling the light in a whole new way


by Mark (Moonyoung) Lee & Kevin J. Wang:

What is seeing without feeling? The field of Virtual Reality has recently been gaining much attention, with the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard paving the path of visualizing a world that is not physically there. But what if the virtual reality experience could be enhanced by incorporating tactile sensing? The Haptic Glove we developed accomplishes just that – without seeing the physical structure of the object, you will still be able to feel the presence of virtual objects.

The goal of the project is to create an exoskeleton on the forearm arm that provides tactile perception for the user. The volume of the virtual object will be emulated based on the intensity of a light source that is placed inside a black box. Depending on the relative brightness of the source to the phototransistors that are mounted onto the exoskeleton, a distance between the user’s hand and the light source can be determined. By varying the brightness of the LED light source, the size of the virtual object will vary. To provide the tactile perception, servos mounted on the exoskeleton provides a pulling force, preventing the user’s fingers from reaching closer to the light source. In addition to the resistive force that act against the fingers’ movement, there are also flat surfaces at the tips of the exoskeleton that will flip up to make contact with the user’s fingers, which actually provides the sense of touching a real object.

Feeling the light in a whole new way – [Link]

Circuit Fun: Control an RC Servo with an adjustable DC voltage

by w2aew @ youtube.com:

This video shows a simple circuit that can be used to control the position of an typical remote control (RC) style servo with an analog voltage. The PWM (pulse width modulated) control signal format for an RC servo is reviewed, followed by the presentation of a simple circuit that can be used to control the servo with a simple adjustable DC voltage. The circuit is built with rail-to-rail op amps and a few resistors and capacitors. Note that the schematic presented doesn’t include all of the decoupling on the power supply and reference lines that you would likely want to include. A description of the circuit, as well as a more in depth discussion of each of the building blocks such as an integrator, hysteresis comparator and DC signal conditioner circuit including an attenuator, inverting amplifier and level shifter, is presented.

Circuit Fun: Control an RC Servo with an adjustable DC voltage – [Link]

Wireless servo controller II


Ondřej Karas of DoItWireless writes:

We described simple method, how to drive modellers servo. Today, we are going to try to drive this servo from potentiometer connected to TR module ADC. It is reaction to forum thread where is discussion about airplane model control possibility.


Wireless servo controller II – [Link]

AMP – Arachnoid Mobile Platform


The Arachnoid Mobile Platform is an open source robotics development platform used to make small autonomous moving robots. It can be either configured as a four-legged robot, or as a two wheeled robot. The PCB board holds all the electronics and mechanical components, and also serves as the chassis of the robot.

AMP – Arachnoid Mobile Platform – [Link]

Reflow toaster oven using an Arduino

Ray Wang writes:

Hi, I recently built a reflow toaster oven using an Arduino. I know it’s pretty standard stuff, but my version has an automatic oven door opener (using a servo) and circulation fan to speed up the cooling time, and remote notification using an RF transmitter


Reflow toaster oven using an Arduino – [Link]

Simple Servo Tester


Gadget Gangster @ instructables.com writes:

A little bigger than a postage stamp, the Simple Servo Tester lets you control two digital or analog servos without using a transmitter or receiver, just plug in your battery pack to start testing.

Use it to check your servos before installing them into your models or to center your servos when setting up linkages. The Simple Servo Tester can also be tuned to precisely center your servos – Some manufactures consider 1.520 milliseconds to be center while others use 1.500 milliseconds.

Simple Servo Tester – [Link]