Tag Archives: SMD

Single Channel SMD Relay Driver


Single Channel Relay Board is a simple and convenient way to interface a relay for switching application in your project.


  •     Input supply 12VDC @ 42 mA
  •     On Board 5V Regulator provides 5V output
  •     Output SPDT Relay
  •     Relay specification 5 A @ 230 VAC
  •     Trigger level 2 ~ 9 VDC
  •     Header connector for connecting power and trigger voltage
  •     Relay operations status LED
  •     Power LED
  •     Tiny Design
  •     Screw terminal connector for easy relay output connections

Single Channel SMD Relay Driver – [Link]

Surface-mount device prototyping in education


In this article Vassilis K. Papanikolaou explains how SMD prototyping practice can be used in learning environments using simple and wide available tools and equipment:

A feasibility study is herein attempted, towards the adaptation of modern surface-mount device (SMD) prototyping practice to learning environments. This necessity emerges not only from the profound advantages of the above technology (e.g. component size, availability, low cost etc.) but also from the fact that contemporary designs often require special board layout considerations, which may be incompatible with through-hole components. In addition, the long process between prototyping and product finalization can be greatly shortened. Nevertheless, the employment of surface-mount techniques in education may be discouraged by both the unappealing part sizes (i.e. handling difficulty) and the excessive cost of commercial supporting equipment. The main objective of this study is to suggest practical and low-cost solutions for all different SMD prototyping/manufacturing stages, which can demystify and render this procedure welcome and easily applicable in laboratory classes.

Surface-mount device prototyping in education – [Link]

Making A SMD Reflow Oven


by packetbob @ instructables.com:

I decided to put together a toaster oven and wanted something that could handle large boards and possibly do small production runs. Doing a web search, you will find many options for toaster oven reflow controllers. They range from one-off designs to DIY boards to full kits. A large number of them are Arduino based. Some controllers just allow the oven to plug in (so you don’t need to take the oven apart) while others integrate completely inside the oven (more work but a much better product in the end).

Making A SMD Reflow Oven – [Link]

An SMD 4 digit 7 segment DIY display

2015-04-02 04.10.41

by blog.esai.pw:

I was designing an electronic clock to see time easier at night. And while at it, I came up with a nice idea:

Having used a lot of perfboards(dot pcb) to prototype my projects, I thought of a way to make a 7 segment display out of smd leds. Making a segment out of 2 common grounded leds..
I stumbled upon it while trying to determine a nice size for my clock. I drew a mask on perfboard with a marker. Later I redrew it and cut it out:

An SMD 4 digit 7 segment DIY display – [Link]

Readily usable LED for exceptional price


SosElectronics offers you simply applicable solution of a power LED on a thermal clad in a special offer! 


  • power white SMD LED Luxeon Rebel
  • luminous flux min. 100 lm / 350 mA
  • specified to continuous 700 mA / 3,2 V
  • made on a ceramic base with electrically insulated thermal pad
  • guaranteed lumen maintanance 70% of original value at 50 000 hrs / 700mA / Tj 135°C
  • low moisture sensitivity – JEDEC Level 1
  • dimensions: 4,61 x 3,17 x 2,10 mm


  • thermal clad for Lumileds Luxeon Rebel
  • optimal heat transfer from LED to heatsink
  • longer LED lifetime and luminosity thanks to a lower operating temperature
  • star board
  • easy application

Readily usable LED for exceptional price – [Link]



by Rusivan @ instructables.com:

In this article I will try to tell you about the gift I made for my girlfriend!

The basis of the scheme is a microcontroller Atmega8, 1K resistor, selected in such a way as not to overload the microcontroller ports. SMD resistors and diodes, size 1206.

On the reverse side of the board, there are two batteries CR2032, two capacitors, voltage regulator LM7805, and the power button with latching.

DIY SMD LED heart – [Link]

The SMD beak

2015-02-03 17.49.33

Vassilis over vpapanik.blogspot.gr has build a nice and simple tool to help him soldering tiny SMD parts on a PCB. The tool consists of three metal parts you can easily find on your parts box and it can be proven to be really helpful as it keeps the SMD parts steady while you solder them. The build is easy, all you have to do is to bend the main rod, file the tip to conical shape and drill the other two rods. All steps can be done in under 30 minutes without special tools. Sure it can be your third hand while assembling your PCBs. He writes:

I ordered this awesome N|Watch kit the other day, which requires some serious SMD hand-soldering skills. There’s always the easy alternative to use a reflow oven, but guess what, there is no stencil included (and no, I don’t have a paste dispenser). In a desperate need of a third hand (!) in order do a neat job, I saw some similar DIY solutions (thumbs up for Google images) and managed to build my own version in less than 30 minutes, just using junk metal parts : the SMD beak !

The SMD beak – [Link]

IV9 & IV16 tube numitron clock


by Alan @ kalshagar.wikispaces.com:

I found those beautiful vintage IV9 & IV16 tubes and I had to use them, clock being the perfect candidate. I made already mutliple others based on what was supposed to be a WordClock (hence the project name) only, but became more diversified. I did also a first test with a chainable 5cm x 5cm tube board, this is a 5cm x 10cm dual board improved version.

When I made this project and designed it the idea I had was of course the design (very important) but also reusability and pragmaticallity regarding the components used. What I mean by the latest is that you never really know what component you’ll have at hand, depends on your provider, the component availability, it’s price, or even the package DIP or SMD. Hence the board can work with 3 different type of RTC clocks: just use your favorite or the one in your shelf stock. Personally I love the Maxims DS3231 and DS3234 which are temperature compensated (to a fantastic extend for the DS3234), and both are accessed through different protocols: SPI for the DS3234 and TWI for DS3231. There’s also the EPSON RTC4543 for those living in Japan like me. So again depending of what else you need to wire, choose your poison: all the pins of the MCU are accessible and there’s even a small zone for some DIP components.
The top board uses 74HC595 for maintaining the displayed digits: they come very cheap but I didn’t want to be stuck to the DIP or SMD model (having both in stock), so the board can use any of the two. Same goes with the current limiter resistors: SMD, through hole or even resistor array, your pick. And of course there’s a SMD or DIP led footprint under each tube for the blingbling! (single color, not RGB led)

IV9 & IV16 tube numitron clock – [Link]

Print Your Own Circuit Boards and Reflow SMD Components with the Voltera V-One


by Mike Senese @ makezine.com:

Typically when electrical engineers wants to make a new circuitboard, they need to send their design files to a manufacturer and wait for it to be produced and mailed back. Hardware startup Voltera aims to expedite this process by putting it in on your desk with its V-One consumer circuit board printer.

Print Your Own Circuit Boards and Reflow SMD Components with the Voltera V-One – [Link]

Reflow Soldering Controller


by pleasantsoftware.com:

This is reflow soldering controller for use with a toaster oven as reflow soldering oven.

I bought the toaster oven in a local super market for about 40 €. There was also a cheaper oven on sale, but I wasn’t sure if it did 250°C, so I bought the more expensive and prettier one.

Since I don’t want to loose the warranty and also haven’t any interest of the oven’s internals, I designed the reflow controller as an oven-external device which directly switches the oven’s mains on/off.

The relay I use is for 6V, but it seems to work just fine with the 5V supply from the ATtiny. On the mains side, the relay is rated for 230V/16A.

The whole controller is based on a ATtiny 45 µController. I use one pin as input for the 100k thermistor for temperature measurement (connected to JP3), one pin controls the mains relay (via a BC140 transistor), one pin controls a LED for feedback and one pin is connected to a switch for user input.

Reflow Soldering Controller – [Link]