Tag Archives: Soldering

Making A SMD Reflow Oven

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by packetbob @ instructables.com:

I decided to put together a toaster oven and wanted something that could handle large boards and possibly do small production runs. Doing a web search, you will find many options for toaster oven reflow controllers. They range from one-off designs to DIY boards to full kits. A large number of them are Arduino based. Some controllers just allow the oven to plug in (so you don’t need to take the oven apart) while others integrate completely inside the oven (more work but a much better product in the end).

Making A SMD Reflow Oven – [Link]

DIY soldering station

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MatthiasW over at DebuggingLab posted his DIY Weller station clone project, that is available at Github:

At the fpv-community.de Forum I read about a DIY Weller station. Basically an Arduino shield to drive a Weller soldering tip. As there is not much to it, the board simply contains an precision OpAmp, a power MOSFET, 2 buttons for adjusting the temperature and a display to show the current values. This design looks like a good starting point for my own advanced project. As I have lately discovered a 1,8 inch SPI TFT at banggood.com for an amazing price ( ~ 4.60 $ / 3,70 €), I started using them regularly in my projects. So I surely wanted to use it with this soldering station as well.

DIY soldering station – [Link]

Universal soldering controller

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sparkybg shared his universal soldering controller:

The intention was to build the most universal soldering controller I can think of. It can drive any low voltage (upto 24V) iron with thermocouple or resistive sensor, in series with the heater, or separate.
Here is a short list of features:
– power: 9-28V, AC or DC
– 2 separate heater control channels
– 2 independent sensor inputs
– current source on any sensor input 3uA – 12mA, wuth 2 bands (x1, x16) and 256 steps per band
– flexible differential amplifier input selection
– amplifier gain from 0 to 750 in 256 steps
– negative offset selection in 1024 steps
– resistive instrument identification (upto 625 different instruments can be identified by 2 resistors on the connector)
– polynomial floating point voltage/resistance to temperature calculation
– wave shaping to filter out the inductive peaks from series sensor signal
– PID control with power limit
– isolated USB port for firmware updates and live data
– 128×64 OLED display with rich user interface.

Universal soldering controller – [Link]

DIY WMRP-Solder Station

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Features:

  • low offset op amp for soldering tip temperature measurement with type c thermocouple
  • cold junction compensation using the PTC (KTY82-210) included in the WMRP soldering pencil
  • input voltage measurement (for use with 3 cell lipo battery)
  • soldering pencil current measurement
  • recognizing if the soldering pencil rests in the stand (–> standby)
  • 3 buttons for save and recall temperature values
  • rotary encoder to set soldering temperature
  • illuminated 16×2 character LCD module
  • USB for debugging and firmware update
  • clean and small enclosure
  • 4mm safety

DIY WMRP-Solder Station – [Link]

DIY soldering robot

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Here’s Brian Dorey’s completed project the DIY soldering robot project:

The DIY soldering robot which we have been building in our spare time over the past few months is now working and we have been able to solder some test Raspberry Pi expansion board headers with the machine.

DIY soldering robot – [Link]

Soldering Robot – Head Assembly

Brian Dorey writes about his soldering robot project:

We have finished the soldering iron element slider system and stepper mount for the new soldering robot project.
The soldering iron element slides on a pair or 6mm rails, drylin® accessories, precision aluminium shaft 100mm length (part no: AWMP-06) with drylin® R – Bearings (part no: RJZM-01-06) from www.igus.co.uk which are mounted into milled 6mm aluminium plates. These are bolted to a 4mm aluminium base which has slots milled to allow it to be mounted onto a horizontal frame above the board to be soldered. The design files for the head assembly can be download in PDF format Download PDF

Soldering Robot – Head Assembly – [Link]

 

The SMD beak

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Vassilis over vpapanik.blogspot.gr has build a nice and simple tool to help him soldering tiny SMD parts on a PCB. The tool consists of three metal parts you can easily find on your parts box and it can be proven to be really helpful as it keeps the SMD parts steady while you solder them. The build is easy, all you have to do is to bend the main rod, file the tip to conical shape and drill the other two rods. All steps can be done in under 30 minutes without special tools. Sure it can be your third hand while assembling your PCBs. He writes:

I ordered this awesome N|Watch kit the other day, which requires some serious SMD hand-soldering skills. There’s always the easy alternative to use a reflow oven, but guess what, there is no stencil included (and no, I don’t have a paste dispenser). In a desperate need of a third hand (!) in order do a neat job, I saw some similar DIY solutions (thumbs up for Google images) and managed to build my own version in less than 30 minutes, just using junk metal parts : the SMD beak !

The SMD beak – [Link]

Reflow Soldering Controller

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by pleasantsoftware.com:

This is reflow soldering controller for use with a toaster oven as reflow soldering oven.

I bought the toaster oven in a local super market for about 40 €. There was also a cheaper oven on sale, but I wasn’t sure if it did 250°C, so I bought the more expensive and prettier one.

Since I don’t want to loose the warranty and also haven’t any interest of the oven’s internals, I designed the reflow controller as an oven-external device which directly switches the oven’s mains on/off.

The relay I use is for 6V, but it seems to work just fine with the 5V supply from the ATtiny. On the mains side, the relay is rated for 230V/16A.

The whole controller is based on a ATtiny 45 µController. I use one pin as input for the 100k thermistor for temperature measurement (connected to JP3), one pin controls the mains relay (via a BC140 transistor), one pin controls a LED for feedback and one pin is connected to a switch for user input.

Reflow Soldering Controller – [Link]

Kristall 511 solder wire won´t dirt your PCB

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Innovative flux and a high qualty alloy provide to Stannol Kristall 511 solder wire excellent processing properties with a minimum of clean transprarent residues.

You, who are at production of electronic devices, know, how important is a choice of a suitable solder. A designer of a given device might not focus on a solder used at soldering of the first protoype, bu tin a production it will manifest itself – sooner or later. Not that some solder would be miraculous and otherone unusable, but each one is suitable for something else.

Similarly lie in other segments, even here are some exceptions, when by using the newest materials and know-how from development of solders exist types suitable for multiple applications. One of them is solder Kristall511 Ecoloy with an innovative flux based on synthetic resins. The result is a small spatter and clean, transparent residues, which don´t influence electrical properties of a PCB, i.e. they belong to a “No clean” category – they can stay on a PCB withot cleaning. Kristall 511 is a considerably active solder and it shows its strength even at surfaces with not that optimal solderability and also there, where it´s necessary to solder quickly (for example components that are exceptionally sensitive to temperature). KRISTALL 511 was developed for automated soldering of SMT components, as well as for hand soldering and rework.

This way Stannol, as a producer with rich experience in development of solders (from 1920), produced a combinatio of an alloy+flux with properties meeting majority of requirements of production:

  • small amount of transparent residues
  • excellent spreading even at poorly solderable sorfaces (copper, brass, nickel,…)
  • highly active
  • electrically safe residues
  • low spitting
  • mild odour and small amount of fumes

On stock we have two novelties KRISTALL 511 Sn95,5Ag3,8Cu0,7 (593132) (diameter 1mm, 500g) and KRISTALL 511 Sn96,5Ag3,0Cu0,5 (810050) (diameter 1mm, 500g) solder wires. Technical details can be found in the Kristall_511 datasheet.


Kristall 511 solder wire won´t dirt your PCB – [Link]

Mini Fluxer will spread solder there, where you want

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… and will prevent to spread there, where you don´t want to. Fluxes in pen Stannol series Mini Fluxer belong to the invaluable helpers of every electro-technician.

How could I work without a flux so far? That´s a probable question of probably everyone, who once tried action of a solder flux. In a common wire solder, there´s some amount of a flux, usually sufficient for one-time soldering of a given joint, if the components to be soldered are clean and oxides-free. However, we know well a case, when we use for example an older PCB, or an older component with slightly oxidized leads and suddenly it´s much harder to reach an acceptable joint. Similar situation happens at an exchange of a component or any service action, when a solder tends to oxidize on a surface and create various bad-looking creatures, which are quite far from a professional joint. Fortunately, there´s a flux here …

In general, fluxes act in a manner, that a solder is as if „more movable“ after application. It is mainly thanks to the protection against oxidation, change of surface tension and other influences. As a result it means, that a solder spreads well on metals and joints with a given material (what we naturally want) and on the non-metal substances (PCB) is a solder repelled as if on an oily surface.

At an automated „all-surface“ soldering, fluxes are usually applied by wetting (foam) or by spraying. At development and servicing smaller packages are much more practical, for example in a form of a pen. Two novelties in our offer also belong to this category:

  • Stannol MINI-FLUXER X32-10i – halogen free, activated „No clean“ flux, practically residue-free, vey tolerant to various working conditions. Minimum amount of electrically safe transparent residues with a high insulation resistance enables its usage even at visible places and at production of highly reliable devices, including solar panels. Significantly eliminates build-up of bridges, that´s why it´s very suitable even for manual soldering of fine-pitch components.
  • Stannol MINI-FLUXER X33S-07i – highly activated halogen-free „No clean“, resin-free flux, with a corrosion inhibitor, very suitable even for copper surfaces – clean, passivated or lacquered by rosin-based agents. Excellent wetting even on poorly adherent surfaces. Excellent spreading manifests by for example trouble-free filling of vias by a solder.

Stainless steel spring mechanism of a pen enables simple and precise dosage and also a long pen lifetime. During application, it´s only necessary to softly press on the tip. Both fluxes are in our stable stock offer, available immediately or in a short leadtime (in case of a temporary out-of -stock status).

Detailed information will provide you the Stannol-X32-10i and Stannol-X33S-07i datasheets.


Mini Fluxer will spread solder there, where you want – [Link]