Tag Archives: Soldering

Top-level Weller soldering stations for even better prices


Now even you can afford the best, what´s available on the field of soldering and service.

A fact, that we also try to transform better purchasing conditions on You – our customers, we´ve already mentioned to you few times in our articles. This time we have this pleasant occasion to make so at soldering equipment from company Weller. The biggest change happened at components, which are usually the most costly – at soldering (and desoldering) stations.

The result is lower price at all Weller stations, which are our standard stock items – in majority of cases in 15-20%, what makes up to 200-300 Eur discount at the most expensive types.

It´s still actual, that within 1-2 weeks we´re able to supply you practically any Weller component (which we don´t keep in stock). In our offer can also be found selected types of original soldering tips and any other types can be supplied to you in a short leadtime and at convenient conditions.

So where to start? Probably best by having a look at the Weller catalogue. Our previous articles may also give you an inspiration.

Top-level Weller soldering stations for even better prices – [Link]

Surface-mount device prototyping in education


In this article Vassilis K. Papanikolaou explains how SMD prototyping practice can be used in learning environments using simple and wide available tools and equipment:

A feasibility study is herein attempted, towards the adaptation of modern surface-mount device (SMD) prototyping practice to learning environments. This necessity emerges not only from the profound advantages of the above technology (e.g. component size, availability, low cost etc.) but also from the fact that contemporary designs often require special board layout considerations, which may be incompatible with through-hole components. In addition, the long process between prototyping and product finalization can be greatly shortened. Nevertheless, the employment of surface-mount techniques in education may be discouraged by both the unappealing part sizes (i.e. handling difficulty) and the excessive cost of commercial supporting equipment. The main objective of this study is to suggest practical and low-cost solutions for all different SMD prototyping/manufacturing stages, which can demystify and render this procedure welcome and easily applicable in laboratory classes.

Surface-mount device prototyping in education – [Link]

WXR3031 rework station will replace you three devices


Soldering, deslodering, hot-air works but also a record of your work in a PC – this is the Weller WXR 3031.

Good soldering station is usually a fundament of a workplace. Desoldering station is usually a necessity if you work in development or service. And a hot-air station? – this one is becoming a must at any development or rework of PCBs with SMT components. If we already know, that it´s ideal to have all these three device on a workbench, couldn´t they be integrated into one device?

The answer can be Weller WXR 3031

Right at the beginning it can be said, that in this case a connection into one station brings real benefits, rather than well-known negatives of various „3in1“, „7in1“ and similar products and agents :-).

Perhaps the biggest benefit is saving of space on a workbench and the same control interface for all tools. If you´re familiar with Weller WX2 stations, which we introduced to you in our articles, then you know, that they belong to a very top segment. If we “add” to them a section for a hot air, as well as other additional features and a possibility to connect a vacuum pickup, we receive a top class device which makes every electrician happy.

  • 3 channels
  • 420 (600W) total power
  • temperature 100-450 (550) °C/ 200-850°C (hot-air part)

Available are 4 soldering tools (from micro up to powerful 200W) and 3 tools for desoldering. Concretely WXR 3031 set contains:

  • WXR3 unit
  • hot-air tool WXHAP
  • desoldering tool WXDP 120
  • soldering tool WXP 120

A big benefit for professional workplaces is also a possibility to record your work (traceability – temperature profile) over the USB port to a PC. USB port also serves for a possible firmware update. WXR3031 features intelligent identification of a connected tool and a parameter memory built-in in a given tool, intelligent power save function and a possibility to control several additional devices via the WX port.

WX series meets all requirements for demanding and precise everyday work. High power, user comfort and a wide range of soldering tools and tips will be probably beneficial even for your workplace.

Possibilities of the WXR3031 are very wide and perhaps best illustrated in the attached video. Detailed information will provide you the WXR3031 datasheet , user manual WXR3031 and the “WXR3 Quick start”.
WXR 3031 station was incorporated into our standard stock offer.

WXR3031 rework station will replace you three devices – [Link]

Making A SMD Reflow Oven


by packetbob @ instructables.com:

I decided to put together a toaster oven and wanted something that could handle large boards and possibly do small production runs. Doing a web search, you will find many options for toaster oven reflow controllers. They range from one-off designs to DIY boards to full kits. A large number of them are Arduino based. Some controllers just allow the oven to plug in (so you don’t need to take the oven apart) while others integrate completely inside the oven (more work but a much better product in the end).

Making A SMD Reflow Oven – [Link]

DIY soldering station


MatthiasW over at DebuggingLab posted his DIY Weller station clone project, that is available at Github:

At the fpv-community.de Forum I read about a DIY Weller station. Basically an Arduino shield to drive a Weller soldering tip. As there is not much to it, the board simply contains an precision OpAmp, a power MOSFET, 2 buttons for adjusting the temperature and a display to show the current values. This design looks like a good starting point for my own advanced project. As I have lately discovered a 1,8 inch SPI TFT at banggood.com for an amazing price ( ~ 4.60 $ / 3,70 €), I started using them regularly in my projects. So I surely wanted to use it with this soldering station as well.

DIY soldering station – [Link]

Universal soldering controller


sparkybg shared his universal soldering controller:

The intention was to build the most universal soldering controller I can think of. It can drive any low voltage (upto 24V) iron with thermocouple or resistive sensor, in series with the heater, or separate.
Here is a short list of features:
– power: 9-28V, AC or DC
– 2 separate heater control channels
– 2 independent sensor inputs
– current source on any sensor input 3uA – 12mA, wuth 2 bands (x1, x16) and 256 steps per band
– flexible differential amplifier input selection
– amplifier gain from 0 to 750 in 256 steps
– negative offset selection in 1024 steps
– resistive instrument identification (upto 625 different instruments can be identified by 2 resistors on the connector)
– polynomial floating point voltage/resistance to temperature calculation
– wave shaping to filter out the inductive peaks from series sensor signal
– PID control with power limit
– isolated USB port for firmware updates and live data
– 128×64 OLED display with rich user interface.

Universal soldering controller – [Link]

DIY WMRP-Solder Station



  • low offset op amp for soldering tip temperature measurement with type c thermocouple
  • cold junction compensation using the PTC (KTY82-210) included in the WMRP soldering pencil
  • input voltage measurement (for use with 3 cell lipo battery)
  • soldering pencil current measurement
  • recognizing if the soldering pencil rests in the stand (–> standby)
  • 3 buttons for save and recall temperature values
  • rotary encoder to set soldering temperature
  • illuminated 16×2 character LCD module
  • USB for debugging and firmware update
  • clean and small enclosure
  • 4mm safety

DIY WMRP-Solder Station – [Link]

DIY soldering robot


Here’s Brian Dorey’s completed project the DIY soldering robot project:

The DIY soldering robot which we have been building in our spare time over the past few months is now working and we have been able to solder some test Raspberry Pi expansion board headers with the machine.

DIY soldering robot – [Link]

Soldering Robot – Head Assembly

Brian Dorey writes about his soldering robot project:

We have finished the soldering iron element slider system and stepper mount for the new soldering robot project.
The soldering iron element slides on a pair or 6mm rails, drylin® accessories, precision aluminium shaft 100mm length (part no: AWMP-06) with drylin® R – Bearings (part no: RJZM-01-06) from www.igus.co.uk which are mounted into milled 6mm aluminium plates. These are bolted to a 4mm aluminium base which has slots milled to allow it to be mounted onto a horizontal frame above the board to be soldered. The design files for the head assembly can be download in PDF format Download PDF

Soldering Robot – Head Assembly – [Link]


The SMD beak

2015-02-03 17.49.33

Vassilis over vpapanik.blogspot.gr has build a nice and simple tool to help him soldering tiny SMD parts on a PCB. The tool consists of three metal parts you can easily find on your parts box and it can be proven to be really helpful as it keeps the SMD parts steady while you solder them. The build is easy, all you have to do is to bend the main rod, file the tip to conical shape and drill the other two rods. All steps can be done in under 30 minutes without special tools. Sure it can be your third hand while assembling your PCBs. He writes:

I ordered this awesome N|Watch kit the other day, which requires some serious SMD hand-soldering skills. There’s always the easy alternative to use a reflow oven, but guess what, there is no stencil included (and no, I don’t have a paste dispenser). In a desperate need of a third hand (!) in order do a neat job, I saw some similar DIY solutions (thumbs up for Google images) and managed to build my own version in less than 30 minutes, just using junk metal parts : the SMD beak !

The SMD beak – [Link]