Tag Archives: synthesizer

8V97051 Low Power Wideband Fractional RF Synthesizer

This design features a low power wideband RF synthesizer that is used in GSM receiver cards. It has dual differential and open drain outputs with frequency range of 34.375MHz to 4400MHz(in continuous range). The logic compatibility is 1.8V while the system is running on a single 3.3V supply. It has -143dBc/Hz Phase Noise (PN) performance at 1MHz Offset for every 1.1GHz output. It is also capable of mute function at RF_OUT that is accessible via mute pin or SPI command. It is low power with only 380mW average power consumption while RF_OUTB is not in used.

The design is comprised of 3 major parts. The first part consists of IDT8V97051NLGi wideband RF synthesizer/PLL supports the output frequencies with Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO). The temperature compensated crystal oscillator close to the RF input helps in the precision of signal while the other parts are filters that are used in various purposes like minimizing undesired noise. The second part consists of the USB 2.0 high speed to UART/FIFO IC that is used for system interface while the I2C-bus to SPI bridge IC controls the sequences, protocol, and timing of the signal. The last part is power supply management of the system in which it is provided with RC filters in every line to ensure minimal noise are included in the supply.

The design is applicable in multi-carrier, multi-mode Frequency Division Duplexing (FDD) and Time Division Duplexing (TDD) base station radio card. It optimizes multi-service base stations during its service as a local oscillator that generates a large variety of frequencies to mixers while maintaining excellent PN.

8V97051 Low Power Wideband Fractional RF Synthesizer – [Link]



8T49NS010 Clock Synthesizer and Fanout Buffer/Divider

This reference design features the 8T49NS010 integrated circuit that functions as a clock synthesizer with a built-in fanout buffer and divider. By using an external clock source or a crystal, the 8T49NS010 can generate high performance timing geared towards the communications and datacom markets, especially for applications demanding extremely low phase noise jitter, such as 10, 40 and 100GE. Depending on the input used, the 8T49NS010’s low phase noise integer-N PLL can multiply the reference to 2400MHz or 2500MHz.

The device offers ten clock outputs (QCLK[9:0]/nQCLK[9:0]). Each output can be disabled individually through registers. With ÷2, ÷4, ÷8 and ÷16 values one can get output frequencies of 156.25MHz, 312.5MHz, 625MHz and 1250MHz when driven from a 25MHz input, for example. The input select pin REF_SEL will choose either XTAL input or CLK_IN input will be used and this pin also set the pre-divider PRE to either x2 or ÷1. The feedback divider FB_SEL pin will set the feedback divider to either ÷50, ÷25. The feedback divider should be properly set to assure the PLL lock for VCO=2.5GHz. The N1 and N0 are pins for output frequency divider setting. Aside from the divider values that can be set using pins N1 and N0, additional divider values are available through registers that can be programmed with I2C interface. This reference design recommends the FT2232 USB to UART converter to program the device divider value via I2C pins. The 8T49NS010 operates over the industrial temperature range of -40°C to +85°C with a 3.3V supply voltage.

The 8T49NS010 provides versatile frequency configurations and output format that is optimized to deliver excellent phase noise performance. The device delivers an optimum combination of high clock frequency and low phase noise performance, combined with high power supply noise rejection.

8T49NS010 Clock Synthesizer and Fanout Buffer/Divider – [Link]

EMIC 2 Text-to-Speech Module


The Emic 2 Text-to-Speech Module is a multi-language voice synthesizer that converts a stream of digital text into natural sounding speech. Using the universally recognized DECtalk text-to-speech synthesizer engine, Emic 2 provides speech synthesis capabilities for any embedded system via a simple command-based interface.

EMIC 2 Text-to-Speech Module – [Link]

fraAngelico Synthesizer by Standuino

This is the fraAngelico synth by Standuino. He writes – [via]

FraAngelico 8-bit PWM digital synth is unique by the means of its sound generation. It does not use any D/A convertor but the sound is generated by just one digital output pin using Pulse With Modulation which means that by fast changing of different lenghts of pulses we can make different output voltages. Resolution of this technique to achieve different voltage levels is 8-bit but in the true essence the output form the synth is just 1-bit because the output pin does jus 1 or 0 which makes distinctive digital character to its sound.

Although this puristic and minimalistic approach to sound generation, FraAngelico is able to make wide range of different sound colours from powerfull bass to glitchy noises as well as complex rhithmic structures.

This unprocessed raw digital output can be also synchronised with any MIDI device through its MIDI input. To connect standart midi cable use the Standuino MIDI conector (coming very soon) or see tutorial how to connect more standuino devices to you soundcard (coming soon).

fraAngelico Synthesizer by Standuino – [Link]

Make a Propeller Platform Synth

A four part tutorial series on how to make your own SIDcog-based synthesizer with the Propeller Platform. Jeff writes… [via]

dig into the audio abilities of the Propeller Platform with the creation of your own on-screen synthesizer, starting with the basics of sound generation, then into a fully functional instrument capable of creating funky, eight-bit sounds.

Make a Propeller Platform Synth – [Link]

Sine Wave Synthesizer

Eric Hsieh and Luke Thomas writes:

Every group wants their final project to be something that will be remembered long after they’re gone. Some do highly sophisticated and complex projects that entail upwards of a hundred hours to complete. Yet others go out of their way to develop something ‘cool’ and ‘fun’. Luke and I decided that we wanted to be in this second category, because developing something that’s ‘cool’ would also be fun to do. So in deciding what to design we tried to think of something that would catch the attention of the people in the lab. The easiest way of doing this is to create something that would make noise or play music so everyone in the lab could enjoy it. Realizing this would be the best way to go, we decided to create a synthesizer that could record and playback notes, ‘teach’ the user how to play a simple melody, and also play some prerecorded tunes. After all, don’t you think being remembered as the group that played back the Imperial March theme from Star Wars is cooler than a paper tape reader? (no offense to those groups doing paper tape readers)

Sine Wave Synthesizer – [Link]

555 Contest Entry: Music synthesizer

A music synthesizer is Frank’s entry to the 555 contest. He used a 555 timer to make a really cool synthesizer that is played with a stylus and has filtering and volume enveloping features. Various note frequencies are generated with precisely calculated resistances. [via]

555 Contest Entry: Music synthesizer – [Link]

Electronic synthesizer

The heart of the synthesizer is a set of 2 Analog Devices AD9850 direct digital synthesis (DDS) chips. These provide 2 channels of sinewave output which may differ in frequency and relative phase. The output stage of the synthesizer also includes separate variable attenuators for the 2 channels. These attenuators have a range of 0.0 – 63.9 dB of attenuation, in 0.1 dB steps. The user therefore has control over five parameters: 2 output frequencies, 2 output attenuations, and relative phase between the 2 channels.

Electronic synthesizer – [Link]