Tag Archives: tester

LED Tester with LCD Display

LED-Tester-ready

David @ robotroom.com build a microcontroller based LED tester with LCD display that shows the LED voltage, the current limit in mA, the desired led voltage and the calculated resistor value. The LED tester is based on ATtiny84 mcu which performs all the measurements and calculations and updates the display. Build details on the link below.

The adjustment trimpots are on the end of the tester. The trimpot with the thumb dial is to indicate the target circuit voltage (usually 5 V or 3.3 V). The other trimpot requires a screwdriver, because it controls current, which I usually want to keep at 20 mA.

LED Tester with LCD Display – [Link]

ATMEGA328 Component Tester

FAD5FSEIJORXCZM.MEDIUM

baweja_akshay @ instructables.com has build a ATMEGA328 component tester that is able to test Resistors, Capacitors, Inductors, BJT, FET, Thyristors and more.

Coming upon COMPONENT TESTER so it can test almost everything, obviously not the power components because they require more current and power which our AVR Microcontroller couldn’t handle !! Oh yeah, I forgot to tell you guys that we would be using an ATMEGA328 for our build !!

ATMEGA328 Component Tester – [Link]

Component Tester FISH 8840 Review

Component_Tester_FISH8840_9494

Alan Parekh @ hackedgadgets.com has a review of a cheap component tested he found on ebay. This device can test bipolar transistors, MOSFET, diodes, thyristors, resistors and capacitors. He writes:

This is an inexpensive component tester called the FISH 8840 which you can find from many online eBay retailers for around $30. The interface is very simple, attach a device to be tested and press the test button. It turns off after about 20 seconds, pressing the off button puts it into sleep mode immediately. There is a ZIF socket that allows you to insert leaded devices and pads that allow you to press SMD devices directly onto the tester.

Component Tester FISH 8840 Review – [Link]

IR remote tester

remote_tester_test

Who never had the need to test a TV or DVD remote?

I have several times. My favorite technique was to take my mobile phone and with the camera pointed at the infrared emitter look for a flashing little purple light. The mobile phone technique is an way for testing the remote but still i decided to make a small circuit just to test the remotes.

IR remote tester – [Link]

Arduino DMX 512 Tester/Controller

Hardware v00

daniel3514 writes:

A tool to control and test light show controlled by the protocol DMX-512, ideal for quick tests on fixed or temporary installations of lighting. This project arises from the need to have a portable system for rapid testing in lighting installations, without the need to install lighting consoles, interfaces or computers in environments outside, hostile or difficult to access.

Arduino DMX 512 Tester/Controller – [Link]

Circuit provides constant-current load for testing batteries

battery_tester

by Vladimir Rentyuk @ edn.com

Suppose that you need to test a 1.5V, AA-size alkaline battery. You can apply a short circuit and measure current, or you can measure open-circuit voltage, but neither method properly tests the battery. A suitable test current of approximately 250 mA gives you a more reasonable test. You can use a 6Ω resistive load at 1.5V, which produces an output voltage of 1.46V at an ambient temperature of 25°C if the battery is in excellent condition. A poor battery might produce less than 1.2V. Given the load, the output current at 1.2V will be 200 mA instead of 250 mA. The battery will have just 80% of a full load current. Instead, you can use the circuit in Figure 1 to produce a constant-current load.

Circuit provides constant-current load for testing batteries – [Link]

Arduino Monitor/Tester

IMG_4391-e1391203511652

This is an Arduino monitor – tester by ctopconsult.com:

Features:

One LED for every single input or output
Can be used with Uno, Leonardo, Mega, Due, Mini, etc.
Also fits with my universal I/O board
Power taken from Arduino 5V and 3.3V outputs, and the Vin
Load on any pin is 10 kohm or more
LED intensity proportionally reflects the pin voltage or duty cycle

Arduino Monitor/Tester – [Link]

AC Continuity Tester

This article details an AC-based continuity tester designed for frontline test and repair jobs. The circuit provides a simple GO/NO-GO test for localizing faults in multicore cables. Open circuits are more likely at connector ends. By identifying the faulty end, the AC continuity tester allows you to open and repair the correct cable end. This action avoids the risk of damaging a good connector by opening it up. This approach is also useful for testing an installed cable with ends at different locations.

The schematic illustrates a circuit for a continuity tester that injects an AC signal on one cable wire and then looks for the absence of capacitive coupling on the other wires. One end of a bad cable typically shows good AC continuity, while the other end typically has one or more connector pins with no AC continuity. Because a short in the cable appears as a good connection, the operator can easily confirm that the tester is operating correctly by simply shorting its test leads together.

The left side of the circuit uses a low-power dual comparator (MAX9022) to form a relaxation oscillator operating at approximately 155kHz. It produces a peak-to-peak output signal approximately equal to the supply voltage, which is fed to a connector of the cable under test. The right side of the circuit processes any AC signal picked up by the inter-lead capacitance. That AC signal is first rectified by a pair of silicon diodes, and then integrated on storage capacitor C5. The bleed resistor (R5) provides some noise immunity and helps to reset the capacitor between tests.

The output resistor (R4) and input capacitor (C4) provide limited circuit protection. The circuit indicates OPEN for any test-cable capacitance below 100pF. (Thus, a standard 2m IEC mains test lead, whose typical lead-to-lead capacitance is 200pF, would test OK.) The circuit is also immune to false triggers caused by the 60Hz pickup from power lines.

Because the typical current draw of this low-power circuit is less than 40μA most of the time, the circuit can be powered by three AA or AAA 1.5V pencil batteries.

Many low-cost alternatives are available for the output device (e.g., a DC-activated piezoelectric buzzer), and most alternatives feature a suitably wide operating voltage range. The 100nF capacitors are standard ceramic decoupling capacitors, and the circuit contains no critical passive components. The comparator’s high-side drive is better than its low-side drive, so it should be used to source (rather than sink) current to the indicator device. Diodes D1 through D3 are silicon diodes.

AC Continuity Tester – [Link]

Arduino DMX Tester – Inexpensive Tester for Sending DMX-512

DmxKeyPads

Tony Keith build an Arduino DMX tester, he writes:

I work part-time (more of a hobby) in the lighting industry and use DMX since it is the industry standard for communicating or controlling devices (lighting fixtures, controllers, consoles, etc..) I have seen commercial DMX testers on the market but I wanted to create my own.

I have been working on an idea to create a low cost (<$50), Arduino based DMX tester.

The tester would provide the following functionality:
Simple input protocol for entering commands using 4 X 4 (16) key pad matrix.
Support LCD display (4 x 20) Character
Output DMX for single channel or a range of channels at a set intensity level.

Arduino DMX Tester – Inexpensive Tester for Sending DMX-512 – [Link]