Tag Archives: TFT

Using the ST7735 1.8″ Color TFT Display with Arduino

1.8″ Colored TFT Display

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. Today, we will look on how to use the 1.8″ ST7735  colored TFT display with Arduino. The past few tutorials have been focused on how to use the Nokia 5110 LCD display extensively but there will be a time when we will need to use a colored display or something bigger with additional features, that’s where the 1.8″ ST7735 TFT display comes in.

The ST7735 TFT display is a 1.8″ display with a resolution of 128×160 pixels and can display a wide range of colors ( full 18-bit color, 262,144 shades!). The display uses the SPI protocol for communication and has its own pixel-addressable frame buffer which means it can be used with all kinds of microcontroller and you only need 4 i/o pins. To complement the display, it also comes with an SD card slot on which colored bitmaps can be loaded and easily displayed on the screen.

Using the ST7735 1.8″ Color TFT Display with Arduino – [Link]

Researches Solve Problems of Organic Thin Film Transistors By Developing Nanostructured Gate Dielectric

Amorphous silicon-based Thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the foundation of many modern-day technologies, such as smartphones and flat-panel TVs. Still, it comes with a few drawbacks like performance limitations due to limited carrier mobility. Provoking the researchers in search of something better.

As a result, Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) were developed. OTFTs have solved the problem with carrier mobility to an extent. Although it introduced new problems such as the critical performance parameter of large threshold voltage instabilities. Threshold voltages—also known as gate voltages—are the minimum voltage differential needed between a gate and the source to create a conducting path between the source and drain terminals.

Nanostructured Gate dielectric opens new possibilities in OTFTs

Latest works of the researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology seems to overcome the voltage instability problem with OTFTs. They have developed a nanostructured gate dielectric that can regulate voltage threshold fluctuations in OTFTs.

gate dielectric is an important component of every thin-film transistor. It acts as the electrically insulating layer between the gate terminal and the semiconductor. It should have a high dielectric constant, be very thin, and have a high dielectric strength for the transistor to function at low voltage.

On applying a voltage across the gate electrode, the resulting electric field across this insulating layer changes the density of carriers in the semiconductor layer. It regulates the current that is flowing between the source and the drain electrodes. Many different materials are used to make this insulating layer. Such as dielectric polymers, inorganic oxides or combinations of different organic and inorganic materials.

The Georgia Tech researchers used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technique to build a thin metal oxide layer on top of a perfluorinated dielectric polymer. They chose ALD for its ability to produce layers that are free from any defects. Bernard Kippelen, a professor at Georgia Tech, and leader of the research said:

The low defect density reduces the diffusion of moisture into the underlying organic semiconductor layer, preventing its degradation.

The performance of the new organic thin-film transistors seems to surpass that of hydrogenated amorphous silicon technology. According to Kippelen, it revolutionizes OTFTs in terms of charge mobility and stability. He stated:

It is premature and difficult at this stage to provide a direct comparison with what is currently on the market; nevertheless, we believe that the level of stability that is achieved is an important step for printed electronics.

Before the future applications, Kippelen and his team will further investigate the mechanical properties of these printed transistors since they show great potential with flexible form factor products. Further information can be found on the Research paper published in the journal Science Advances.

Arduino Mega Chess on TFT display

Chess processor with GUI dedicated for Arduino Mega. by Sergey Urusov

After some my Arduino project remains unclaimed touchscreen, so I decided to realize my chidhood dream to create a chess program. After a couple of months it wins me, but it is not big deal because i do not have any chess rating, just amateur.

This project uses Arduino Mega 2560 because of lack of operative memory on Uno, 2.8 inch touchscreen, passive buzzer, and about 2000 lines of code.

Arduino Mega Chess on TFT diplay – [Link]

gen4 3.2”, The New Intelligent Display Modules

4D Systems, the manufacturer of intelligent graphics solutions, has announced a new 3.2” smart display module as part of the ‘ gen4 ’ series, which had been designed specifically for ease of integration and use, with careful consideration for space requirements and functionality.

These modules features a 3.2” color TFT display with options for Cover Lens Bezel (CLB), Resistive Touch and Capacitive Touch. The display is capable of Touch Detection, microSD memory Storage, GPIO and Communications, along with multiple millisecond resolution timers, and Audio Generation. gen4 modules have 30 pin ZIF socket for a 30 pin FPC cable, for easy and simple connection to an application or a motherboard.

The gen4 display modules are powered by the 4D Systems Diablo16 graphics processor that offers an array of functionality and options for any Designer / Integrator / User. Diablo16 is a custom embedded 4DGL graphics controller designed to interface with many popular OLED and LCD display panels.

gen4 display modules features:

  • Powerful 3.2” Intelligent LCD-TFT display module powered by DIABLO16.
  • 240 x 320 Resolution, RGB 65K true to life colours, TFT Screen with integrated 4-wire Resistive Touch Panel (on DT model only).
  • 6 banks of 32750 bytes of Flash memory for User Application Code and Data.
  • 32Kb of SRAM purely for the User.
  • 16 General Purpose I/O pins for user interfacing, which include 4 configurable Analog Inputs.
  • The GPIO is variously configurable for alternative functions such as:
    • 3x I2C channels available.
    • 1x SPI dedicated for SD Card and 3x configurable SPI channels available.
    • 1x dedicated and 3x configurable TTL Serial comm ports available.
    • Up to 6 GPIO can be used as Pin Counters.
    • Up to 6 GPIO for PWM (simple and Servo).
    • Up to 10 GPIO for Pulse Output.
    • Up to 14 GPIO can be configured for Quadrature Encoder Inputs (2 channels).
  • 30pin FPC connection, for all signals, power, communications, GPIO and programming.
  • On-board latch type micro-SD memory card connector for multimedia storage and data logging purposes.
  • DOS compatible file access (FAT16 format) as well as low level access to card memory.
  • Dedicated PWM Audio pin driven by WAV files from micro-SD card, and for sound generation, for an external amplifier.
  • Display full colour images, animations, icons and video clips.
  • Supports all available Windows fonts.
  • 4.0V to 5.5V range operation (single supply).
  • Module dimensions:
    • (D): 95.7 x 57.1 x 6.3mm.
    • (D-CLB): 98.8 x 72.6 x 7.4mm.
    • (DT): 95.7 x 57.1 x 7.5mm.
    • (DCT-CLB): 98.8 x 72.6 x 8.3mm.
  • 4x mounting tabs with 3.2mm holes for mechanical mounting using M3 screws.
  • RoHS and REACH compliant.
  • CE Compliant – please ask for CE declarations from our Support Team.

The intelligent gen4 displays can be programmed via Workshop4 IDE. It provides an integrated software development platform for all of the 4D family of processors and modules. The IDE combines the Editor, Compiler, Linker and Downloader to develop complete 4DGL application code.

gen4 modules are available in 4 models:

  • gen4-uLCD-32D (non Touch, without Cover Lens Bezel)
  • gen4-uLCD-32DT (Resistive Touch, without Cover Lens Bezel)
  • gen4-uLCD-32D-CLB (non Touch, Cover Lens Bezel)
  • gen4-uLCD-32DCT-CLB (Capacitive Touch, with Cover Lens Bezel)

The module is available on the official website with a range of $55 to $79 including interface board, 150mm FFC cable, and a quick start guide. Starter kits are also available from $75 to $99.

Bitmap graphics on an Arduino Touch Screen and other top Arduino Displays

In this video tutorial educ8s.tv shows us how to load bitmap graphics in our Arduino Touch Screen projects using Adafruit’s GFX library.

The procedure that I am going to describe works with all the color displays that are supported by Adafruit’s GFX library and by the displays that use the TFTLCD library from Adafruit with a small modification. So from the displays I own I can use the color OLED display, the 1.8” ST7735 color TFT display, the 2.8” Color Touch Screen that I reviewed a few weeks ago and the 3.5” Color TFT display. You can find links for all the displays below.

Bitmap graphics on an Arduino Touch Screen and other top Arduino Displays [Link]

Choose The Best Display For Your Arduino Project

Have you ever been unsure which display you should be using in your next project? This tutorial from educ8s.tv will come in handy for choosing the best display for your each and every Arduino project!

There are lots of choices, so let’s talk about each one of them. Basically, you have three types of displays: LCD displays, OLED displays, and E-paper displays.

LCD displays: LCD (liquid crystal display) is the technology used for displays in notebook and other smaller computers. Like light-emitting diode (LED) and gas-plasma technologies, LCDs allow displays to be much thinner than cathode ray tube (CRT) technology. LCD display is a flat-panel display or other electronic visual display that uses the light-modulating properties of liquid crystals.

One of the famous LCD displays is Nokia 5110 LCD display, a basic graphic LCD screen for lots of applications. It was originally intended for as a cell phone screen.


Its controller is a low power CMOS LCD controller which makes it a good choice for low-consumption projects. It uses only 0.4mA when it is on and less than 0.06mA when in sleep mode. You have to use this library and you don’t need more than 8 wires to start using this display. This tutorial video will show you with details how to use Nokia 5110 LCD with Arduino:

A second choice is the OLED displays. OLED is an organic light emitting diode in which the emissive electroluminescent layer is a film of organic compound that emits light in response to an electric current. An OLED display works without a backlight; it can display deep black levels and can be thinner and lighter than a liquid crystal display. Thus, it is provides better contrast than the LCD choice but it becomes a bit more expensive.


One of the newest OLED displays is the color SSD1331 display that can display 65.000 colors. Just download its library from Adafruit and start using it. A video explaining how to use it is available here.

The last type is E-paper displays, that mimic the appearance of ordinary ink on paper.


Unlike LCD or OLED displays, these displays reflect light instead of emitting it. Such displays are great for low power projects since they have the ability to keep the text or the image you had set before for a really long time and without electricity. One of these displays disadvantages that they are absolutely costly compared with other choices, some displays can reach $60!

Color TFT Display ST7735, White OLED Display SSD1306 and 3.5″ Color TFT Display are all mentioned in the tutorial. You should check it out for more details, information, and some hardware offers.

The tutorial concludes with this interactive table based on different criteria, this is ordered progressively by price. You can compare between displays here.


Using a Color Sensor (TCS230) with Arduino Uno and ST7735 color TFT display

In this video tutorial educ8s.tv show us how use the TCS230 color sensor with Arduino:

Hey guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. In this video we are going to learn how to use the TCS230 color sensor, a very interesting sensor. I have built a simple project to demonstrate that this sensor is really capable. I use an Arduino Uno and a 1.8” Color TFT display and of course the color sensor. As you can see, the sensor detects the colors and it displays them on the screen. The color we get on the screen is pretty close to the real color of the object. Cool isn’t it? Now, let’s see the parts that we need in order to build this project.

Using a Color Sensor (TCS230) with Arduino Uno and ST7735 color TFT display [Link]

2.8″ TFT LCD Touch Screen ILI9325 with Arduino Uno and Mega

educ8s.tv uploaded a new video. This is a 2.8” Arduino Touch Screen Tutorial with the ILI9325 driver. Nick writes:

Hey guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. Today we are going to take a look at this 2.8” touch screen designed for Arduino. As you can see, I have loaded a demo program that displays a button on the screen. When I press the button with my finger, the program displays a message. As demonstrated the touch screen is working fine! Finally we can start building projects with a touch screen which are much more interesting and easier to use.

2.8″ TFT LCD Touch Screen ILI9325 with Arduino Uno and Mega [Link]

Simple Arduino Radio with TEA5767


@ instructables.com has uploaded a new tutorial on how to make a simple arduino radio based on 2.2″ TFT ILI9225 controller, TEA5767 breakout board and Arduino MEGA2560. The radio can play a list of predefined stations and can’t scan through them.

So, I was searching for a tutorial to create a simple Radio with Arduino… And all what I found was very complex sketches for a very simple result, and I didn’t find any tutorials to use it with a TFT and UTFT library.

I decide to create a tutorial for noobs like me which are searching for it

Simple Arduino Radio with TEA5767 – [Link]

Arduino-compatible touch-enabled display shield from FTDI

CleO is a simple to program, intelligent TFT display solution that allows the construction of human machine interfaces (HMIs) with – says maker FTDI chip – much higher performance than conventional Arduino display shields are able to deliver. by Graham Prophet [via]

FTDI first introduced its Arduino-compatible concept – aiming to reach a wider audience – by means of a crowdfunding exercise. The company now has full availability of the CleO product (and accompanying accessories) through its distribution partners, as well as directly via the company’s website. FTDI Chip will also give engineers complete access to a comprehensive development resource, which has step-by-step tutorials and projects, plus a series of software tools. In addition, a new forum has been set up ( www.CleOstuff.com) on which design tips, application ideas and other information can be shared.