Tag Archives: Timer

Headlight Modulator for Motorcycle


William Dudley @ dudley.nu has designed a motorcycle headlight modulator based on 555 timer IC and photoresistor. A headlight modulator will make the headlight to pulse during the day and be steady at night. He writes:

Unhappy with a headlight modulator I purchased, I decided to make my own. Even though it would be a trivial programming project to use an Arduino Teensy or similar to do this, I decided to do it the “old fashioned” way, using a 555 timer. The 555 is a clever chip; not only will it supply the oscillator for the flashing effect, it has a reset pin that can be used to force the output to a known state (low) when (other circuitry tells it that) it’s dark outside.

Headlight Modulator for Motorcycle – [Link]

Disco Lights with IC555


This is a simple 555 timer IC circuit that is able to power two strings of LEDs alternative.

Disco lights are mostly used in decoration made with colourful LEDs. For begginners, this is a compact circuit using a single chip IC. IC555 is connected here to form a multivibrator. The blinking speed can be easily adjusted by varying the preset 500kΩ. You can use any colour of LED.

Disco Lights with IC555 – [Link]

NE555 timer sparks low-cost voltage-to-frequency converter


by Gyula Dioszegi @ edn.com:

In 1971, Signetics—later Philips—introduced the NE555 timer, and manufacturers are still producing more than 1 billion of them a year. By adding a few components to the NE555, you can build a simple voltage-to-frequency converter for less than 50 cents. The circuit contains a Miller integrator based on a TL071 along with an NE555 timer (Figure 1). The input voltage in this application ranges from 0 to –10V, yielding an output-frequency range of 0 to 1000 Hz. The current of C1 is the function of input voltage: IC=–VIN/(P1+R1).

NE555 timer sparks low-cost voltage-to-frequency converter – [Link]

Delay using 8051 Timer

The major component of this circuit is Microchip’s SST89E54RDA-40-C-PIE, which is a pin-for-pin compatible with typical 8051 microcontroller devices. It has a built-in timer used to produce accurate time delay. The light emitting diode (LED) is connected through the 330Ω resistor to indicate the time delay. The blinking LED switches ON for 1ms and switches OFF for 1ms that indicates toggling from LOW to HIGH and HIGH to LOW. Output PIN P2.2 can be connected to an oscilloscope to generate a square wave.

SST89E58RDA-40-C-PIE comes with 72 Kbyte of on-chip flash EEPROM program memory that is partitioned into 2 independent program memory blocks. The primary Block 0 occupies 64 Kbyte of internal program memory space and the secondary Block 1 occupies 8 Kbyte of internal program memory space. The 8-Kbyte secondary blocks can be mapped to the lowest location of the 64 Kbyte address space; it can also be hidden from the program counter and used as an independent EEPROM-like data memory. In addition to the 72 Kbyte of EEPROM program memory on-chip and 1024 x8 bits of on-chip RAM, the devices can address up to 64 Kbyte of external program memory and up to 64 Kbyte of external RAM.

This design integrating Microchip’s SST89E54RDA-40-C-PIE would be used if high-accuracy, precision and timing resolution of timed events are required to activate or deactivate control outputs based on programmed time intervals. Time delay applications include pump control, food processing, and packaging control where precise ON/OFF control is necessary.

Delay using 8051 Timer – [Link]

Arduino Chess Clock


by benhur.goncalves @ instructables.com:

Hey folks! After making an Arduino smartwatch just last week, I received many complaints,or tips, to use a RTC (real-time clock) module. That’s because the Arduino timer is not very precise, it can lose a couple a minutes along a full work day. Luckly, I had one of those modules at my home, I decided to give it a try. However, I faced some challenges along the way, as I can show you here.

Arduino Chess Clock – [Link]

Emon-server – 555 Timer as power usage sensor


by dkroeske @ github.com:

A cheap 555 timer chip acting as Schmitt trigger combined with a phototransistor or LDR is taped to the ‘flashing light’ or ‘pulsing magnet’ on the electricity meter. The output of the 555 timer chip is connected to one of the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi. A Python script (executing in the background) recording 555 events is calculating actual energy usage [e.g. Watt] every time the 555 is signaling and stores epochs in an SQLite3 database. From this, another Python script (executed from e.g. cron) generates all kinds of energy usage information (e.g. kWh or kWday or whatever). Using Node.js (running on the same Pi) all data is ‘RESTified’ enabling spreading out to the W3. To maintain privacy JSON web tokens are required every time the service is queried. Oh, and there is also a Pimatic plugin available (here)

Emon-server – 555 Timer as power usage sensor – [Link]

Dog Repellent Ultrasonic Circuit 2



When we hear the word “Ultrasonic” we often refer it to bats and dolphins communication. Technically, “Ultrasonic” applies to sound that is anything above the frequencies of audible sound, and includes anything over 20kHz. Frequencies used for medical diagnostic ultrasound scans extend to 10 MHz and beyond. This dog repellent ultrasonic circuit will chase away angry dogs. It comprises of a 555 timer IC, a speaker/piezoelectric and a little ferrite transformer.

The main part of this circuit is a 555 timer IC. A 555 timer IC is an integrated circuit (chip) used in a variety of timer, pulse generation, and oscillator applications. The 555 can be used to provide time delays, as an oscillator, and as a flip-flop element. Derivatives provide up to four timing circuits in one package. You can use the 555 effectively without understanding the function of each pin in detail. Frequently, the 555 is used in astable mode to generate a continuous series of pulses, but you can also use the 555 to make a one-shot or monostable circuit. The 555 can source or sink 200 mA of output current, and is capable of driving wide range of output devices.

To use this circuit adjust 4k7Ω Resistor at resonance frequency of the piezo transducer for maximum amplitude of the repeller ultrasonic sound. At 11 KHz to 22kHz this can reach a value of 10Vpp and the buzzer is a passive one (without generator).

Note: Ultrasonic frequency must be set with a dog nearby.


4k7Ω Resistor
10uF Capacitor
10nF Capacitor
1k2Ω Resistor
4k7Ω Potentiometer
NC Push Button

Dog Repellent Ultrasonic Circuit 2 – [Link]

1 to 100 Seconds Timer


This project is a timer project and build around popular 555 Timer IC, It can be used for all application required a delay of up to 100 Seconds. Onboard board preset to adjust the required timer duration in range of of 1 to 100 Seconds, Tact switch SW1 to reset the timer and SW2 to start the timer. LED D3 works as power indicator and LED D2 to indicate timer operation.

Load can be connected to CN1 Screw Terminal, Out-put has both the operation normally Open and normally closed. Circuits works on 12V DC and consume approx. 100mA current. Very useful project can be used in various applications like water irrigation system, Kitchen timer etc.

Supply input 12 VDC @ 100 mA
Onboard start and reset tactile switch
Relay output: SPDT relay
Relay specification: 5 A @ 250 VAC
Relay state LED indicator
Preset adjustable range function
Power-On LED indicator
Screw terminal connector for easy relay output connection
Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
PCB dimensions 48 mm x 63 mm

1 to 100 Seconds Timer – [Link]

Simple timer with PIC16F628A


This is a quick project for a timer. Recently I finished my UV light exposure box and thought that it will be convenient to have a build in timer to switch off the light after preset time. So I had a PIC16F628A lying around and after searching the web I found a Brazilian site (I think?) with tons of interesting projects with microcontrolers. This project is based on one of them.

The schematic uses the internal oscillator of the microcontroller which is enough accurate for my purposes, but as the pins 15 and 16 are left unoccupied, there can be connected external quartz resonator with better accuracy. As I said, this project is based on an existing project, but actually my schematic is quite different and the code was almost completely rewritten. My programming abilities are little rusty, but I think the final result is quite good.

Simple timer with PIC16F628A – [Link]

MAX6369 Series Watchdog Timers


The MAX6369-74 series watchdog-only supervisors are available in tiny SOT23-8 packages and have selectable watchdog timeout periods (1.7ms to 104s), start-up delays (1.7ms to 104s) and output pulse widths (1.7ms and 170ms) depending on the part selected and the state of 3 pins (SEL0, SEL1, SEL2). These parts have several advantages over the historical “555” solutions. As well as the lower supply current (20µA max instead of 120µA max at 5V supply) the overall solution takes much less board area with the smaller package and the absence of large timing resistors and capacitors.

MAX6369 Series Watchdog Timers – [Link]